or Connect
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Announcements › Messages for All Guests and Members › I Knew It!!!!!! HELP!!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

I Knew It!!!!!! HELP!!

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
When I finally gave up on getting an electric burner on my homemade smoker and went to propane, one of my fears was that I would run out of propane at the worst possible moment. Well, it has happened. I left the smoker last night for 6 hours and when I went out this morning it had shut off. I had a SmokyOkie brisket in with foil over it, and a pork roast. The roast had a thermometer in it still reading 110 degrees. It was 145 when I left it. Is this meat ruined?
I read where meat between 40 and 140 degrees for 2 hours is suspect for making people sick. I have people coming over in a few hours and I am worried about serving this meat to them.
I have the meat heating up again, but I am not sure what to do.
Advice Please!!!!!
post #2 of 25
Sorry to hear that bro............you should NEVER leave a smoker unattended for that long, especially a gas unit, tough call on the meat, i would say it sat too long in the danger zone.............can you say pizza??
post #3 of 25
Well there is no way of knowing since you do not know how long the meat was below 140. It sounds like it might have run out of propane at least several hours ago judging by the internal temperature.

If it was me, I would toss it as I wouldn't want to take the chance of getting my family or my friends ill.

If you are still set on smoking for the crowd I'd throw in a couple yard birds which were rubbed down quick. if you cook them at 325 you should be able to get them done quickly. Maybe add a fatty or two as well.

Sorry to hear it.
post #4 of 25
You might have time to do some chickens.. wouldn't have time to brine them but If you cranked up the temp to around 275 and really threw the smoke to em'.. maybe pecan or mesquite, could be done in about 3 hours or so.

I have been known to take chickens right out of the package, rinse them good, sprinkle on some lemon pepper and put them right into the smoker.

I would keep the smoke going for the entire time if you crank up the heat like that though.

Chickens can handle the heat and still do very well.. even 300 degrees would not be unheard of..

Anyone else with me on that?
post #5 of 25
Ron50.. great minds think alikePDT_Armataz_01_29.gif
post #6 of 25

I have had good results at 325 but that was with a brined bird. I think 300 would give you enough time and avoid drying out the birds. Make sure you rub them down with a simple rub, Emeril has a nice poultry rub you could try. Maybe throw a cut up lemon or orange in the cavity and spritz it down with some oj/evoo mix/.

If you have the time grab some JD sausage rolls, rub them down and toss it in the smoker too. Cook to 165-170.

definitely use wood the entire smoke
post #7 of 25
Thread Starter 


I figured that was going to be the answer. Very tough to do. Did I mention it was a SmokyOkie brisket? Okay...Okay...I'll (gulp) toss it.icon_mad.gif
post #8 of 25
This should help...

Brisket.. $26.00
Paying your friend or family's doctor bill.. $300.00

You could be saving around $275.00 in the long run and if multiple folks got deathly sick.. well.. the savings just keep multiplying.

post #9 of 25
It's a lot of meat to toss but your health comes first. Chalk it off to an expensive learning experience.
post #10 of 25
Agree with you and Ron50. In fact, 2 weeks ago, I had to finish a couple of yardbirds in the oven after a good smoking (got started late, but wanted the smoke flavor). Smoked for 1 1/2 hr at 250*, then into the oven set at 325*. I did have a probe in the breast to monitor the temp. Turned out darn good. Moist, tender, and with the smoke taste I was wanting.
post #11 of 25
What type of equipment are you using? My GOSM usually gets about 22 to 24 hours of flame at half throttle. This can change with ambient temperature and humidity.

I have harped on this and wil continue to do so.....propane users MUST invest in extra tanks. If you plan to be right by the unit for the entire smoke then use a tank which is questionable and be ready to replace it as soon as it gives up.

I would much rather have a partial tank floating around, I can always put it to my grill, than to have an interrupted smoke.

Now, for food, I would suggest, if time is short, part out those chix! They will cook somewhat more quickly and will be just as delicious! Or, do some parts and a couple of whole birds.

A quick trip to the store will get some kielbasa, linguica and other types of sausage. Perhaps some sweet or hot Italian sausage. Bias cut the Kielbasa and Linguica and prepare the Italian sausage links whole. Serve with the usual condiments.

Hope this helps!

post #12 of 25
Thread Starter 
Well, I tossed the meat. Man that was hard. That SmokyOkie brisket sure smelled good. It seems everyone else has such good luck most of the time, while I struggle most of the time.
I need to hear some horror stories from other people. Surely someone has a hard luck smoking experience?
post #13 of 25
Nope.............................rolleyes.gif ( Dawg also ducks down to avoid the rath of God.......)
post #14 of 25
Lesson learned................pulling an all-niter require's that you stay up ALL night...............rolleyes.gif
post #15 of 25
I've learned from the past, never take a risk on questionable food. You can always make it up with something else, and in the end everyone will be happy.
post #16 of 25
I think we all have had horror stories. Mine was on my first smoke, the butcher "accidently" froze the pork butt I ordered and I spent hours defrosting it in cold water. I finally thought it was defrosted, stuck it in the smoker, stuck the temperature probe in and it was 32 degrees!

Things will improve. Next time you know you can't walk away for 6 hours. It could have been worse, you could have come back to a fire in your smoker and a flaming butt!!
post #17 of 25
Sigh. Double sigh. @#$@!%*!!!
Some lessons really hurt. Those are the ones you don't forget.
post #18 of 25
Really sorry about your misfortune. But you did the right thing.

I have heard one horror story tht was worse. In this case, the wind or something caused the flame to go out. The propane bottle, of course, didn't know so it just kept spewing out the gas. This guy got tired and went in to take a little snooze. He was woken up to a big explosion when the seeping propane flooded over next to the dieing fire he had been using for warmth.

So, as one of the first responses mentioned, you can never leave a smoker for long and when it is a propane smoker, you really do need to keep an eye on it.

Just glad no one was the worse for this, except the old pocket book, of course.

post #19 of 25
Here's a thread to show you that some of us don't always have perfection as an end result... Just For Fun While We Wait Feel free to add to it if you like.

Keep Smokin
post #20 of 25
Thread Starter 

I Survived

Well, we had some leftovers and everything went OK. I went and bought another brisket and some ribs to try again tomorrow.
I'm glad now that I threw it away, it aint' worth people getting sick.
Reading that thread on other people's problems really cheered me up! (is that wrong?)
Thanks PigCicles! And thanks to everyone else for the advice and encouragement.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Announcements › Messages for All Guests and Members › I Knew It!!!!!! HELP!!