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Temperature Probe

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I cooked a roast on my today on my MES. It was maybe 2 inches thick. I inserted probe at beginning of cook but have since read that I should wait till late before inserting probe. The thing is the instructions were to cook at 210 for 3 hours and at that time I should expect the internal temp to be 190 to 200 I was then to wrap and put in cooler for 2 hours.

I cooked 3 hours but was still at 157 on the probe. I had previously checked the internal temp with a alternate probe and found it  be accurate. I finally pulled it and it appeared and tasted done.

Any idea why the readings were still low?   What internal temp do cook roasts?

post #2 of 7

Pork roast or beef roast

post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
beef
post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 

post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by meatpacker View Post
 

I cooked a roast on my today on my MES. It was maybe 2 inches thick. I inserted probe at beginning of cook but have since read that I should wait till late before inserting probe. The thing is the instructions were to cook at 210 for 3 hours and at that time I should expect the internal temp to be 190 to 200 I was then to wrap and put in cooler for 2 hours.

I cooked 3 hours but was still at 157 on the probe. I had previously checked the internal temp with a alternate probe and found it  be accurate. I finally pulled it and it appeared and tasted done.

Any idea why the readings were still low?   What internal temp do cook roasts?


Where did you get your recipe? I've never read anywhere that a beef or pork roast of a medium-to-larger size will cook to a minimum of 190° within 3 hours at 210° cooking temp. Beef briskets are typically finished up at 195-200°F IT. I even read a recipe where it was cooked to 185° but I think that's too low. Remember that a brisket, a pork shoulder/butt, or a boneless beef chuck roast will all stall during cooking. The stall typically comes at 160° but it can happen at higher temps. The key to smoking great brisket and pork shoulder is TIME. Give the roast time to come out of its stall, which can take up to a few hours depending on the meat and how you're cooking it. For a 5 lb. roast and larger plan on a minimum of 6 hours to them. .

 

So I think the cooking directions for your recipe were wrong. Your temps were low at that 3-hour stage because they was no reason why they should have been higher based on your 210° cooking temp.

 

You can take the finished roast and place it in a cooler for 2 hours and it will stay perfectly warm. I've only used a cooler once but I kept it in no longer than an hour because, well, my family wanted to eat dinner at a decent time. When I smoke, I plan for it to be done by whatever dinner time we've decided on for that day. This means that I time the roast to finish either 30 minutes to an hour before the scheduled dinner. But I've read pros who keep their briskets in a cooler for 6 hours. To each his own.

 


195-205° IT is typically the target for pork roasts and chuckys (boneless beef chuck roasts).

post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 

I checked and I too believe the recipe is wrong. Checking other recipes it seems the cooked temp would be 135 -145 depending on rare or well done

post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by meatpacker View Post
 

I checked and I too believe the recipe is wrong. Checking other recipes it seems the cooked temp would be 135 -145 depending on rare or well done


What kind of beef roast were you cooking?

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