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Cold Smoking help with Gas Smoker - Page 2

post #21 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmayna View Post

Wow! 

Yeah. Wow!

So far one regular guy has answered the question and two hypersensitive little old ladies have delivered lectures on manners and chastised me for writing BUY instead of USE.

Wow indeed.
post #22 of 36
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Edited by Smokin Phil - 7/24/16 at 3:45pm
post #23 of 36

Agree 100%

post #24 of 36
Ok back to BigBoy's question. I also have an MB gasser and would like to "cold smoke". I know you can use a smoke generator to make smoke without firing the gas. All of the posts I've seen call for 120 to 140 temps. Is cold smoking actually not " cold"?
post #25 of 36
So which one of the divices would work best in a masterbuilt gas smoker. The tube or the maze looking box? I am about to make purchase but not sure which one.

Thanks in advance.
post #26 of 36

SmokeyMose,

My definition of cold smoking is just that.  COLD,  no heat at all.  This applies when I smoke butter, cheese, Salmon lox, etc.  The typical temp is during winter when we see 40-60 degrees outside.

 

 

338lapua,

If you are referring to hot smoking with a gasser, I use a tube.  For cold smoking I use the maze looking box.  I have two tubes and two maze smokers.

 

Cheers

Craig

post #27 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmayna View Post

SmokeyMose,
My definition of cold smoking is just that.  COLD,  no heat at all.  This applies when I smoke butter, cheese, Salmon lox, etc.  The typical temp is during winter when we see 40-60 degrees outside.


338lapua,
If you are referring to hot smoking with a gasser, I use a tube.  For cold smoking I use the maze looking box.  I have two tubes and two maze smokers.

Cheers
Craig
Thank you, Craig. I think I'm starting to get a handle on it. It's all about terminology, I guess. I've been confusing "cold" and "hot". Although 90 to 120 sounds cold to me, it's really hot smoking. lapua and I are somewhat in the same predicament, being that you can't get a gasser to cook at that low a temp. (at least I can't!). We need to figure how to get temps like that, if possible, to use the boxes we own. I'm working on some ideas. I just got a 6" tube, which supposedly gives 2 hrs smoke, which would work for me.
I did find a site with a lot of info and explanations of terms, both about smoking and curing.
http:\\www.meatsandsausages.com
They even talk about "warm" smoking, which I think is what I want for sausage.
BTW, What's your favorite source for cures I.E. #1, #2 etc.?
post #28 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmayna View Post

SmokeyMose,
My definition of cold smoking is just that.  COLD,  no heat at all.  This applies when I smoke butter, cheese, Salmon lox, etc.  The typical temp is during winter when we see 40-60 degrees outside.


338lapua,
If you are referring to hot smoking with a gasser, I use a tube.  For cold smoking I use the maze looking box.  I have two tubes and two maze smokers.

Cheers
Craig

You answered my question perfectly. I am wanting to try cold smoking of cheese and some meats maybe even a little bourbon.

Thank you.
post #29 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokeyMose View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by cmayna View Post

SmokeyMose,
My definition of cold smoking is just that.  COLD,  no heat at all.  This applies when I smoke butter, cheese, Salmon lox, etc.  The typical temp is during winter when we see 40-60 degrees outside.


338lapua,
If you are referring to hot smoking with a gasser, I use a tube.  For cold smoking I use the maze looking box.  I have two tubes and two maze smokers.

Cheers
Craig
Thank you, Craig. I think I'm starting to get a handle on it. It's all about terminology, I guess. I've been confusing "cold" and "hot". Although 90 to 120 sounds cold to me, it's really hot smoking. lapua and I are somewhat in the same predicament, being that you can't get a gasser to cook at that low a temp. (at least I can't!). We need to figure how to get temps like that, if possible, to use the boxes we own. I'm working on some ideas. I just got a 6" tube, which supposedly gives 2 hrs smoke, which would work for me.
I did find a site with a lot of info and explanations of terms, both about smoking and curing.
http:\\www.meatsandsausages.com
They even talk about "warm" smoking, which I think is what I want for sausage.
BTW, What's your favorite source for cures I.E. #1, #2 etc.?



