or Connect
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Smoking Meat (and other things) › Beef › First Brisket Successful But...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

First Brisket Successful But...

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

So I did my first brisket on the weekend and it turned out better than I had hoped but there were some hiccups along the way and I've got some questions to help improve the next (although everyone loved this one :drool)  Here's the thread from the smoke: http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/246688/first-brisket-wish-me-luck

 

Before I get into the questions, I just want to thank everyone who gave me advice when I was getting ready for the smoke.  You are a wealth of knowledge and I'm glad I've found you!

 

First question:  I separated the point from the flat and was disappointed by how small the flat was.  Is it common for the flat to be significantly smaller than the point?  Got it from a reputable butcher.

 

Second... I had a 30* rise in IT in an hour and a half (160* to 190*) with no stall.  When it happened I had just panned it and foiled it and had added about 8 ounces of beer to the mix.  Is a quick rise with no stall the result of the bath and foil tent or did I get lucky there?

 

Third... This was only the second smoke with my WSM (second ever actually).  For the most part I was able to keep temps steady but it would slowly stray up or down and so I'd make slight vent adjustments here and there to keep it in the range I wanted.  I read everywhere that these things are "set it and forget it".  I'm I having to make adjustments because it isn't seasoned enough?  The first smoke I used lump charcoal and the second I used briquettes because I read that they are more consistent then lump.

 

Last... I tried to make Burnt Ends and they were fantastic tasting but super moist.  I was expecting them to be tougher (harder) almost like a jerky nugget or something like that.  Basically I cubed a part of the point, coated with a KC Rub then tossed in Uncle Dougie's Sweet and Snappy BBQ sauce.  Then foiled and threw the whole mess on the smoker for about two hours.  They were super tasty but, like I said, just not what I had expected.  Any tips on improving the texture of these for next time?

 

Thanks for all your help!

post #2 of 10

Every brisket will be a little different, but in the few I've separated myself the point is usually only about 1/3 or a little more of the total packer.  I think it tends to be thicker than the flat, but seems to run about half (or a little more) of the total length of the packer.

 

As far as burnt ends, those sound perfect to me.  The best ones I've had and made myself look like little jerky nuggets, but are still very juicy and tender.  So to me you did them perferct, but that is just me.  Can leave them uncovered (I do) and they may firm up a little bit more.  There are people who have done way more than I have, and can probably give you more advise.  But again to me those sound about perfect.

post #3 of 10

Morning DU...I've tried to answer each question below in RED.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by DesiredUsername View Post
 

So I did my first brisket on the weekend and it turned out better than I had hoped but there were some hiccups along the way and I've got some questions to help improve the next (although everyone loved this one :drool)  Here's the thread from the smoke: http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/246688/first-brisket-wish-me-luck

 

Before I get into the questions, I just want to thank everyone who gave me advice when I was getting ready for the smoke.  You are a wealth of knowledge and I'm glad I've found you!

 

First question:  I separated the point from the flat and was disappointed by how small the flat was.  Is it common for the flat to be significantly smaller than the point?  Got it from a reputable butcher.

 

Every brisket will vary, but it often depends on how you are trimming and cutting it.  There's a wide vein of fat that runs roughly diagonally through a whole packer.  That's the divider between the point and flat...is that where you separated?  If you cut straight through the packer from top to bottom, you actually may have ended up with part of flat still attached to the point.

 

Second... I had a 30* rise in IT in an hour and a half (160* to 190*) with no stall.  When it happened I had just panned it and foiled it and had added about 8 ounces of beer to the mix.  Is a quick rise with no stall the result of the bath and foil tent or did I get lucky there?

 

Tough one to answer because there's no real hard and fast rule.  Every brisket will behave differently.  The last packer I did was similar to yours...no stall and it got to 200* IT much faster than expected - even though I did not foil it.  But in the past, I've had briskets that stalled out for up to a couple of hours with no real increase in IT.  I'd say, however, that the foil and bath method you used probably contributed...foiling a brisket with some liquid will, as a general rule, speed up the cook time.

 

Third... This was only the second smoke with my WSM (second ever actually).  For the most part I was able to keep temps steady but it would slowly stray up or down and so I'd make slight vent adjustments here and there to keep it in the range I wanted.  I read everywhere that these things are "set it and forget it".  I'm I having to make adjustments because it isn't seasoned enough?  The first smoke I used lump charcoal and the second I used briquettes because I read that they are more consistent then lump.

 

After a few cooks on that WSM, those temps should even out and get more steady.  You're right on the mark...it takes a little seasoning in those cookers before they seal up properly.  

 

In general, I find that briq charcoal burns longer and a bit more consistently, but produces more ash...while lump tends to burn hotter, and shorter, with less ash...and IMO tastes better than briqs.

