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Masterbuilt Pro

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Howdy, just got a MB Pro smoker for Christmas and have seen plenty of great ideas on modifying this smoker. I've ordered some gaskets for the door, a new thermometer, cast iron skillet for the wood and a bigger water pan.
I am curious if anyone has ever or would even be beneficial to beef up the actual smoker itself. My cousin is a welder and has plenty of 3/8 inch steel that he suggested/ offered to insert into the smoker. I am sure I would have to then beef up the legs and add bigger wheels as well but having a hard time passing on his offer. I dont forsee any issues with welding the steel in between the braces on the inside of the smoker. At this point I think the sides and the back would be adequate, but considering doing the bottom and top as well however I don't forsee doing the actual door itself.
Also curious if ceramic briquettes would help distribute the heat better?
Any and all suggestions and advice would be greatly appreciated
post #2 of 10
Thread Starter 
post #3 of 10
I don't know that you'd gain much. I've been using my gasser for over 10 years in temps as -10 with no issues.

Maybe have him weld up another smoker altogether.
post #4 of 10
What would be the point? I mean what would be the benefit?
post #5 of 10

I also have a Masterbuilt gasser and have never considered having the need to beef it up.  It's pretty stout just the way it is. 

post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 
Retain heat, use less fuel, more stable temp in cold weather? I figure it couldn't hurt anything, but like I mentioned not sure it would be greatly beneficial.
I've used big smokers before, but this is my first. Attached is my fathers
post #7 of 10

curious and not to hi jack the thread but i have this gasser as well and well at times it produces great results when it comes to temp control i cant keep it remotely steady. Any one else have this issue with this smoker I mean when doing briskets i cant keep it at 215 the regulator on the smoker the low flame volume is really high thus the lowest i can seem to keep the gauge is about 250 and even that is tought. I end having to use the nozzle on the propane bottle itself to kill the flame a bit but i find that tiresome as the flame may fizzle out doing this. I have also tried bending the wood pan in and sitting that on top of the flame ring so the wood doesnt heat up as fast but thiis hasnt helped any one please help im to the point of looking for a new one

post #8 of 10

Smokeyb, just adding to the steel isn't going to help your heat situation. If you are worried about it, add insulation to the outside. What's the point of adding metal to the inside???

I've heard of some people adding sand to the water tray to act as a heat sink. I've added ceramic briquettes to help retain temps, some people insulate to help in cold windy conditions.


Pmix, a lot of people have added a needle valve, or a 0-30 PSI regulator, or a hose/needle valve combo. Most people have a tough time maintaining low temps even at the lowest temps on their smokers.

post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
I figure thicker metal would help retain hear no matter if on the inside or out. Same frame of though as in much bigger thicker smokers take longer to warm up but retain heat a lot better / the weather (rain/cold/wind) have very little effect on heat loss. I understand and appreciate the suggestions of adding insulation to the outside but that's basically limiting the heat loss from the weather interacting with the thin metal the smoker is made of, right?
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Picked up some RVT High temp sealant today, what's the best way to apply this to the smoker? I though I read somewhere where someone suggested laying down a thick head of the RVT then go over that with seran wrap, close the doors and let set?

I've also done the cast iron skillet mod but I am still burning though soaked chips way to fast, any suggestion? Switch to chunks? Wrap in foil?
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