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why so many internal temps. for boston butt? - Page 2

post #21 of 26
I've got a 2 pound pork shoulder on my WSM then 2 hours later I put a 4 pound rack of St Louis style ribs on. The ribs are for tonight's supper, and I plan on having pulled pork sandwiches tomorrow for lunch.
post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Mathews View Post

Dumb question, but why does meat stall and how do I get past it if it does?

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Black View Post

I really don't know why a stall happens, I just know it does. I'm not a scientific guy or any kind of trained chef, but I do have an opinion. I think when a butt reaches about 160-165*, the heat is absorbed by the breaking down of the connective tissue and collagens. When that process is completed, the heat returns to the meat. I think that's what I've read. I don't have any way of being knowledgable other than that. If someone can give a better explanation, I'm ready to read some more.

I hope this gives you some help, Dave. Good smokin', Joe

 

The most common explanation used to be the one in Joe Black's post, however an alternative explanation is evaporative cooling, basically as moisture is lost during cooking it cools the mass of the meat causing "the stall".

The best way to avoid the stall is to cook at higher temps- 280° to 320°. I do this and I think it actually produces a better final product than cooking at lower temps. It also has the added benefit of shorter cook times which means that you can start at 9AM and be done in time for dinner. No more overnighters:yahoo:

post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef JimmyJ View Post
 

I take it out when the Therm Probe penetrates with no effort. This has been anywhere from 195 to 210°F, depending on size and other factors. I find 205 is the most common temp I reach my goal at. I also only rest 30 minutes because when probe tender , it's ready to eat and no need to rest longer in a cooler for tenderness...JJ


Exactly the right answer JJ. 

post #24 of 26

Really, folks, settle down.... this forum is about the joys of food. If you're pissed off, go to the bar, pick a fight, get your ass kicked, come home, & smoke something. 

 

195-205, every hunk of meat is different, I just wiggle the bone (no pun intended) , and when it's good & loose, it's done. Never had a complaint.  Also, can't stand waiting for the cooler rest. Just not fair-

post #25 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by cliffcarter View Post



The most common explanation used to be the one in Joe Black's post, however an alternative explanation is evaporative cooling, basically as moisture is lost during cooking it cools the mass of the meat causing "the stall".

There's an interesting article about it at amazingribs. Google "Understanding and Beating the Barbecue Stall, Bane of All Barbecuers, and How it Helps Create "Bark""

The long and short of it is moisture evaporating at a rate that stabilizes, or even lowers, the temp of the meat.
post #26 of 26
I usually also like to check for bone wiggle. Most of the time temp is 200 - 205 for pulled pork.
Basically what Mbogo said.
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