or Connect
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Smoking Meat (and other things) › Making Jerky › Counter-stable Jerky
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Counter-stable Jerky

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

I would like to smoke some beef jerky in my MES 40 electric smoker so that my significant other can keep with them either in the backpack or car for days they cannot grab lunch when out on the field instead of purchasing from the gas station. 

 

Is there any way to accomplish a safe product without using nitrates/nitrites?  I would just like to be able to marinate some meat and smoke.

 

A texture similar to the thin cut "Oh Boy Oberto" is what I want to achieve.  Would appreciate any help.

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by smokinginsf View Post
 

I would like to smoke some beef jerky in my MES 40 electric smoker so that my significant other can keep with them either in the backpack or car for days they cannot grab lunch when out on the field instead of purchasing from the gas station. 

 

Is there any way to accomplish a safe product without using nitrates/nitrites?  I would just like to be able to marinate some meat and smoke.

 

A texture similar to the thin cut "Oh Boy Oberto" is what I want to achieve.  Would appreciate any help.

 

Thanks!


I've smoked literally thousands of pounds of jerky and have never added nitrite. The level of dryness is the trick and it is learned and rather hard to explain but I will try. Jerky will lose a full 2/3's it's weight when dried. The drier you make it, the more stable it is at room temperature. I start out with 1/4" thick pieces whether strip jerky or ground jerky. When close to dry I am constantly checking it for doneness by pressing on individual pieces. There should be little to no softness in the pieces. When you think you have achieved this level of dryness, remove and let cool at room temperature. When all jerky is dry to your satisfaction, and at room temperature,  put all pieces in a tightly sealed plastic bag such as a Ziploc and let sit for close to 24 hours. This allows the pieces to rehydrate themselves evenly. If there are any pieces that feel soft to touch, they will actually feel raw, just simply dry them a little longer until dry. I hope this helps

post #3 of 4
What is your reason for not wanting to use cure.
post #4 of 4

I have nothing against cure. I use it in everything else including summer sausage, hot dogs, kielbasa etc. I wouldn't think of making these without the cure. Jerky, being dry, doesn't have the attributes the other products have which require the cure

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Making Jerky
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Smoking Meat (and other things) › Making Jerky › Counter-stable Jerky