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IR Therm

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I wanted to get something to monitor the temp of the Discada. Since it is shallow and there isn't a good way to get a probe in the thing I decide to buy a IR therm.

I purchased Mine off Amazon. I picked the one with the best reviews and number one sold. It cost $15.99 with no shipping on prime.

I was skeptical I opened the packing box that weighed nothing. However I have been pleasantly surprised. It's very accurate. I have tested it against my other therms and its within 1 degree. It takes 3-5 seconds to get a solid reading. I've found myself running around the house shooting everything to check temps for no reason. I'll probably wear out the two AAA batteries that came with it just temping dumb stuff.

Now for the purpose that I bought it for. It works great. I can get an accurate reading and know what temp my disk or the oil in the disk is. I can see using this for checking temps in the DO too. I'm really particular when I want to fry onion rings or taters. Now I have a great way to check the temp of the oil.

It's easy to use, no complicated instructions or buttons. Has a red dot laser sight so you know where you are reading the temp from. Auto on, auto off. Just pull the trigger and shoot.

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Smoke away!!!
post #2 of 15

Nice buy, Case. I had no idea an IR therm would read oil temps, that's pretty handy dandy!!

post #3 of 15
I bought one a few years ago. Really handy around the smoker, grill, engine compartment.

RG
post #4 of 15

I bought one of these a few years ago, just because it looked like fun. It turns out it is indeed fun, but it is also really useful. If mine ever decides to fail, I'll get another one before the end of the same day.

 

Here's how I use mine:

 

  • Know when skillet has reached 350 degrees (low-end temp for searing)
  • Find out how cold fridge and freezer are (just point at something that has been in there for a few days
  • Find out if something is cool enough to touch
  • Get oil temp in deep fat fryer (it matches my Thermapen almost exactly)
  • See how hot my batteries have gotten when charging, and reduce charge rate if they are too hot
  • Measure temperature of various parts inside my computer to track down overheating issue

 

I've used it in dozens of other ways. I now use it almost every day for something.

 

The only downside is that it cannot accurately measure the temperature of a shiny surface, so if you point it at a stainless steel skillet, you cannot get an accurate reading until there is actually something IN the skillet. However, it gives perfect readings for cast iron, non-stick pans, etc.

post #5 of 15

Sounds like a must have new toy! :sausage:

 

Al

post #6 of 15

 I bought mine from Harbor Freight several years ago and the uses are endless. Besides the uses in the kitchen, it's great in the workshop.

 

Chuck

 

post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 

One thing I haven't figured out yet is it says 58° is the lowest it goes. However I have shot things (interior of refer) and it appears to work below that. I was getting readings of 38°-41° which when checked with my other therms was spot on.

post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnmeyer View Post
 

I bought one of these a few years ago, just because it looked like fun. It turns out it is indeed fun, but it is also really useful. If mine ever decides to fail, I'll get another one before the end of the same day.

 

Here's how I use mine:

 

  • Know when skillet has reached 350 degrees (low-end temp for searing)
  • Find out how cold fridge and freezer are (just point at something that has been in there for a few days
  • Find out if something is cool enough to touch
  • Get oil temp in deep fat fryer (it matches my Thermapen almost exactly)
  • See how hot my batteries have gotten when charging, and reduce charge rate if they are too hot
  • Measure temperature of various parts inside my computer to track down overheating issue

 

I've used it in dozens of other ways. I now use it almost every day for something.

 

The only downside is that it cannot accurately measure the temperature of a shiny surface, so if you point it at a stainless steel skillet, you cannot get an accurate reading until there is actually something IN the skillet. However, it gives perfect readings for cast iron, non-stick pans, etc.


here is another handy use, if you have a dual rear tire rig it is nice when you make a stop you simply shoot the outside tire and then shoot the inside tire. the temps should be the same or you have either tire pressure issues or with the load on (or soft tire) the sidewalls are rubbing at hwy speeds, either way a problem starting to happen.

 

Tom 

post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtsailor2003 View Post
 

One thing I haven't figured out yet is it says 58° is the lowest it goes. However I have shot things (interior of refer) and it appears to work below that. I was getting readings of 38°-41° which when checked with my other therms was spot on.


I think it's a minus 58 degrees as in below zero? It does have the minus (-) sign in front of the 58.

post #10 of 15

I like it, I've got one pretty useful around the house too

 

Gary

post #11 of 15

I've had one for a few years... Yes, they are very handy.

post #12 of 15
I bought a high temp IR therm to check the exhaust temp on my tractor... After hard pulls, it would keep running when it was shut down... The high speed jet was too lean... the exhaust temp showed it so I turned up the fuel, it ran better and now I won't be melting pistons... OOOOO RAH...
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveOmak View Post

I bought a high temp IR therm to check the exhaust temp on my tractor... After hard pulls, it would keep running when it was shut down... The high speed jet was too lean... the exhaust temp showed it so I turned up the fuel, it ran better and now I won't be melting pistons... OOOOO RAH...


That's an interesting use. That is the same technique used in small piston-driven airplanes to set the fuel air mixture: you use an exhaust manifold temperature gauge to set the correct mixture.

post #14 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3montes View Post
 


I think it's a minus 58 degrees as in below zero? It does have the minus (-) sign in front of the 58.

Ha! well looky there! Brain not registering after working with numbers all day long! :hit:

post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtsailor2003 View Post
 

Ha! well looky there! Brain not registering after working with numbers all day long! :hit:

 

I had to look at it a couple times myself before I noticed. Just ordered one myself. I have a Santa Maria grill coming that has a 24" flat top griddle with it as a accessory so I want to know the surface temp of the griddle. Otherwise I have gotten along just fine without one. I'm a no gadget kind of a guy. :biggrin:

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