Rick (NEPAS) posted this recently in another thread here.


CURES - Cures are used in sausage products for color and flavor development as well as retarding the development of bacteria in
the low temperature environment of smoked meats.
Salt and sugar both cure meat by osmosis. In addition to drawing the water from the food, they dehydrate and kill the bacteria that make food spoil. In general, though, use of the word "cure" refers to processing the meat with either sodium nitrite or sodium nitrate.
The primary and most important reason to use cures is to prevent BOTULISM POISONING (Food poisoning). It is very important that any kind of meat or sausage that will be cooked and smoked at low temperature be cured. To trigger botulism poisoning, the requirements are quite simple - lack of oxygen, the presence of moisture, and temperatures in range of 40-140° F. When smoking meats, the heat and smoke eliminates the oxygen. The meats have moisture and are traditionally smoked and cooked in the low ranges of 90 to 185° F. As you can see, these are ideal conditions for food poisoning if you don't use cures. There are two types of commercially used cures.


Prague Powder (Cure) #1
Also called Insta-Cure and Modern Cure. Cures are used to prevent meats from spoiling when being cooked or smoked at low temperatures (under 200 degrees F). This cure is 1 part sodium nitrite (6.25%) and 16 parts salt (93.75%) and are combined and crystallized to assure even distribution. As the meat temperate rises during processing, the sodium nitrite changes to nitric oxide and starts to ‘gas out’ at about 130 degrees F. After the smoking /cooking process is complete only about 10-20% of the original nitrite remains. As the product is stored and later reheated for consumption, the decline of nitrite continues. 4 ounces of Prague powder #1 is required to cure 100 lbs of meat. A more typical measurement for home use is 1 level tsp per 5 lbs of meat. Mix with cold water, then mix into meat like you would mix seasonings into meat.



Prague Powder (Cure) #2
Used to dry-cure products. Prague powder #2 is a mixture of 1 part sodium nitrite, .64 parts sodium nitrate and 16 parts salt.

(1 oz. of sodium nitrite with .64 oz. of sodium nitrate to each lb. of salt.)


It is primarily used in dry-curing Use with products that do not require cooking, smoking, or refrigeration. This cure, which is sodium nitrate, acts like a time release, slowly breaking down into sodium nitrite, then into nitric oxide. This allows you to dry cure products that take much longer to cure. A cure with sodium nitrite would dissipate too quickly.
Use 1 oz. of cure for 25 lbs. of meat or 1 level teaspoon of cure for 5 lbs. of meat when mixing with meat.
When using a cure in a brine solution, follow a recipe.





DO NOT MIX EITHER CURE #1 OR CURE #2 WITH MTQ
post #30 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokeyMose View Post


Thank you, Craig. I think I'm starting to get a handle on it. It's all about terminology, I guess. I've been confusing "cold" and "hot". Although 90 to 120 sounds cold to me, it's really hot smoking. lapua and I are somewhat in the same predicament, being that you can't get a gasser to cook at that low a temp. (at least I can't!). We need to figure how to get temps like that, if possible, to use the boxes we own. I'm working on some ideas. I just got a 6" tube, which supposedly gives 2 hrs smoke, which would work for me.
I did find a site with a lot of info and explanations of terms, both about smoking and curing.
http:\\www.meatsandsausages.com
They even talk about "warm" smoking, which I think is what I want for sausage.
BTW, What's your favorite source for cures I.E. #1, #2 etc.?


