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how do i cook a brisket flat?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

I got 6 flats the other day and I plan on smoking them up at my hunting camp in 2 weeks for ours annual meeting. im also doing 2 butts at the same time. I've smoked plenty of pork but this will be my first shot at brisket. My plan is to set it and forget it until it hits the right temps.   


Do I just smoke the flats the same as a whole brisket? 

post #2 of 16

I'm probably in the minority, but since flats tend to dry out when smoking them.

I smoke mine in a pan sitting in some beef broth.

You still get good bark on top & plenty of smoke flavor.

You can flip it half way through if you want.

Also the juices in the pan make a great dipping sauce.



post #3 of 16
I agree smoke it in a pan to catch the juices and for easy clean up. But first you gotta inject with some beef
Broth and apply a nice rub to give it that beautiful crust
Jeffs rub is my goto or SPG with some paprika for color. Smoke with some Hickory till IT is past the stall
Take it to 170 and wrap it in butchers paper or aluminum foil and back on the smoker till 205. Then you gotta let it rest for and hour or three wrapped in a
Cooler to get all the juices happy.
Then you slice it and enjoy
Other than that . It's exactly like a pork butt..
IMHO lol
post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys i planned on rubbing it on Thursday and wrapping it in plastic wrap till Friday when I smoke it.

When should I inject the meat?

Also I wanted to do a rub with out sugar I guess like a Texas style rub. Anyone have one they like?

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post #5 of 16
Inject the night before. Texas Damation Rub
: Half cup Ground Pepper
Half cup kosher salt
Can't get more Texas than that!! ( unless you use some Red pepper for heat..)
post #6 of 16
Dalmatian. Sorry can't spell this early..
post #7 of 16
I've done two of these recently. Whole flat variety, not just a hunk off of the tip. Both of them were rubbed with salt and pepper, foiled at 160ish and pulled at 207. Both came out great but the first one was better. Differences? The first was rubbed the night before and smoked fatcap up. The second was rubbed the morning of and went fatcap down. The first had a slightly richer flavor which I attribute to rubbing the night before and allowing the salt to penetrate a little further. The second was a little "firm" in the 1/2 inch above the cap. I suspect the cap underneath insulated it just a little too much. Still came out great, though, and the leftovers made some awesome chili!! Hoe this helps and good luck!
post #8 of 16
Fat cap up if your heat comes from above , down if it comes from the bottom .. It also depends on the meat.. No two briskets are alike.. Do what I do, flip it half way
Thru the smoke.. I use a WSM so I get heat from both ends..
post #9 of 16

Howdy Lenny.

You're on the right track with the Texas Style rub. 2/3 course black pepper 1/3 kosher salt.  And thats it.


Now, in Texas we usually cook packer cuts. Lots of fat to take care of the moisture.  Flats are usually closely trimmed. So your idea of a roasting pan is spot on. 


Let the flat smoke on the grate for about 2 -4 hours depending on the size or you cut at smoker temp of 225. Then put it in your pan with some moisture. Beef broth would work. If you shake a little garlic powder and  just a touch of oregano in the broth that would be even better.  Cover the pan with foil when the internal temp hit 175 degrees. Use a thermometer to check the internal temp of you meat.


When it hits 200 degrees test your brisket for tenderness.  Just stick it with a fork. Feels tender? Take it off. Let it rest for at least 1 hour before you serve it. 


Let us know how it turns out! 


post #10 of 16
BD I'm with ya.. You Texas boys know how to cook beef!!!
post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks BD I will definitely let you all know how it goes.

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post #12 of 16

I agree 100% with salt/pepper and a good smoke being all a brisket needs.  But to mix it up I sometimes use a salt/pepper/garlic-powder rub.


After living in Texas for a few years - I have become a big fan of mesquite smoked brisket as well. BTW - I was just a "Yankee" - "Damned Yankee's" stay in Texas forever.


Never tried the flat in a pan before...so glad I read this thread.  Will definitely try that next time.

post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
Ok guys here is the 2 flats and a pork picnic that I'm smoking Friday night up at my camp.
I used Jeff's Texas rub on the flats (sorry no pic) and Jeff's rib rub on the pork.

I have hickory for my wood I also have oak up at camp but I'd have to cut it so I just grabbed a bag of chunks at bass pro. Got my new igrill 2 all set up and ready too. I plan on doing just as BD said to so Im sure it will come out great!


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post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
The briskets came out really good but took a little longer then I thought they would. I started them at 6:30am and they didn't finish up till about 3:00pm

I didn't get very good smoked ring cause I had leave and go do some work around my camp. I wasn't sure if I'd be back in time to foil them at 175 so I foiled them at 140. But all in all they were great. Everyone really liked them.

I didn't get any picks of it sliced cause by that time it was dark out.


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post #15 of 16

They look great!

post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks! Next time I want time try to do them without foil.

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