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Smoked wings question

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Hi all.  I just inherited an old Cabelas Premium Electric smoker from my best friend and I would like to try it out with some smoked wings.  The overall intent is to try and get used to using the smoker.  So just a few quick questions.  First would I lay the wings in an aluminum pan or directly on the grills?  I would like to start with a dry rub so if anyone would be so kind as to suggest a simple recipe.  Personally I am not a huge fan of hot or very spicy but anything else I am open to.  I am thinking about 2-3 pounds.  Would 2 hours give or take at around 250F work?  Thanks in advance

post #2 of 9

Direct on the grill. The simplest rub is SPOG Salt Pepper Onion powder Garlic powder. You can add other seasoning if you want. 2 hours should get you to where you need to be. Keep in mind that at those low temps the skin may be rubbery. chicken does better at higher temps. To help the skin air dry the wings. Rub your wings with SPOG (add a 1/4 teaspoon of baking powder to the SPOG) Place on a rack over a baking pan or shallow dish and place uncovered into the fridge. Best to do overnight or for a minimum of 4 hours. Drying the skin will help get the skin at least bite through at the lower pit temp. Even at higher pit temps drying the skin on poultry is a must do step. Keep in mind that poultry should be cooked to an internal temp if 165°. Hard to check on wings but can be done.

post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 

What smoking temperature might you suggest?

post #4 of 9
If your smoker can go high, 325-350.
post #5 of 9
I do mine slightly different and have had great results. I'll let the wings soak overnight in buttermilk and hot sauce. I put them on a rack, uncovered in the fridge for a few hours, give a liberal coating of Tony C's and smoke them at about 250 for a couple hours. I like to let them cool to room temp and then toss them on a hot grill for a couple minutes to heat up and crisp the skin. I've received many compliments for them and they are a highly requested item when folks are coming over. Good luck! icon14.gif
post #6 of 9

We do wings with EVOO & Montreal chicken seasoning for the rub.

 

Smoke at 250-275 for about 1 hour & 20 minutes.

 

Then on to a screamin' hot grill, for a couple of minutes on each side to get the skin crispy.

 

You have to watch them close, so as not to burn them.

 

As you can tell there are probably as many ways to smoke wings as there are for ribs.

 

Al

post #7 of 9

i like Montreal seasoning too, but i buy the cheapest zesty Italian dressing, soak them in it overnight, take them out in the morning and coat a Montreal seasoning and let air dry in the fridge till i around 4 pm and smoke at 300 for about 1-1.5 hours... i get a combination of some crispy and some bite through skin but not all crispy like grilling them and i think (but I'm not sure) that air drying them in the fridge is a a big factor in getting some crispy skin after sitting in Italian dressing all night.

post #8 of 9

I like the Italian dressing method as well, with one caveat:  don't buy the "cheapest" that you can find.  If it's not something that you'll eat on a salad, why skimp with some lousy tasting concoction on other food, just to save a nickel or two?  Same goes for cooking with wine:  if you're not willing to drink it, why cook with it?  Not saying that you have to burn a $75 bottle on a merlot braised roast, but use some quality ingredients.  Like the old computer saying, garbage in--garbage out.  My $0.02.

post #9 of 9

i understand your sentiment Gr0uch0 and generally agree... I'm trying to slightly mimic a marinate that i could get when i lived in western NY and the cheaper ones with the combination of Montreal seasoning seems to come the closest. I'm sure a better dressing would likely be better, but there is a nostalgia factor for me and the walmart great value zesty Italian (which is as cheap as they come) does that.

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