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Beef ribs and brisket on a rainy Sunday

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Delicious beef ribs and brisket on a smokey, rainy Sunday. Ran out of brown sugar for the rub and used raw sugar. I had trouble telling much difference, but it was only about 1/3 of the total sugar. Anyone know the different effects the two sugars cause in a smoke?

 

I did make one interesting change of note. Normally, I put the brisket in an aluminum tray with some Coke and covered in aluminum foil at about 150 degrees. This keeps it very moist and I like the result. However, I sacrifice my bark. I didn't want to do that to the ribs. At 185 I took them out of smoker, spilled out the Coke, and put them in a broiler oven for 10 minutes. It was just long enough to get pull the moisture out of the bark, but not the meat itself. Good trick. I then wrapped them back in foil and let them rest.

 

Great meat!

 

 

 

post #2 of 9

Great idea on your umbrella set-up.  Thumbs Up  There have been times that I wished that I could do something like that with my charcoal rig.

 

Your chow looks pretty good to me.  Just about perfect for a rainy afternoon.

 

I use Turbinado / raw sugar often for smoking.  I have read that it holds up to higher temps before burning than even brown sugar, although I have not definitively proven that to myself.  As far as flavor from the raw sugar;  I can't tell a difference.

post #3 of 9

Looks mighty tasty!

post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by One eyed Jack View Post
 

Great idea on your umbrella set-up.  Thumbs Up  There have been times that I wished that I could do something like that with my charcoal rig.

 

Your chow looks pretty good to me.  Just about perfect for a rainy afternoon.

 

I use Turbinado / raw sugar often for smoking.  I have read that it holds up to higher temps before burning than even brown sugar, although I have not definitively proven that to myself.  As far as flavor from the raw sugar;  I can't tell a difference.


Jack I have found you to be right about the sugar. Hunters set up is a MES smoker. White refined sugar burns at something over 325. At the MES temps you can use any type. Brown sugar has more Molasses than the others.

 

Hunters food looks great. 

 

Last Tuesday I was at a friends who used a similar umbrella set up. He smoked some delish tenderloins. it rained the entire smoke. I am very leery about water and electricity but his smoker never got damp let alone wet.

 

Jted

post #5 of 9

Looks really tasty, Hunter! IMO bark isn't important. Tenderness is what we shoot for (and a nice smoke ring is always a plus). I'll have to try the Coke thing sometime....

post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 

Can't get a smoke ring on electric... but I wouldn't give up the convenience for the ring. The Coke helps with the tenderness in my opinion. I figured that if it would take corrosion off a car battery, it could tenderize a tougher piece of meat.

post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by jted View Post
 


Jack I have found you to be right about the sugar. Hunters set up is a MES smoker. White refined sugar burns at something over 325. At the MES temps you can use any type. Brown sugar has more Molasses than the others.

 

Hunters food looks great. 

 

Last Tuesday I was at a friends who used a similar umbrella set up. He smoked some delish tenderloins. it rained the entire smoke. I am very leery about water and electricity but his smoker never got damp let alone wet.

 

Jted

 

Thanks for the info on the MES smoker temps.  I don't have any experience with electric smokers but am always curious and interested in learning about anything to do with my hobby's.

 

I'm with you about being leary of electricity and water.  I really need to make something to keep my charcoal rigs out of the wind and rain.  (I live on a spot that generally has at least a breeze from one of the 4 directions and I wind up walking all around the place trying to find the least windy spot to set up the grill or smoker).

post #8 of 9

Nice looking meal here. Beauty brisket!

 

Congrats on making the carrousel.

post #9 of 9
I foil pan all my big cuts of meat and let them rest in a cooler packed with towels over night. The result is good tasting tender, jucy meat with soft bark. I am going to try your trio next time I smok brisket or butts. Great idea!
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