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Can I get some input ASAP gonna buy tonight on Amazon. - Page 3

post #41 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Topfuel View Post
 

Rub put in fridge for 24 hours. pull out add more rub then put in smoker at 235.

 

 

So 235 for 15 hours then rest for 2 hours wrapped in towels ???  No foil no spritz.

 

I want the most bark I can get.

 

Need help anyone ???


Totally agree with Dr. K. with his suggestion for placing the finished pork butt/shoulder in a cooler. When you take out something like a pork butt/shoulder, a beef brisket, a trip-tip roast or a boneless chuck roast "chucky" you can foil it and then wrap it in towels or just place it in the bottom of a cooler with towels or newspapers on top of it. It will stay hot for hours as it rests and the juices are redistributed throughout the meat. Actually, the one time I smoked a tri-tip I didn't foil it.

 

235° is the temp most recommended by Ray "Dr. BBQ" Lampe for everything. I typically smoke meats between 225-240°. The bark I got from the last time I smoked a brisket was too soft so I'm going to try leaving it unfoiled for a longer period of time. I cook a 6-8 lb. brisket for about 11 hours in the temp range I mentioned. I like oak wood pellets for brisket.

 

I've got a number of commercial dry rubs--most of them given to me as gifts. I've also got several Stubb's BBQ sauces and meat marinades. I don't like Famous Dave's stuff because of the additives and other junk I see listed among the ingredients.

 

However, it is SO easy to make your own. My wife and I are avid home cooks and we've amassed just about everything you need in a panty to make anything, but it's taken us years. I have two cookbook suggestions for you that will give you great, simple-to-make dry rubs and sauces: BBQ, mop, and finishing sauces:

 

"Barbecue! Bible Sauces, Rubs, and Marinades, Bastes, Butters, and Glazes" by Steven Raichlen  http://www.amazon.com/Barbecue-Sauces-Marinades-Bastes-Butters/dp/0761119795/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8,

 

"Weber's New Real Grilling: The ultimate cookbook for every backyard griller" by Jamie Purviance. http://www.amazon.com/Webers-New-Real-Grilling-ultimate/dp/0376027983/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1446405896&sr=1-1&keywords=weber+new+real+grilling

 

"Smoke & Spice" by Cheryl and Bill Jamison. http://www.amazon.com/Smoke-Spice-Cooking-Real-Barbecue/dp/155832836X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1446406017&sr=1-1&keywords=smoke+and+spice+by+cheryl+and+bill+jamison

 

"Slow Fire: The Beginner's Guide to Barbecue" by Ray "Dr. BBQ" Lampe. http://www.amazon.com/Slow-Fire-Beginners-Guide-Barbecue/dp/1452103038/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1446406278&sr=1-3&keywords=ray+lampe

 

You can also find these books at Barnes & Noble and other places like that online or in the brick-and-mortar stores. There is nothing like producing outstanding Q with flavors from the dry rub and sauces that YOU made from scratch.

post #42 of 44
I have been looking for red oak for some time now. I found white oak, but no red oak until I ask my brother who lives in North Dakota and has a farm in northern Minnesota. He cut a red oak tree down and now I have enough to last for years, now just to season it. There is nothing better then red oak smoke on brisket.
post #43 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by daRicksta View Post
 


Totally agree with Dr. K. with his suggestion for placing the finished pork butt/shoulder in a cooler. When you take out something like a pork butt/shoulder, a beef brisket, a trip-tip roast or a boneless chuck roast "chucky" you can foil it and then wrap it in towels or just place it in the bottom of a cooler with towels or newspapers on top of it. It will stay hot for hours as it rests and the juices are redistributed throughout the meat. Actually, the one time I smoked a tri-tip I didn't foil it.

 

235° is the temp most recommended by Ray "Dr. BBQ" Lampe for everything. I typically smoke meats between 225-240°. The bark I got from the last time I smoked a brisket was too soft so I'm going to try leaving it unfoiled for a longer period of time. I cook a 6-8 lb. brisket for about 11 hours in the temp range I mentioned. I like oak wood pellets for brisket.

 

I've got a number of commercial dry rubs--most of them given to me as gifts. I've also got several Stubb's BBQ sauces and meat marinades. I don't like Famous Dave's stuff because of the additives and other junk I see listed among the ingredients.

 

However, it is SO easy to make your own. My wife and I are avid home cooks and we've amassed just about everything you need in a panty to make anything, but it's taken us years. I have two cookbook suggestions for you that will give you great, simple-to-make dry rubs and sauces: BBQ, mop, and finishing sauces:

 

"Barbecue! Bible Sauces, Rubs, and Marinades, Bastes, Butters, and Glazes" by Steven Raichlen  http://www.amazon.com/Barbecue-Sauces-Marinades-Bastes-Butters/dp/0761119795/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8,

 

"Weber's New Real Grilling: The ultimate cookbook for every backyard griller" by Jamie Purviance. http://www.amazon.com/Webers-New-Real-Grilling-ultimate/dp/0376027983/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1446405896&sr=1-1&keywords=weber+new+real+grilling

 

"Smoke & Spice" by Cheryl and Bill Jamison. http://www.amazon.com/Smoke-Spice-Cooking-Real-Barbecue/dp/155832836X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1446406017&sr=1-1&keywords=smoke+and+spice+by+cheryl+and+bill+jamison

 

"Slow Fire: The Beginner's Guide to Barbecue" by Ray "Dr. BBQ" Lampe. http://www.amazon.com/Slow-Fire-Beginners-Guide-Barbecue/dp/1452103038/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1446406278&sr=1-3&keywords=ray+lampe

 

You can also find these books at Barnes & Noble and other places like that online or in the brick-and-mortar stores. There is nothing like producing outstanding Q with flavors from the dry rub and sauces that YOU made from scratch.

After doing it one time, I have never again foiled a Tri-Tip. I have never saw any advantage to it. I simply bring it in, put it on the cutting board and 30 minutes later, slice it and they always turn out great ... tender-juicy-etc. so no need to wrap them and spoil them.

 

Only one time did I ever place a Tri-Tip in a cooler and that is when we were having a big family gathering. I smoked 4 Tri-Tips and 4 slabs of ribs at the same time. With the Tri-Tips getting done 3+ hrs ahead of the ribs and wanting to keep them warm, I wrapped them in foil and placed them in a cooler. When ribs were done and sliced, I then sliced the Tri-Tips and they were no longer tender and juicy as the one I sliced earlier for the guests to sample, but dry and not as tender. 

post #44 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brickguy221 View Post
 

After doing it one time, I have never again foiled a Tri-Tip. I have never saw any advantage to it. I simply bring it in, put it on the cutting board and 30 minutes later, slice it and they always turn out great ... tender-juicy-etc. so no need to wrap them and spoil them.

 

Only one time did I ever place a Tri-Tip in a cooler and that is when we were having a big family gathering. I smoked 4 Tri-Tips and 4 slabs of ribs at the same time. With the Tri-Tips getting done 3+ hrs ahead of the ribs and wanting to keep them warm, I wrapped them in foil and placed them in a cooler. When ribs were done and sliced, I then sliced the Tri-Tips and they were no longer tender and juicy as the one I sliced earlier for the guests to sample, but dry and not as tender. 


I've grilled tri-tip steaks quite a few times but only smoked a tri-tip roast once, as I wrote. I guess since it's a leaner cut of meat than a beef brisket or a chucky that foiling it and keeping it in a cooler would overcook the meat.

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