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Turkey in the WSM - Page 2

post #21 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disco View Post
 

Terrific turkey, Richie and so glad you used the bones!

 

Disco

Disco Thanks I can not throw them bones away till they are done.Soup was great 2 bowls left for tonight

Richie

post #22 of 30

Birds looks simply amazing! I have a 14.5" WSM and plan to do one of these. What is the best temp to try to smoke a whole turkey?

post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by jakester View Post

Birds looks simply amazing! I have a 14.5" WSM and plan to do one of these. What is the best temp to try to smoke a whole turkey?

You'll want to be in the 325-350 range if you're looking for crisp skin. Another thing you'll want to do is dry the skin prior to cooking. Best to air dry uncovered in the fridge overnight. Dry brining can also help with this step. Another way to help dry the skin if you're not dry brinin is to add a 1/4 teaspoon of baking powder to your rub. Apply the rub a few hours prior to smoking. The powder will help dry the skin out.

To achieve those temps you may have to remove the water pan and add some other sort of diffuser in the 14".
post #24 of 30

just curious what is the difference between smoking at 325 or something like 250-275?

post #25 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by jakester View Post
 

just curious what is the difference between smoking at 325 or something like 250-275?

The lower temperatures will not rneder the fat out of the skin and you will end up with skin that is rubbery. If you don't eat the skin, or you remove the skin prior to smoking it this isn't a problem with poultry. With the lower temp smokes you also have to be careful with the size of the bird that you smoke. You need to take the bird from 40°-140° in four hours or less. That is why it is not recommended to smoke a bird larger than 14 pounds. If you are using the higher temps the size of the bird isn't as crucial. In my opinion the lower longer temp smokes can also lead to a dryer bird.

post #26 of 30

Learn something new everyday. 

post #27 of 30


Beautiful looking bird, Richie.

 

I'm thinking of taking a practice run with a turkey in the near future.  I see from previous posts that a smaller bird is better, so I will keep that in mind.  I have seen a lot of posts where people use SPOG rubs (I think that means salt, pepper, onion, garlic).  Is that the best, or most used, type of rub for turkey?  Do most people rub the outside with some kind of oil?

Can you spatchcock a turkey like you would a chicken?  I know it doesn't look as nice on the table as a bird that isn't flat, but would that make the smoke shorter? 

Since it sounds like you need to smoke a turkey at higher temps, is there anything you can do to it to keep it moist, or is smoking it quicker at higher temps enough to keep it moist?  Thanks for any help.

post #28 of 30
Hi Richie
My turkey always comes out with skin more brown than I like.
I would like to get my bird the same color as yours.
Any tips?

Thanks,
post #29 of 30
I should have noted I am using a Masterbuilt 30" two door propane smoker.
Been using apple chunks.

Thanks
post #30 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by r2 Builders View Post

Hi Richie
My turkey always comes out with skin more brown than I like.
I would like to get my bird the same color as yours.
Any tips?

Thanks,

I don't use any sugar in my rub, just Garlic salt,celery salt, onion salt, and kosher a little olive oil 

Hope that helps

Richie

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