or Connect
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Smoking Meat (and other things) › Smoking Bacon › Canadian Peameal bacon
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Canadian Peameal bacon - Page 2

post #21 of 30

6129 grams of total stuff....  at 2%...  6129 x 0.02 =  122 grams...    or close enough realizing the cure is 1% nitrite..

post #22 of 30
Thread Starter 


Thanks Dave

post #23 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveOmak View Post
 

If you want to try an injection method....  try the one I use.....

 

Weigh the meat in grams.... 

 

Weigh out 10% of the weight of the meat in water...

 

Weigh out the proper amount of, cure for the weight of the meat... 

 

Dissolve the cure in the water......   Inject ALL the water and cure into the meat...  I use 5 ml injections.....

 

Inject about every 1.5"....  refer for 6 days....   Done....

 

Ready cure...  6.8 grams per pound of meat.. for ~150 Ppm nitrite...


Hi Dave me again please don't come out shooting AR15firing.gif

 

In the injection the brine works out to 3%  salt and nitrite

 

.454 X .068 = .03

 

My question is should the brine solution be closer to 3% ?

 

Thanks John

post #24 of 30

6.8 grams / 454 grams x 100 = ~1.49% salt

 

Because the nitrite is 1% of the salt, and we want about ~150 Ppm nitrite in the meat, 454 x 0.000150 / 0.01 = 6.8 grams per pound of meat...

 

Ready cure is unique in that at 6.8 grams addition to 1# of meat, or 1# of stuff, will yield a product that is safe in nitrites and at 1.49%
salt, that's a fair/good amount of salt for the palate....

 

This is what I would use for injecting a turkey or Canadian Bacon...   I'm cutting back on salt....    For adding to fresh sausage, I would use the 6.8 grams per pound for the same reason...

 

Now for a rub on some meats, for a dry cure, like in a controlled atmosphere, a minimum of 2.5% salt, usually 3% is rubbed into the meat to aid in bacterial control as the meat dries..   Some dry rub curing you can add additional nitrite....   up to 625 Ppm nitrite because it dissipates over time.....  and those methods usually call for 2, to sometimes 3 rubbings of salt and nitrite over a several week period of time...  150-200 Ppm ingoing nitrite per rub using 3 rubs.....   not to exceed 625 Ppm in total......     like country hams..    of course it depends on which recipe you follow...   dry curing some products at a temperature of ~50ish deg. F you should use cure #2..   the nitrate reacts with bacteria in the meat to convert to nitrite over time, thus keeping the meat safe to eat.....  The first step in this type curing calls for refrigeration...  the nitrite in the cure #2 takes care of the short term bacterial control...   the nitrate then takes care of the long term bacterial control along with the salt.....

 

There is no one cure recipe that fits all scenarios of curing...   One has to be familiar with different techniques and follow those recipes specific to those parameters...

 

Seems each country has developed certain guidelines for each process...  EU, Canada, US etc...  that's why there are different amounts of nitrite in each countries cures.... 

 

I pay particular attention to regs. here in the US and sometimes I'm not sure if I'm getting confused with all the different terminologies etc...  Our government seems to like to muddy the water by over regulating, having more than one agency in charge and the agencies have no inter agency communication, so they don't know what the others are doing...   FDA, USDA, FSIS and HAACP, all control food in one way or another..    OK, there's my disclaimer as to WHY I seem to get confused....

post #25 of 30
Thread Starter 

Hi Dave I am still confused, but you have cleared up a lot with the different curing techniques.

 

Thanks again

 

John


Edited by jhend - 2/5/16 at 9:49am
post #26 of 30

You can't mix and match curing methods...   there is more to it than that.....

 

For curing a pork loin,  rub with 6.8 grams of Ready cure per pound of loin, plus any additional salt for your personal taste....  add a bit of sugar if you wish and any additional spices for flavorings....   Place in a zip bag and in the refer....   turn daily or so for 14 days.....

 

If you wish to try an injection....  6.8 grams Ready Cure per pound of loin + additional salt if you wish...  + any sugar or spices....   Water at 10% of the weight of the loin.....  Heat the water to extract the flavor of the spices... add the salt and sugar.....   Cool the water to room temp and filter to remove chunks of stuff...  add the Ready Cure and inject at 5 cc's per injection every 1 1/2" to thoroughly cover the meat chunk...   Zip bag for 7 days... 

I use this needle.....  or a syringe from the farm store works also... they are cheap.....

 

.. ..

 

 

Then dry and smoke if you wish...

post #27 of 30
Thread Starter 

Question, I know you can not refreeze without cooking if I thaw out a frozen loin and cure it can I refreeze it without cooking?

 

Thanks john
 

post #28 of 30

Yes, as long as the meat has been refrigerated and kept under 40 ish deg. F.....

post #29 of 30
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the reply Dave.

post #30 of 30

Actually, according to the USDA it is safe to refreeze raw meat & poultry thawed in the fridge. Although there may be a loss in quality.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Smoking Bacon
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Smoking Meat (and other things) › Smoking Bacon › Canadian Peameal bacon