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Seasoning a Smoker??? - Page 2

post #21 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by RogerWilco View Post
 

On our offset, I first wiped the inside, then coated it all over inside the cooking chamber with cooking oil. Having gone to a butcher and gotten several pounds of pork and beef fat trimmings, these were placed on the food racks. The smoker was then run at around 300-325°F for about four hours: smelled great and gave a real sheen to the inside.

 

I wiped everything down when I initially assembled my WSM.

 

I skipped the cooking oil and smoked several pounds of brisket fat @ 225. Rinse and repeated. It left a nice coating/sheen that helped seal up my WSM.

post #22 of 36

When My cooking chamber (Offset ) gets to greasy I just grill some steaks over charcoal and wood , Burns off the grease then just paint it again with vegetable oil . I have never had any rust spots develop like I did on my old smoker .

post #23 of 36
Thanks Paul and Prankster. I just added a baffle and tuning plates today so I'll be seasoning on Saturday to cook on Sunday. I'll be sure and clean it up.
post #24 of 36
This might sound silly, but yes, I do. If there is any soot or other foreign matter, it's nice to get it out as soon as possible before it has a chance to build up. I only clean it every 3-4 cooks and while it's hot the water turns to steam. It's really easy and with just plain water it doesn't wash off any of the season. Spraying it with vegetable oil may be overkill, but I don't see where it can do any harm. A good, thick season is always a good thing.
post #25 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Black View Post

This might sound silly, but yes, I do. If there is any soot or other foreign matter, it's nice to get it out as soon as possible before it has a chance to build up. I only clean it every 3-4 cooks and while it's hot the water turns to steam. It's really easy and with just plain water it doesn't wash off any of the season. Spraying it with vegetable oil may be overkill, but I don't see where it can do any harm. A good, thick season is always a good thing.

Ok Joe, so I am going to fire it up on Saturday to season the baffle and tuning plates. So after a couple of hot hours, I just spray the inside of chamber with water and close the lid for it to burn off, am I getting this right?

Also, just to note, I have an offset smoker so the fire will be in the firebox.

Chad
post #26 of 36
Yes, after I spray and it turns to steam, I close the doors to let it dry. When it's dry, I spray the inside of the CC with vegetable oil and bring the temp up once again and let it taper off with everything closed. I don't ever season the FB. This is the way I keep my offset clean and seasoned.
post #27 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBig1 View Post

I know that this may sound silly, but you actually clean your smoker?

Absolutely!

you want old meat or bacteria in your smoker for fresh meat?

 

The manufacturer of my smoker recommends a steam clean between every smoke. i hit my with a wire brush too to get out the foreign matter. I keep a seasoned but clean smoker every time. NO ONE gets sick from my food!

 

Happy Smoking,

phatbac (Aaron)

post #28 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatbac View Post
 

Absolutely!

you want old meat or bacteria in your smoker for fresh meat?

 

The manufacturer of my smoker recommends a steam clean between every smoke. i hit my with a wire brush too to get out the foreign matter. I keep a seasoned but clean smoker every time. NO ONE gets sick from my food!

 

Happy Smoking,

phatbac (Aaron)

 

Thanks Aaron, I'll be sure to hook that up ASAP since I bought it used and dirty.

 

Maybe since it's my first time cleaning it after not knowing the last time that it was done, I'll clean it with some Dawn and a hose and reseason it since I have to do that anyways.  I'll just get it all cleaned up.

 

Another question for anyone, do you spray paint the inside of the chamber and/or firebox with high temp paint or is that just for the outside?

 

Chad


Edited by TheBig1 - 5/19/16 at 7:03am
post #29 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBig1 View Post

I know that this may sound silly, but you actually clean your smoker?


I follow Harry Soo's advice and just run a brush over the insides after each use.

post #30 of 36
For the CC, it's season on the inside and paint on the outside
For the FB, it's paint on the outside and get the ash out after each cook. I also use a putty knife or wire brush or mostly both to keep the rust down in the FB as much as I can. About once or twice a year, it doesn't hurt to use some WD -40 on the FB.
post #31 of 36
Thanks Joe. I just cleaned it all up with a bucket of hot soapy water, my wire grill brush and the hose. It looks good. Going to let it dry overnight and season it tomorrow after wiping it down with oil.

Chad
post #32 of 36
Good luck with it, Chad. Let us see a couple of pics of that nice shiny CC after you're done.
post #33 of 36

For off set smokers Watch this Lang video.             http://www.langbbqsmokers.com/tips_caring_instructions.html

post #34 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBig1 View Post

I know that this may sound silly, but you actually clean your smoker?
I'm with you, Big. All I clean are the grates...
post #35 of 36
Cats, thank you very much for that link. That was a great tutorial.

I just don't understand why he said that you only cook with heat and not smoke. I thought smoke was the whole point. Or does the heat also carry the smoke flavor?

Chad
post #36 of 36
He is trying to note the difference between heat and smoke. The heat "Cooks" the meat. The smoke flavors the meat. There's not that much heat in a smoke house, but that meat is curing, not cooking.
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