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Bad smoke in my MES - Page 2

post #21 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by daRicksta View Post
 


A number of pitmasters suggest smoking low and slow at 225°. I've tried smoking at that temp but for me it just takes too long. You said that at that temp your St. Louis ribs after 5 hours were still underdone. My favorite temp range is 235-242°. I say "range" because in my MES 30, which is over 4 hours old and has a new controller, the controller will cycle a few degrees above and below the set point until about 5-6 hours in the temp remains stable. But my point is at that 235-242 range I can finish off two racks of STL ribs within 5 hours. At 6 hours the meat is too much "falling off the bone". To me, if a pitmaster is in a competition and has all day or night to cook up ribs, brisket or whatever, they can afford to keep the temp down at 225°. I have a beginner's smoker cookbook by Ray"Dr. BBQ" Lampe and he instructs the set point to be 235° for just about all the recipes. That temp range has worked fine for me.

Everyone is different. I am close to Rick @ 235-245 degrees. I will have to check, but I think I read in Arron Franklin's book that his temp is 275 degrees. We need to keep in mind though that we are using electric smokers and Aaron and other pitmasters use wood and a complete different type smoker.

post #22 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brickguy221 View Post
 

Everyone is different. I am close to Rick @ 235-245 degrees. I will have to check, but I think I read in Arron Franklin's book that his temp is 275 degrees. We need to keep in mind though that we are using electric smokers and Aaron and other pitmasters use wood and a complete different type smoker.


The reason why I don't smoke at 275° is also why I don't drive at 100 mph. Sure, my car/smoker are designed to operate at the high end of the scale but I think operating maxed out all the time would only serve to cause them to break down more quickly. With the MES, I've got nothing to back up my opinion and I'd like to know if I'm wrong. Just seems logical to me but seeming to be logical doesn't mean it's true.

post #23 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by daRicksta View Post
 


The reason why I don't smoke at 275° is also why I don't drive at 100 mph. Sure, my car/smoker are designed to operate at the high end of the scale but I think operating maxed out all the time would only serve to cause them to break down more quickly. With the MES, I've got nothing to back up my opinion and I'd like to know if I'm wrong. Just seems logical to me but seeming to be logical doesn't mean it's true.


Don't know if that's right or wrong, but it's the same reason I use.

Only time I use 275° is the last hour of Chicken.

 

 

Bear

post #24 of 37

I think you guys are misunderstanding me as I said that I am close to Rick @ 235-245 degrees. I don't use 275 either nor drive  my car 100 mph either, was only saying that Aaron Franklin does, and that he does in it in a different type smoker and not an electric MES.

post #25 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokesOnTuesday View Post
 

 

This is the best pic I've ever seen to show someone what TBS really looks like.


 Hi, That is a great shot of good and bad smoke. I wish I had originally posted it but only re post it occasionally.

post #26 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearcarver View Post
 


Don't know if that's right or wrong, but it's the same reason I use.

Only time I use 275° is the last hour of Chicken.

 

 

Bear


I've yet to intentionally take it up that high. Again I feel like it's pinning the controller needle to the red, to extend the automotive analogy. I will take it up to 250°. But I'm all for trying stuff that doesn't involve mods so 275° may be next on the agenda.

post #27 of 37
Thread Starter 
I preheat the smoker to 275 for 45min to 1hr then lower it after the meat goes in. I've also let it run empty for 4hrs on 275 as a cleaning mode it does cook out some of the stuff inside.
post #28 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by jted View Post
 


 Hi, That is a great shot of good and bad smoke. I wish I had originally posted it but only re post it occasionally.


LOL---That pic of Good & Bad Smoke is a Classic!! Thumbs Up

 

I've never seen a better one!  I think it's been here longer than me.

 

 

Bear

post #29 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by zzrguy View Post

I preheat the smoker to 275 for 45min to 1hr then lower it after the meat goes in. I've also let it run empty for 4hrs on 275 as a cleaning mode it does cook out some of the stuff inside.


I never preheat my MES to 275° because it both takes too long, it starts the smoker out too hot (which dissipates somewhat when I put the meat in) and then I just have to reset the controller back to my set point. I prefer to set it to my target cooking temp and then compare the temp displayed on the controller to the temp on my ET-733 and adjust the controller as needed. Bear talked about taking the temp up to 275° to finish smokes. I thought it over and I now don't see any problem with it. Masterbuilt wouldn't have allowed the temp to rise to 275° if cooking at that temp would hurt the smoker.

