or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Need help!!

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
So I was supposed to get my fire box for my char griller gas/charcoal/smoker combo set up, but it has t arrived yet and they're telling me that it won't be here til after the weekend. So here's my dilemma: my sons 3rd birthday is Saturday and we have about 15 people coming over who are expecting a pulled pork lunch. What do I do? Can I use the charcoal side and just do an offset smoke? Does anyone have any hacks or ideas? Also, what is the ideal cooking temp and time for pulled pork?
post #2 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by broncocoach45 View Post

So I was supposed to get my fire box for my char griller gas/charcoal/smoker combo set up, but it has t arrived yet and they're telling me that it won't be here til after the weekend. So here's my dilemma: my sons 3rd birthday is Saturday and we have about 15 people coming over who are expecting a pulled pork lunch. What do I do? Can I use the charcoal side and just do an offset smoke? Does anyone have any hacks or ideas? Also, what is the ideal cooking temp and time for pulled pork?

There ya go.. It's gonna take some impromptu learning but a butt is very forgiving anyhow. Stack them coals to the damper side and put the meat on the other..

 

Anywhere above 225 and below 300 is ideal.

2 hours per pound, but that is only a guideline. It may or may not stall so you have to be flexible. It's better to have it done early and resting in foil than to have 15 people standing by your smoker while you have two hours to go..

post #3 of 14

Yep, indirect heat.

 

Coals on one side meat on the other.

 

Throw a couple of wood chunks in the coals & it will be just as good as if you had the firebox.

 

Al

post #4 of 14
All of that sounds great. When it stalls at about 150-160*, wrap it in foil and add 1/2 cup of apple juice. The foil will help to push it through the stall. The apple juice will add moisture and flavor. The acidity will help with tenderness. I cook mine at around 250-275* and depending on the density of the muscle, it will be done when it's done. Probably 1-1/2 to 2 hours per #. Cook it to an IT of 200-205* and the bone should be really loose. That's when it's done and ready to wrap in a couple of towels and let it rest in a cooler for at least an hour to allow the juices to redistribute into the meat. After an hour or longer if you have the time, unwrap the butt and it's ready to pull and serve.

Good luck with it, Joe. grilling_smilie.gif
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thank you!!! Final question...what should I use as a rub and how long should it sit with the rub on it before putting in the smoker? This will be my first smoked pork butt.
post #6 of 14

There are several schools of thought on when to apply rub.

Some want the meat to sit overnight; others an hour or so; and yet others say - just while you are getting your smoker up to temp.

I have tried all 3 of therse and have bnot found any appreciable difference. The long/slow smoking tends to be the  great leveler......

So, for my 2 cents - since you will have your hands full preparing for a 8 - 10 hour smoke on a charcoal grill I would put the rub on whenever you have some spare time in the day of, or the day before you cook. Get that issue off your plate - it is already full...............

Good luck

post #7 of 14

You can use any rub designed for pork. 

I like to rub mine the day before so all the salts and sugars get time to dissolve and go to work. If you apply rub at the last minute, more than likely a majority of it will just fall off and make a mess. I put mine in a large plastic (Rubbermaid) container and coat it real good the night before.

Whatever you do, just give it enough time for the salt and sugar to get into the meat...

Post up some pics.... we need Q-view!! 

post #8 of 14
My suggestion for all new folks is to buy Jeff's rub and sauce recipes. They are very user friendly and can be tweaked to your personal taste. The cost of the recipes goes toward the maintenance of this great site. After you have gotten your feet a little wetter, you can branch out with other rub and sauce recipes that you develop for yourself.

As for when to rub, I usually slather my meat with plain yellow mustard and let it sit while I go start my fire prep. The mustard will form a good sticky film to hold the rub and the vinegar in the mustard will penetrate the meat to carry the spices into the meat fibers. When the mustard has set for about 1/2 hour te meat will have a shiney look. Then I put my rub on one side and do a little more fire management. After about 15 minutes the run will be mostly desolved and will be breaking down. I put my rub on the other side, do any other chores, etc and it will then probably be ready to put in the smoker.

Be sure your CC is a little above where you want to cook, you have a good bed of coals and your current addition of wood is well ignited. With those items covered, you won't have any billowing white smoke and you will have a clean fire. Always pre-heat your splits for quick ignition.

I hope this helps. It really works well for me.
post #9 of 14

Party for young folks and family, keep the Rub simple and to save time Rub the night before. See recipe below, Kid friendly. Mine put it on fries, Veggies and Popcorn...JJ

 

Mild Bubba Q Rub (All Purpose)

 

1/2C Sugar in the Raw (Turbinado)

2T Sweet Paprika (Hungarian)

1T Kosher Salt

1T Chili Powder* (contains some Cumin and Oregano) Ancho Chile is same without cumin, oregano etc.

1T Granulated Garlic

1T Granulated Onion

1tsp Black Pepper, more if you like

1/2tsp Grnd Allspice

 

For more heat add Cayenne or Chipotle Pwd to taste, start with 1/2tsp and go from there. Makes about 1 Cup

Apply your desired amount of Rub to the meat, wrap in plastic and rest in the refrigerator over night.or longer. The day of the smoke, pull the meat out, add more Rub and go into your pre-heated Smoker...

Note*...Some Chili Powders can be pretty Hot. McCormick and Spice Island are Mild...

 

post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokinAl View Post
 

Yep, indirect heat.

 

Coals on one side meat on the other.

 

Throw a couple of wood chunks in the coals & it will be just as good as if you had the firebox.

 

Al

Yes....that is the way to go!!

post #11 of 14

Maybe an omission but don't you use yellow mustard to help bind the rub on the meat.?

post #12 of 14
I use mustard on pork, EVOO on beef and either mayo or butter on poultry.

Check out my full post at #8 above.
post #13 of 14

I am following this thread, look forward to some pictures of this being your first smoke, let's not blow it, you can do this. All the suggestions above are spot on. You are on you way to your new hobby now..

 

 

HT

post #14 of 14

I'm with Joe Black - I would go indirect at 275°F until the internal temp reaches 168°F - then remove, wrap (twice) in foil and set in the oven at 250° until tender (about 192°). Tenderness is subjective, but when the thermometer probe slides in with little resistance, it's time to remove and rest the butt. Once removed, wrap in towels for about a half hour.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Pork