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Your thoughts on a meat slicer

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I been looking for a "good" home use meat slicer for a while, hoping to spend $300 to $400, May a little more for a used one. I been searching for a used Globe, Hobart, Berkeley, etc. my thoughts are I should get at least a 10" blade and stay away from plastic gears. Want to stay away from the cheap ones found in Wal mart, Rival type of slicer.

Any thoughts on amount of power I should look at and what your thoughts on a what brand to choose. Do you think10" blade is large enough to do "anything" I want in house? Anything I should know or look for in a slicer?

I saw the links on the other meat slicer thread for the high end slicer from Walmart, but it must be a very new line of slicer. I looked at three or four sites for review and could not find one review on that brand.

Thanks for any help provided.

Alan
post #2 of 9


I am also looking for a new meat slicer. I cure and smoke my own bacon, about 20 pounds at a time. During the last five pounds, my slicer just stops. I think the motor gets to hot. Other large amounts of meat cause the same problem.

I'll keep watch for other replies. 

Thanks for this posting.  

post #3 of 9

These are what I've been looking at lately saying hmmm

 

http://shop.vacuumsealersunlimited.com/Economy-Meat-Slicers_c90.htm

post #4 of 9

I got tired of trying to find a good used slicer and got this one last year.  http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-MTN-10-240W-Commercial-Restaurant-Electric-Frozen-Meat-Deli-Food-Slicer-/320756739524?hash=item4aae976dc4  I have been very happy with it and it hasn't given me a single problem.

post #5 of 9

Alan, I'm kind of shooting into the dark here as you don't mention what you expect to cut, how much at one time or how often

 

I don't know where you are but here in central New York craigslist has a boatload of good slicers to choose from  Yes, you may need to sort a few frogs out to find a prince but you can find a good solid commercial slicer at a very reasonable price.

 

I don't know if there is a rule of thumb on blade size as opposed to the height of the product you'll be slicing but my experience is that slicers do their best work on product about 1/2- 2/3 of the blade diameter or smaller.  For used machines you won't be paying much of a premium, if any, for a 12" unit.

 

One concern that is very real is to consider how much storage space you have, how much space you have to use it and how much weight you are willing/able to tote around if the slicer needs to be moved to use it.  You also want to be sure parts are availlable so check around the internet before buying used.  Medium and heavy duty commercial food service equipment can last decades so age is less important than condition and parts availability.  If you aren't mechanically inclined then a nearby service dealer might be a big plus.

 

Power and design relate more to how easily the slicer can cope with slicing a lot of hard product like hard cheese or dried beef than in slicing other items.  I can tell you from experience that cutting several sticks of air dried pepperoni at the same time can put a strain on even a $7,000 slicer.  If none of those are going to be sliced in large quantity then power is likely not as important as the maker, condition and parts availabillty. 

 

Slicers designed for home use aren't meant to be slicing for a long time or with any great frequency.  Commercial slicers are generally rated as light, medium or heavy duty with the ability to slice hard cheese and the hours a day of use seeming to be the determining factors.  We have Univex 8512 and a Hobart 2912 12" slicers.  Both are considered medium/heavy duty machnes and are just a few years out of production.  They sold for $5,200 and $6,800 at retail when discontinued.  They are rated for 8 hours or more a day of use but not for large amounts of hard cheese-go figure.  They are both 1/2 HP machines that weigh over 100 pounds.  Believe me, we don't have a lot in either even after replacing all the worn parts and blades.  The smoothness and quiet operation of either is a whole different experience than using an inexpensive home use machine like our original 10" job.  The ability to cut from near paper thin to over an inch thick doesn't hurt either.

 

For comparison, our grinder is considered light duty commercial and is rated for 2 hours a day.  Commercial equipment if tough stuff.  A month's worth of 2 hours continuous operation a day is more than most of us will use in a ifetime.  That same toughness means that used commercial equipment is pretty nearly bulletproof if bought in good servicable or repairable condition.

 

So, when all is said and done what you expect to cut, how much at once and how often ought to count for as much as price, condition and parts availability (and maybe service availability).  A new machine of any price that doesn't have a parts and service network and a maker and distribution network that will ensure parts avaiablability for a few decades (at a minumum) will be no bargian

 

I suspect that you would do well to shop around for a good condition used machine in any of the commercial brand names for which you can get parts.

 

Good luck and let us know how things work out.  BTW, please update your profile with a location so we know where you hail from.

 

Best regards,

 

Lance

post #6 of 9

I just bought a globe chefmate gc10 and its an older one unlike the new that are 2.5 amps and 1/4 hp these are 5amps and 1/3 hp...I pd 248 for it..and now new price is about high 600's...just make sure to ask if blade is chiped or bad and the same with the sharpening stones, doesn't matter which brand..Hobart is of course good but usually more bucks than comparable globe.. haven't researched others but im sure there good also...and with any kther are somany models like g10 or gc10 or 500 series or gc500 series...ect... look at amps for motor power. I should have mine on Thursday..and storage space must be considered..either the whole dang counter for the 2500+ ones or like a big toaster for everyday normal use..rally don't need one continuous duty...heck rated at 30 minutes a day gets you a grand slicer...jeff

post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the help on the slicer, very good input. I decided to dail down a bit but try to stay with a machine that would, hopefully, do all I needed. As mention, weight and storage was a factor I hadn't thought about and very much appreciated the advice. I pulled the trigger on this unit, I think it is big and powerful enough to do what I need yet it's not a monster to move. I also read ever review and it only had four one or two star negative reviews out of 98, seems four folks didn't realize it had to be cleaned which means the blade has to be removed. Thanks again, should be here in a week or so and I'm looking forward to slicing some meat .... I hope that doesn't include my fingers. Lol. Here's the unit, thanks again;

http://www.amazon.com/Best-Choice-Products®-Commercial-Food/dp/B002SMC1ZU/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1440965028&sr=8-2&keywords=Avantco+slicer#customerReviews
post #8 of 9

FWIW, I bought an SL312 12" Avantco slicer and am happy with it. It's not the quality of a high end brand like a Berkel or Hobart, but does everything I need it to do. Like any commercial slicer, the biggest issue is the weight. Mine is 60+ lbs. I keep it on a heavy duty cart and roll it out of the way when not in use.

post #9 of 9
This may be a little late.. but I'll mention it anyways... I have a cheap Cabela's slicer ... It doesn't have the cover over the blade... so the whole blade is exposed.. The problem I find with that is... when you slide the meat/cheese through and slice... the cutting side of the blade is rotating down.. but when you get all the way through the piece of meat/cheese and the piece/block gets to the other side of the blade (rotation going up).. The blade will lift the piece/block up off the slide table and then you have to stop and re position (A BIG PITA)... The harder you push the piece/block in towards the backstop to stop from doing that.. the worse it is... So with all that said.. I hope it is understood what I am trying to say... Just make sure you get a slicer with a cover over the blade...
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