I must say that I have no experience in smoking sausage, especially if it requires low hot temps.  In the hot smoke world, 90 to 120 and other low ranges might be deemed as cold smoke. Not certain. It sounds like you are doing sausages so I need to have other members who expertise in this area, chime in.  DaveOmak does a great deal in reminding us about safety issues when doing meats especially at low temps.

post #31 of 36
I place 2 1500 watt hotplates in my smokehollow 44 propane smoker when I want to smoke at lower temperatures.

One, both or none of the plates can be used to adjust temperature.

I use the amnps with no heat for cold smoking when outside Temps are above freezing, and can keep Temps above freezing in the smoker using hotplates if outside temp is freezing or below.
post #32 of 36

I'll jump in late to the battle.

 

I own a Great Outdoor Smokey Mountain (GOSM) propane smoker. I primarily use it now for cold smoking and for making jerky and sausage. When I am cold smoking I am using no heat at all and a smoke generator. I have tried all types of them and have found that the AMNTS tube smoker works the best. It will also work in the gas smoker for hot smokes as long as the pit temp is below 285°. If you plan on making jerky, and sausage and need lower temps than 200° you will need to install a needle valve to do that. With the needle valve on my GOSM I can maintain 130° all day or temps over 500°. It isn't set it and forget it though and requires some babysitting especially if it is windy outside. Hope this helps.

post #33 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtsailor2003 View Post

I'll jump in late to the battle.

I own a Great Outdoor Smokey Mountain (GOSM) propane smoker. I primarily use it now for cold smoking and for making jerky and sausage. When I am cold smoking I am using no heat at all and a smoke generator. I have tried all types of them and have found that the AMNTS tube smoker works the best. It will also work in the gas smoker for hot smokes as long as the pit temp is below 285°. If you plan on making jerky, and sausage and need lower temps than 200° you will need to install a needle valve to do that. With the needle valve on my GOSM I can maintain 130° all day or temps over 500°. It isn't set it and forget it though and requires some babysitting especially if it is windy outside. Hope this helps.
Where would one find one of these needle valves, sailor? I've heard a lot about them and have been leary since I've had blowouts on the low settings even without one, but maybe I'll give it a try..
post #34 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokeyMose View Post

Where would one find one of these needle valves, sailor? I've heard a lot about them and have been leary since I've had blowouts on the low settings even without one, but maybe I'll give it a try..

You can make one from scratch or you can get a pre made one. This is what you are looking for and it can be found on Amazon too:

http://www.wayfair.com/Bayou-Classic-High-Pressure-Regulator-Control-Valve-7000-L3746-K~BAY1108.html?refid=GX71596707750-BAY1108&device=m&ptid=141436846156&gclid=CMXwn9_6wMkCFcZbfgodGj0PQQ
post #35 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmayna View Post

Wow! 

Absolutely agree with the "Wow". So people misunderstood - get over it. Don't be an ass.

As far as using the smoker box you have try it and see if it works. The biggest issue is whether it will continue to stay lit. Keeping the pellets tight together to keep the fuel source ignite yet loose enough for the proper air flow is key. May take a few tries to figure out.

BTW. Might have helped to post a pic of your smoker box along with the question. That would have helped clarify what you were asking and given us a better idea o what you are working with so we can better assist. Otherwise we are just guessing what your set up is like.
post #36 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by smokersouth View Post

I already have a smoker box and if I can use it for cold smoking, why would I buy one of these Amazen products?

I was thinking I could place the pellets in the smoker box, place a ball of aliminum foil at one end of the box to kind of keep the pellets compacted and light one end of the pellets with a torch and never turn on the propane at all.

Will they not do a slow, continuous burn horizontally for some reason?

Is there a reason this won't work?

Smoker South, this might work, since the amazen products are so good and fool proof, there is probably no-one who has put the effort into experimenting with it to try and make it work. I'll pay the 30$ to avoid the multiple failed attempts that testing and practicing would yield and go with a proven product that when combined with a little hand sanitizer, will light reliably with a standard lighter and burn all night without me having to wake up to see if it has gone out halfway through the night.
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