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price for making bologna

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

I have the opportunity to make venison bologna for other people. Wondering how to go about charging per lbs. Before the process or after. With the price of pork up & down how do I keep fair price for everybody. Don't want 1 guy saying he got it .08 cheaper per lb.

post #2 of 15

Well, in all fairness, it's a commodity and the market fluctuates just like it does at the grocery store.  Gasoline, coffee, meat, it's all the same principal and the market sets the price.   It sure would be nice if we were guaranteed the lowest price for everything we buy for say the next 5 years, but that's not the real world. A couple of weeks ago gas was $1.45 a gallon here, but now it's back in the $1.70's.  So my question to the $0.08 cent guy is why did he not buy when the price was lower instead of hesitating and now having regrets.  And does anyone really expect you to not reflect the increase (or decrease for that matter) in material prices in the final pricing of the finished product?  I would let everyone with interest know this up front though and pass on price decreases too (yeah, like that happens now days).

post #3 of 15
What I would do is figure out the highest pork has been, mark that up by 3, and call it good. The additional mark up covers your time and fuel etc to acquire the meat and the time to process it, also equipment, insurance, etc. if the price of pork goes up more than 10-15% then adjust your price.

Another route to go is to have whoever you are making it for purchase the pork.
post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 

THANKS for the feed back guys. After reading your thoughts I don't no why it didn't dawn on me before (never charged before because it was family) I'll give price up front & they can take it or leave it. I'm sure people will like having their on meat used instead of a huge community batch. I've seen what some guys throw in there meat to make weight for that. Wouldn't even want to sample that. How do I charge for rest of supplies? Double or triple? I like the idea of tripling pork price. That way if it works out I'm good for a few years. Again thanks for all input

post #5 of 15

The Pro's come up with a standard recipe they plan to use and Cost Out the recipe. THAT price is then tripled to cover labor, fuel and profit. Set it up on Excel then you can modify the cost of ingredients and the program will tell you what to charge. Also adding the weight of Venison given, Excel will automatically recalc the weight of each ingredient so the outcome is consistant...JJ

post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 

That's great Jimmy but I dont have a clue about excel. Not sure I would be able to set this up

post #7 of 15

Get your recipe down with Weights for each ingredient in Grams. A gram scale is available from Amazon for under $15. Purchase your ingredients but keep track of what each ingredient cost and the weight of the container. McCormick Granulated Garlic, 200g container for $5.99. From that point, I can work with you on costing it out and show you an easy way to convert the recipe for any amount of Venison a customer brings. I've taught costing for years and will have no problem teaching you what you need to do. It all starts with a Recipe. All the math is simple add, subtract, multiply and divide...JJ

post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 

WOW JJ u r like a mind reader. I broke out my gram scale this afternoon & did just that. Only ingredients I didn't do was the the ones that take a Tbs. of this & a tsp. of that. Have to go to store to get prices on them. I added it all up then multiplied by 3. Came up with the total of w/o cheese $49.89 & with cheese $67.89. This is the times 3 total. I believe my prices will be w/o $60 & with $75. Does this sound about right to u?? Greatly appreciate u offering the help. I do enjoy smoking & making stuff for others just not sure it would be enjoyable to me  if it turned into a scheduled job. I already have a full time one.  I do have spare time after hunting season from mid Dec. to mid March for this. Like I said before I'll put it out there & see what happens. Just don't want  it to big. Can always say NO!

Again THANKS,

Duane Smith

post #9 of 15
I've been asked by many to do the same thing... As with you.. I stumble when it comes time for prices... but then I start thinking about some of the legal stuff.... as soon as I start thinking about that.. I give up and say ... no thanks.. not at this point and time... but I am still interested in this thread and the results...
post #10 of 15

$60 and 75 for How Much? If that is for 10 Lbs, that's in the right neighborhood for an Artisan Bologna in PA, maybe a little high using Pork and the customer provides the Venison. The price below is made in house, purchased and out the door. So, with over half the meat provided, you should be Half the price of below +/-. Call Wenger's and Diller's and see what they are getting to make Deer Bologna...JJ

 

http://www.kiefersmeats.com/meats 

 

Lancaster County Old Fashion Sweet Bagged Bologna

Old fashioned bagged sweet bologna is made with all lean beef. The beef is wrapped in a cloth bag and smoked over hickory wood to give it a natural smoky flavor. This bologna boasts delicious flavor and has multiple uses. Have it sliced thin for sandwiches or extra thick for frying to make the perfect sweet bologna melt. Cut into cubes for party trays or simply cut off a piece and enjoy as a snack on the go.

Click here to buy 

$13.99 per pound


Edited by Chef JimmyJ - 3/14/16 at 6:06pm
post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 

The recipe is 12#  venison & 4# boston butt plus if wanted 1.5# cheese. Just checked wenger's & I'm a few dollars high on both. Their price is $3.29 w/o cheese & $3.99 w. Not sure if thats before adding meat or after. They do say that they can not keep meat separate for bologna because it takes to much time & expense.


Edited by Buzzy - 3/15/16 at 4:46pm
post #12 of 15

If they are like TWIN PINES in Seven Valleys York Co, that is probably the price per pound, Beef/Pork, Spices and Labor included. I would pay $60 for 16 lbs of Bologna made from My Deer. By Wenger's price you are a bit high but the premium is worth it for getting a guarantee of using only my Deer. I used to hunt Corn and Soy Bean fed Deer in a small patch of woods surrounded by Farms. The meat was very mild and sweet. Would be worth the extra $ not to have it mixed with woodland deer meat...JJ

post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 

JJ again thanks for the help & guidance. I'm going to start putting this out there & see what happens come fall. I do believe guys will pay premium for just their meat in the bologna. 

post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buzzy View Post
 

JJ again thanks for the help & guidance. I'm going to start putting this out there & see what happens come fall. I do believe guys will pay premium for just their meat in the bologna. 

Good Luck. What you going to do when 10-15 guys show up? That is a lot of meat to hold cold, especially during Bow Season. This past Rifle season was unusually warm as well. Get and keep your Ducks in a Row. Keep your work space Clean and Sanitize between runs. Keep the meat Cold...Before, During, and After processing. Your responsibility to handle safely goes way up when you are getting payed to smoke some sticks. .I would hate to read about you losing your house and saving to a Food Poisoning lawsuit!

I don't think I will be walking around hunting anymore, bad Arthritus, but I plan to move back to Central PA and if a Deer was to fall over dead in my yard from Acute Lead Poisoning this fall, I'll be in touch...JJ:biggrin:

post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 

I'm thinking that many guys in the season. I need time to hunt. Remember the just say NO policy. I'm sure the inspectors wouldn't like my set up but we do keep it clean with a lot of bleach spray & cold temps. U want a batch made get in contact. S. Central Pa offers a lot of good hunting. Hate to hear of limiting ur hunting because of a immobility. Some good properties for sale u could make ur own hunting sanctuary.

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