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Asian-style spicy beef jerky

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Spicy Asian-style Jerky Marinade

for 5lbs meat


10 oz Tamari or gluten free Soy (1 bottle of San-J brand)

4 oz Worcestershire sauce

2 Tbl Fresh-cracked black pepper

2 Tbl Sirracha sauce (sweet)

1 Tbl Sirracha sauce (hot)

2 Tbl Harry’s habenaro hot sauce (used Melinda’s)

2-3 Tbl Gochujang (kochi jung) Korean chili pepper paste

2 Tbl Fish sauce

½ cup of dry white wine

1 tsp (level) Cure#1 dissolved in ½ cup of water


I put all the ingredients except the cure#1 and water in a blender and blended on high until all of the ingredients were well mixed. I wanted to be able to taste the marinade to make sure I liked it before adding the cure. Poured out the blender into a bowl and added the cure#1 and water and whisked it well.


I ran into the butcher while shopping for London broil and eye-round. He suggested that since bottom round was on sale that I give that a shot instead of the eye-round. He even offered to slice it all for me. What a deal. Got the meat, 1.5 lb London broil and 3.5 lb bottom round plus the tamari, for $24. All of the other times that I’ve made jerky I’ve always used London broil. It’ll be interesting to see how this comes out. The bottom round did have more fat in it but it still was pretty lean.


Took the meat out of the fridge and “dredged” each piece in the marinade so that they were well coated. Put each piece into a 2 gallon zip-lock bag. Poured in the remaining marinade when all the meat was coated. Got all the air out and mixed it around a bit.


It’s in fridge now. I’m thinking about putting it into one of the canisters that came with my vacuum sealer. I’ve heard that if you vacuum seal the canister that the meat will take marinade better. Might try that tonight. Anyone else do it that way?   


My goal is to dry it in the smoker tomorrow for an hour. Then smoke it for an hour. I’ll finish it in my dehydrator at 165 degrees for about 4 hours. It should be smoked and dried by then.


Q-view pictures tomorrow when things get interesting. 

post #2 of 12

I like the recipe, it sounds really good.


Looking forward to the finale!



post #3 of 12

Sounds Great, Cue!!


Personally, I would smoke it longer.


Be Back:






post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 
Originally Posted by Bearcarver View Post

Sounds Great, Cue!!


Personally, I would smoke it longer.


Be Back:






Thanks Al and Bear. Bear, you're probably right. I think the last batch I did, I smoked for 2 hours. They had a nice smoke taste but not overpowering. Two hours it is. 

post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

Some Q-view for interested parties.  



Have the meat and marinade sealed up to make it easier to overhaul. 



In a bowl ready for 24 hour rest in the refrigerator. 




Have the smoker rack set up on a rubbermaid container to

make it easier to skewer with toothpicks and hang.



The meat all skewered and ready to go hang out and dry. 



Have the smoker warmed up at 185 degrees. 



Slid the rack in carefully and never lost a piece of meat. 



Microwaved the pellets since I've had some trouble of late

keeping them lit initially. I'm using a canning funnel that fits

around the smoking tube to fill the mic'd pellets. It makes 

much less of a mess and you don't have to cleanup the 

stray pellets. 




Starting the smoke after an hour of drying. I thought I gave it

enough time to drip into the rubbermaid container but from the 

stuff on the foil, it must have needed more time. 



I'm planning on  a two hour smoke and then four hours or so in the dehydrator at 165 degrees.


I'll post some pictures when it's done. I do notice that the gochujang or kochi jang.has really

left the meat a nice shade of red. I'll be interested to see if it holds that color when done.

post #6 of 12

CIC, Looking good !!!

post #7 of 12
Looks tasty.
post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the encouragement dirt and crazy. 


Next step. Into the dehydrator. I was wrong when I said 165 degrees, it's highest setting is the jerky-setting at 160. Also, if anyone cares, I used The Perfect Mix pellets from cookinpellets.com. They're hickory, cherry, hard maple, and apple. 


In 4 to 5 hours I should be able to show you what "done" looks like. In the mean time here's some more pics of what's going on. 



Out of the smoker. Using the rubbermaid container to carry

them around so that they don't end up on the floor. 



In the dehydrator at 160 degrees for 4 hours. They still look

pretty red. At first, I was concerned that they weren't cooked.

They still looked rare. When you felt them though you could 

tell by the texture that they were cooked. 

post #9 of 12

Nice looking jerky on the way!



post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 

Disco thanks. It came out pretty good.



Since it was 65 degrees and 13% humidity, I decided to run

the dehydrator outside on top of the smoker. 





The reddish color was pretty much lost. As it dried it got darker

but there's still some red left in the patina. 


It was tasty but not as spicy as I would have thought. I think

next time I need to bump up the amount of kochi jung, sirracha

and habenaro hot sauce. The wine and water may have 

diluted the effect. 


All in all, I think it came out pretty good. 

post #11 of 12
Nice finish. I get good red meat color when I do jerky. I don't use a dehydrator. I use the smoker straight through. Typically use cherry which adds a good red tone to the meat.

White pepper really adds a nice kick to jerky. I use it more than black pepper.

I was curious about adding the water. It may dilute your heat. I dissolve the cure in just the fish sauce I use.
post #12 of 12

Great Q Views all the way through. Nicely executed!


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