 

As for cleaning the smoker afterwards, I leave the door open to release all the inside heat and then I wipe the surfaces down with a Scotch green scrub sponge and/or damp paper towels. That cleans up any dried meat stuck to the walls, carbon buildup (especially on the ceiling and inside the top vent), and accumulated grease while still keeping the seasoning intact. I remove everything removable and wash them in my kitchen sink.

post #30 of 37
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by daRicksta View Post


I never preheat my MES to 275° because it both takes too long, it starts the smoker out too hot (which dissipates somewhat when I put the meat in) and then I just have to reset the controller back to my set point. I prefer to set it to my target cooking temp and then compare the temp displayed on the controller to the temp on my ET-733 and adjust the controller as needed. Bear talked about taking the temp up to 275° to finish smokes. I thought it over and I now don't see any problem with it. Masterbuilt wouldn't have allowed the temp to rise to 275° if cooking at that temp would hurt the smoker.

As for cleaning the smoker afterwards, I leave the door open to release all the inside heat and then I wipe the surfaces down with a Scotch green scrub sponge and/or damp paper towels. That cleans up any dried meat stuck to the walls, carbon buildup (especially on the ceiling and inside the top vent), and accumulated grease while still keeping the seasoning intact. I remove everything removable and wash them in my kitchen sink.
I find preheating to that temp the smoke will come back to the temp I want to run it at quicker and stay more stable then staring low and then coming back to the set temp. Mind you I see when doing rib it stabilizers quicker then when doing 2 big butts
post #31 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by daRicksta View Post
 


I never preheat my MES to 275° because it both takes too long, it starts the smoker out too hot (which dissipates somewhat when I put the meat in) and then I just have to reset the controller back to my set point. I prefer to set it to my target cooking temp and then compare the temp displayed on the controller to the temp on my ET-733 and adjust the controller as needed. Bear talked about taking the temp up to 275° to finish smokes. I thought it over and I now don't see any problem with it. Masterbuilt wouldn't have allowed the temp to rise to 275° if cooking at that temp would hurt the smoker.

 

 

 

Like I said---I only do that with Chicken---To get the skin more crisp.

I've never gone over 260° with any other meat.

 

 

Bear

post #32 of 37

I used to preheat my smoker to 240-250 degrees, but quit doing that approx a year ago. I now light my Smoke Ring from Smoke Daddy and as soon as it is smoking properly, I put it in the smoker, put the meat in the smoker, then turn on smoker and set temperature and time. This allows the meat to get more and better smoke penetration plus the smoker gets up to temp in about the same time as it does when preheating it.

post #33 of 37
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brickguy221 View Post

I used to preheat my smoker to 240-250 degrees, but quit doing that approx a year ago. I now light my Smoke Ring from Smoke Daddy and as soon as it is smoking properly, I put it in the smoker, put the meat in the smoker, then turn on smoker and set temperature and time. This allows the meat to get more and better smoke penetration plus the smoker gets up to temp in about the same time as it does when preheating it.
I'll give this a shot I have a pork butt I be brining this week.
post #34 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearcarver View Post
 

 

 

Like I said---I only do that with Chicken---To get the skin more crisp.

I've never gone over 260° with any other meat.

 

 

Bear

It's good to know chicken skin crisps at 275°. The usual suggestion is to finish it up on a grill or inside a kitchen oven. I'd rather get it all done using just one cooker.

post #35 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by zzrguy View Post


I find preheating to that temp the smoke will come back to the temp I want to run it at quicker and stay more stable then staring low and then coming back to the set temp. Mind you I see when doing rib it stabilizers quicker then when doing 2 big butts


From my experience with my MES 30 Gen 1, after reaching the set point, the heat recovers really quickly after leaving the door open to put the meat and the AMNPS in. In fact, I read that it's a myth that the more you open the door on an electric smoker the longer it takes to cook. Testing has shown that heat recovery in most electric smokers is very quick so it really doesn't extend cooking time by opening the door when needed. I've seen this happen whether I'm hot smoking any kind of meat.

post #36 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by daRicksta View Post
 

It's good to know chicken skin crisps at 275°. The usual suggestion is to finish it up on a grill or inside a kitchen oven. I'd rather get it all done using just one cooker.


I should say "Crispy enough for us". Definitely not rubbery.

 

Here's one with the Smoking Temp schedule:

 
 
Bear
post #37 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearcarver View Post
 


I should say "Crispy enough for us". Definitely not rubbery.

 

Here's one with the Smoking Temp schedule:

 
 
Bear


If only the wife was a chicken thigh fan. Still trying to educate her that thighs are more flavorful than chicken breasts.

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