 

Last... I tried to make Burnt Ends and they were fantastic tasting but super moist.  I was expecting them to be tougher (harder) almost like a jerky nugget or something like that.  Basically I cubed a part of the point, coated with a KC Rub then tossed in Uncle Dougie's Sweet and Snappy BBQ sauce.  Then foiled and threw the whole mess on the smoker for about two hours.  They were super tasty but, like I said, just not what I had expected.  Any tips on improving the texture of these for next time?

 

You may be a bit confused about what burnt ends are.  All the burnt ends I've ever had are tender and moist.  I don't think I'd care for them much if they were tough.  If you want to improve the texture (and IMO the taste as well), leave the foil off.  They'll take on some more smoke, and they'll also firm up a little more as they cook.

 

Thanks for all your help!

 

 

Hope that helps...happy smoking!  Thumbs Up

 

Red


Edited by SeenRed - 5/24/16 at 7:49am
post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jirod View Post
 

Every brisket will be a little different, but in the few I've separated myself the point is usually only about 1/3 or a little more of the total packer.  I think it tends to be thicker than the flat, but seems to run about half (or a little more) of the total length of the packer.

 

So I wonder if, being that this is the first time I've ever even looked at a brisket, I got the two confused?  My brisket had one side with hardly any fat on it and the opposite had a thick layer of fat covering it.  The part that was directly connected to the fat is the point right?  If that's the case it was double the size of the flat.  lol I may have done this completely backwards :hit:

 

Here's a pic with rub before it hit the smoker... I outlined the part I thought was the flat. Fat side is on the bottom.  

 

 

Thanks for the tip about keeping the burnt ends uncovered... makes sense, will do that next time!  Having a burnt end sandwich for lunch today.

post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by DesiredUsername View Post
 

 

So I wonder if, being that this is the first time I've ever even looked at a brisket, I got the two confused?  My brisket had one side with hardly any fat on it and the opposite had a thick layer of fat covering it.  The part that was directly connected to the fat is the point right?  If that's the case it was double the size of the flat.  lol I may have done this completely backwards :hit:

 

Here's a pic with rub before it hit the smoker... I outlined the part I thought was the flat. Fat side is on the bottom.  

 

 

Thanks for the tip about keeping the burnt ends uncovered... makes sense, will do that next time!  Having a burnt end sandwich for lunch today.

 

Not positive from just the one pic, but I don't think that's a whole packer.  Its common to buy a brisket flat that's already been separated from the point, and I believe that's what you had there.

 

There are plenty of good videos on Youtube about briskets...from trimming, to rubs, to smoking, to slicing.  Here's a good one that might help you:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SM0pGO_3Fa4

 

You can search briskets on youtube and get lots of good videos to help make your next cook go better...

 

Red

post #6 of 10

Here's a good tutorial about how to break down a full packer I found on here awhile ago.  One of the first pics shows kind of how they are layed out together.

 

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/94908/separating-a-brisket

post #7 of 10
BBQ with Franklin on YouTube. A lot of BBQ tips from a guy that will soon be a legend if not already in Texas.
There's a reason people stand in line outside in the Texas heat for hours to get his BBQ.
post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeenRed View Post
 

 

Not positive from just the one pic, but I don't think that's a whole packer.  Its common to buy a brisket flat that's already been separated from the point, and I believe that's what you had there.

 

Hey Red...There were two distinct parts to it separated by a thick line of fat so I suspect the flat might have been larger if it had been left whole.  In fact, it looked exactly like the picture below (thanks jirod for the link :) )

 

 

That Malcolm Reed video was one of the best I've seen.  Subscribed to the channel too.  I think I may try his method next time and go with a whole packer.

 

TexasGrey... Thanks for the tip on BBQ with Franklin.  Very informative.  You guys are awesome.  Looks like my brisket just had a smaller flat.  lol just glad my wife wasn't judging size :rotflmao:

post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeenRed View Post
 

 

 

Hope that helps...happy smoking!  Thumbs Up

 

Red

Holy crap!  Thanks Red!  That was a lot of good info!  You replied while I was replying to some of the other comments.

 

Quote:
 There's a wide vein of fat that runs roughly diagonally through a whole packer.  That's the divider between the point and flat...is that where you separated?  

That's exactly where I separated.  Should have taken a picture of both after separating but was anxious to get them back in the smoker.

post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by DesiredUsername View Post
 

Hey Red...There were two distinct parts to it separated by a thick line of fat so I suspect the flat might have been larger if it had been left whole.  In fact, it looked exactly like the picture below (thanks jirod for the link :) )

 

 

That Malcolm Reed video was one of the best I've seen.  Subscribed to the channel too.  I think I may try his method next time and go with a whole packer.

 

OK...that's a better view.  Must have been a packer...just looks like it was on the smallish side.  I'd say you're right...it just had a smaller flat.

 

I'm a subscriber to Malcolm Reed too!  He puts out some very informative and easy to follow vids on smoking all kinds of meats.

 

Red

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Beef
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Smoking Meat (and other things) › Beef › First Brisket Successful But...