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Salmon recipes

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Hey everyone! I am wanting to smoke some salmon in my smoker. Does anybody have a good recipe with maybe a teriyaki type of brine for the salmon? Also I was curious to what temp and how long salmon takes since I am new to the smoking game! Thank you very much for the input!!
post #2 of 12

Welcome to SMF.   If you click on the following, you'll enter the fish forum, where there are tons of Salmon recipes.  I personally use a simple dry mixture of dark brown sugar and non iodized salt at a 4/1 ratio  (sugar/salt).  If we are talking filet pieces, I normally start out at 125-130* for the first hour, bump it up to 145* for the second hour, bump it up to 155-160* for the 3rd hour until I reach an IT (Internal Temp) of 140*

 

Lots of ideas here:

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/f/103/fish

post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmayna View Post

Welcome to SMF.   If you click on the following, you'll enter the fish forum, where there are tons of Salmon recipes.  I personally use a simple dry mixture of dark brown sugar and non iodized salt at a 4/1 ratio  (sugar/salt).  If we are talking filet pieces, I normally start out at 125-130* for the first hour, bump it up to 145* for the second hour, bump it up to 155-160* for the 3rd hour until I reach an IT (Internal Temp) of 140*

Lots of ideas here:
http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/f/103/fish
Thank you very much I appreciate it!!
post #4 of 12
Quote:
 I personally use a simple dry mixture of dark brown sugar and non iodized salt at a 4/1 ratio  (sugar/salt).

I'll second that. 

I've smoked a lot of salmon and have tried all kinds of recipes but settled on the simple brown sugar and salt for both quality and convenience. I actually use a 5/1 ratio mostly because the sugar I buy comes in 2 pound bags (5 cups) and I can just dump in all in a mixing bowl with 1 cup of salt, but I've done 4/1 and its also very good. 

Spread a 1/4" layer of the sugar/salt mix on the bottom of a pyrex lasagna pan. Lay the fish in a single layer on top and cover it completely with more of the sugar/salt mix. Put the pan in the fridge overnight (not longer! If you soak it too long and it will be too salty, especially if your ratio is heavier on the salt side) and you will see that the dry mix has become liquid. Brush off the chunks, do not rinse, lay the fish on your smoker racks and crack some black pepper on top. If you really like it sweet and sticky like my kids do you can baste it with maple syrup or honey about halfway through the smoke. 

post #5 of 12

I usually drizzle a little maple syrup on,  a little Chef Prudhommes salmon seasoning and  it comes out great!   I use alder wood and a little cedar.  I like it orange and smokie!! 

post #6 of 12

Night Fish,

Do you let it dry for a couple hours after brining before it goes into the smoker?

 

Craig

post #7 of 12
Quote:
 Night Fish,

Do you let it dry for a couple hours after brining before it goes into the smoker?

Sometimes I do, sometimes I don't.

I know that the pellicle is a big deal to some folks but I've found that for me it isn't worth fussing over. To be completely honest, I can hardly tell the difference in the end product with or without it. Maybe I'm missing something...

 

One very influential factor is how you cut the fish. My kids like it prepared in way that they call salmon candy. This is not the traditional Indian salmon candy that you might be thinking of. To make our version of salmon candy I cut the fillet from top (dorsal) to bottom (ventral) into slabs about 4-5" long. Then I slice those chunks horizontally (head to tail) in strips about 1/2" thick. The strips are smoked well done (by look and feel, not IT) and heavily basted with syrup at least twice during the smoke. It comes out like a super sticky and super sweet salmon jerky ... no wonder the kids love it. One of these days I'll to a tutorial for the forum.

 

I also like our salmon candy. I'll vacuum seal and freeze it in single serving size packages and then pack it in the boat or in my pocket when fishing on the river. It makes an excellent power snack in the field. However, when smoking salmon for myself I usually slice it thicker, skip the syrup, increase the cracked pepper, and smoke it less so that it isn't so dried out jerky style.  

 

Another interesting point is how storage in the fridge or freezer changes the texture of smoked salmon. It's always absolutely delicious straight out of the smoker. However, the jerky style can sometimes seem too dry for my taste. If you leave it in the fridge overnight the oils seem to "come out" and permeate through the meat and make it moist again. Freezing and thawing does the same thing but more so.   

 

Hudson - You use cedar in the smoker? I was always under the impression that cedar isn't suitable for smoking. I used alder or hickory exclusively for years but recently made the move to cherry when I took down a few big cherry trees in my yard. Who knows. Maybe someday I'll go back to the old favorites. 

post #8 of 12
Yeah, I cut down a cyprus tree and use small pieces along with the alder. I have heard mixed reviews with the cedar. I got to liking taste from those tin foil alder cedar bags from finland. I have never used cherry on salmon. I once used cherry with lobster tails and they came out nice and sweet! Did not need any butter!
post #9 of 12
Quote:
 I once used cherry with lobster tails and they came out nice and sweet

Smoked lobster tails!! 

Tell me more...

post #10 of 12

I was craving some lobster so I bought some fresh maine tails.   I threw them on the smoker with regular kingsford charcoal and some cherry wood chunks.  The cherry wood gave it a sweet taste and that is all that it needed! 

post #11 of 12

After reading up on cedar for smoking I probably will not use anymore due to all the warnings associated with it.  I like the taste and still don't understand how one can use a cedar plank for cooking and not be able to smoke same wood.  I don't want anyone to get sick so I have to advise against smoking it.  I used a cypress tree which is a cedar family member.   If anyone has any info contrary please post!  

post #12 of 12

Lots of good ideas in this thread Thumbs Up

 

I do a simple mixture of roughly half Yoshida's teriyaki and half soy with a liberal sprinkling of red pepper flakes.  The fish is sliced into strips 1-inch wide (skin on) and then into a zip-lok bag.  I just eyeball the Yoshida's and soy until the bag is fully covering the fish, add the red pepper flakes, then into the fridge for a day or two so the flavors completely permeate the meat. I usually turn the bags whenever I think of it.

 

I too use the gradual temperature increase method.

 

Best of luck playing with your method(s) - it's great fun experimenting.

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