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Hickory smoked orange pork.

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
This started off with me remembering that I've always wanted to roast a pork but in banna leaves.



So first I got this nice 10 pound pork shoulder, could not get butt, I cleaned it and skinned it, then made little scores and put in some whole cloves, (one per).

While I let it drie, I whipped up a homemade orange bitters marinade, consisting of both Florida and California oranges, grape fruit, brown sugar, jalapeño, cilantro, nut meg, cinnamon stick, molasses, fresh ginger, fresh garlic, clove, coke,

got my 30 quart pot and






^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^added weight^^^^^^^^^^^
Let sit in my fridge for 24 hrs

Day 2 ;)

Got my banna leaves defrosted and set them up two horizontal and two vertical


Took the pork out to dry


Placed in the middle of the leaves and sliced jalapeño on top



Off to the smoker


Had the smoker preheating at 200, added some wood water and orange peel to the water pan and brought it up to a steady 245 degrees.

I'm using hickory chunks, using my cast iron pan between 230 and 250 I was getting nice even light smoke, each Bach lasted an hour.

I hit a max of 249 degrees at one point when the water ran low, and a low of 233 at a point when the sun left my yard, the new thermometer with temp arms is awesome helped me put alot.

8.5 hrs later



I stabbed my digital thermometer into what felt the three deep parts and hit 155 to 160 so I pulled the pork and let it rest

After opening I had realized that I flipped it and never flipped it back to fat side up when I put it in the smoke so it cooked fat side down, but it was still tender and juicy.


Day three
I had covered the pork up and left it in the pan after we tasted it, and put away for the next day. I proceed to heat it up now at 200 degrees for about an hour and a half, then uncovered it and boosted the heat to 375, for a half hour. I whipped up a homemade bbq sauce using blue moon and oranges, some corn on the cob, honey corn muffins, and roasted red potatoes. The pork stayed juicy and tender, the hickory was light not overwhelming, and the banna leaves added a nice flavor. The blue moon bbq sauce surprising to me went really good together, it had that twang the pork needed.

I be leave that I should of smoked the meat much longer need to find like a guide per pound or something. Drop a comment let me know what you guys think.
post #2 of 7

Sounds like a tasty combination of flavors. If your goal was to Slice the meat, the IT of 165 is fine. If a Pulled Pork was the goal then taking it to an IT of 200-205°F would be your destination. At the smoker temp range you were using 1.5 to 2.0 Hours Per Pound Pork is a typical guideline to get Pulled Pork...JJ

post #3 of 7
Looks tasty! I agree with everything JJ said.

For your temp swings look into getting a needle valve for your smoker. It makes a huge difference. This particular one is from Bayou Classic.



After installed you leave your original control open on high. Use the new valve on the hose to control the flow of the fuel. Make very small adjustments. I can run my propane smoker anywhere from 120-500+ with very little tending.

I would also suggest not using water in your water pan. Leave it dry and wrap in foil for easy clean up. As you noticed the water evaporates and the temp of the pit rises. There is no need to have water in a smoker. You'll get nice moist meat without it as long as you cook it to the proper IT.
post #4 of 7

It looks good!

 

I like the ingredients!

 

Al

post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtsailor2003 View Post

Looks tasty! I agree with everything JJ said.

For your temp swings look into getting a needle valve for your smoker. It makes a huge difference. This particular one is from Bayou Classic.



After installed you leave your original control open on high. Use the new valve on the hose to control the flow of the fuel. Make very small adjustments. I can run my propane smoker anywhere from 120-500+ with very little tending.

I would also suggest not using water in your water pan. Leave it dry and wrap in foil for easy clean up. As you noticed the water evaporates and the temp of the pit rises. There is no need to have water in a smoker. You'll get nice moist meat without it as long as you cook it to the proper IT.



Yoo man seriously I have that exact regulator lol, It took me days driving around my neighborhood looking for a needle valve and ended up finding this, awesome price of equiptment. Thank you for the advice on the water , it's something I've been wondering about. My next smoke will be minus the water thankyou.
Happy smoking
post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef JimmyJ View Post

Sounds like a tasty combination of flavors. If your goal was to Slice the meat, the IT of 165 is fine. If a Pulled Pork was the goal then taking it to an IT of 200-205°F would be your destination. At the smoker temp range you were using 1.5 to 2.0 Hours Per Pound Pork is a typical guideline to get Pulled Pork...JJ

Frickin awesome, my pork never pulls apart it's always nice to Slice but not really stringy, thank you.
post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokinAl View Post

It looks good!

I like the ingredients!

Al

Thank you, don't know what went threw my head when I was building the recipe. But it damn sure worked out. I'm tweeking it a little so I can come up with more or less exact amounts of everything and then I'm going to post the recipe if anyone finds it interesting enough to try.
Thank you for the motivational comments.
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