or Connect
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Announcements › For New Members › How do you get "thin blue smoke" without being too high on temps?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How do you get "thin blue smoke" without being too high on temps?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

I know "thin blue smoke" is a popular question and one that's prob annoying to ask. But I have not found a direct answer to my question in regards to it. Considering to achieve the correct smoke you need a hot coals I have not been able to get the smoke to turn out correctly unless I overshoot my target temps. I just can't get the coals hot enough without having the smoker too hot. Any tips on how to do this, it's fired up right now and I need to get my ribs on but my smoke of course is too white with my smoker being at 250.

 

Thanks! 

post #2 of 17
What kind of smoker, what type of wood, how is the wood going in (chunks, wet, green, well seasoned, etc...)


Hang in there we'll get you fixed up. Also, got a pic of the smoke and smoker?
post #3 of 17
CB. Is right. It's all in the wood. You have to use seasoned dry wood or you r going to get only white dense smoke
post #4 of 17
Usually when you throw on a new split it'll smoke white until it gets burning good. Open the vents more to get it going. Sorry, but that being said, I don't know what kind of smoker you have...
Why are you not wanting to go over 250?
post #5 of 17
Be sure to pre-heat your splits before you put them into the FB. Being pre-heated will let them ignite almost instantly and not smolder. A quick ignition will keep the smoke clean.
post #6 of 17

Simply by the size of a fire...charcoal or wood split fire

post #7 of 17

First off welcome to SMF!

 

What smoker do you have?

 

Is it a stick burner or charcoal?

 

Al

post #8 of 17

Don't get hung up on color...Blue/gray, anything but dense white is fine. TBS becomes more critical with long cooks 10-12-14 hours. Some gray smoke for a 3 to 6 hour ribs smoke, especially with well seasoned wood, will taste great...JJ

post #9 of 17

If you are burning sticks then smoke will tell you everything. I call it smoke talk. I have been doing it long enough that all I have to do is look at the smoke exiting the exhaust and I know instantly if I need to do anything with the fire or if I'm running hot  or cold. Most times for me all I see is a heat signature and no smoke at all. My exhaust is always wide open and most times so is the intake. If it's windy I will shut the intakes half way. I have always been able to achieve and hold my desired temp. 250 is a sweet spot that you can't go wrong with in my opinion.

In this pic the smoke is a bit thick. But I was smoking fish that day and I was fine with it. The smoker was running at about 120 which is about as cold as I can run my stick burner. So the amount of smoke was telling me I'm not running hot.

 

post #10 of 17

If you are using a stick burner, with upper and lower air inlets to the Fire Box, the lower controls the fire, the upper can add extra air to cool the Cook Chamber and act as an after burner to clean up the smoke.....

 

post #11 of 17
I wonder if his ribs survived.... 9 replies that should have gotten him going.
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveOmak View Post

If you are using a stick burner, with upper and lower air inlets to the Fire Box, the lower controls the fire, the upper can add extra air to cool the Cook Chamber and act as an after burner to clean up the smoke.....



Dave, is there a rule of thumb for sizing area of intake for upper vents? Plan on using ball valves on an upcoming project converting to a raised stool grate design. Also, is distance above top of combustion critical? Thanks.
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by wimpy69 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveOmak View Post

If you are using a stick burner, with upper and lower air inlets to the Fire Box, the lower controls the fire, the upper can add extra air to cool the Cook Chamber and act as an after burner to clean up the smoke.....


Dave, is there a rule of thumb for sizing area of intake for upper vents? Plan on using ball valves on an upcoming project converting to a raised stool grate design. Also, is distance above top of combustion critical? Thanks.

 

80 / 20...  lower to upper...    lower below the wood grate...  Upper, across from the FB/CC inlet so the air from the upper will NOT feed the fire....  some have had to add a plate to direct the upper air higher to avoid feeding the fire.....

 

 

In your case, you can add pipe nipples to the ball valves to insure the air flow is directed properly at the FB/CC opening....

post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveOmak View Post

80 / 20...  lower to upper...    lower below the wood grate...  Upper, across from the FB/CC inlet so the air from the upper will NOT feed the fire....  some have had to add a plate to direct the upper air higher to avoid feeding the fire.....




In your case, you can add pipe nipples to the ball valves to insure the air flow is directed properly at the FB/CC opening....
Mine only has one intake, kind of low. If I were to cut a small vent at the top of the box, do you think I could get that effect?
post #15 of 17

We've hijacked this thread enough....  PM me.... 

 

Sorry for the hijack....

post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Black View Post

Be sure to pre-heat your splits before you put them into the FB. Being pre-heated will let them ignite almost instantly and not smolder. A quick ignition will keep the smoke clean.

Interesting, never thought about that except with wet wood. I will remember this. Thanks Joe

 

HT

post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoity Toit View Post

Interesting, never thought about that except with wet wood. I will remember this. Thanks Joe

HT
It really helps, HT. I always have a split on top of the firebox warming up, thanks to Joe.
Dan
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: For New Members
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Announcements › For New Members › How do you get "thin blue smoke" without being too high on temps?