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Scientists Learn How Listeria Grows on Refrigerated Smoked Salmon

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
One of the dangers of Listeria monocytogenes is that it can grow on food even in the cold temperatures of the refrigerator, although it does grow more slowly at 40 degrees F or less.


http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2015/08/scientists-learn-how-listeria-grows-on-refrigerated-smoked-salmon/#.VcTBNhHbKUk
post #2 of 9

So I guess cold smoked salmon needs to be cooked through to be safe. Good to know. 

post #3 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveOmak View Post

One of the dangers of Listeria monocytogenes is that it can grow on food even in the cold temperatures of the refrigerator, although it does grow more slowly at 40 degrees F or less.


http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2015/08/scientists-learn-how-listeria-grows-on-refrigerated-smoked-salmon/#.VcTBNhHbKUk


Dave,
Reviewed several articles on this matter with salmon and other meats. Alot of what they are talking about in my opinion is hatchery and mass produced butchers of beef. It seems that the usda standard for cleanliness is so low that they are now allowing a percentage of bacteria to meat ratio higher than ever.

Also a gentlemen that lives close to me is a dry food inspector for the fda and he told me that even in boxed cereal they allow so many parts fieces, insects,and dirt in each batch to be packaged. He told me that there standards would surprise anyone.

Another thing he told me is that if you choose to do cold smoking make sure your the one to clean it dont get already processed.
post #4 of 9

Does cure#1 remove the danger of listeria? The reason I ask, is that I'm making beef jerky (just posted that thread) and I'm using cure#1. I believe I'm using the right amount: 1 tsp for five pounds of beef, The issue is that my daughter-in-law is pregnant and she's been told not eat cold cuts, hot dogs, etc. I thought the issue was nitrates but she told me "No, the big danger is listeria". She said that if she were to contract listeria, granted a very rare chance, it would kill the fetus.

 

I know she loves jerky but I wouldn't even think about giving my son any, if there was a chance she'd be tempted to try it. She loves jerky and these days anything that's really spicy.  

 

Anybody know if having used cure#1 in the marinade will obviate the danger? Without indisputable evidence, I don't think I'll be sharing it with her. 

post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/wcm/connect/29d51258-0651-469b-99b8-e986baee8a54/Controlling-LM-Delicatessens.pdf?MOD=AJPERES

 

It appears listeria is transferred between products by unclean equipment etc. in a deli or food processing plant among other pathways...  

 

From what reading I have done, eliminate purchasing pre packaged ready to eat foods....   or foods from deli's...  unless you can heat it to 165 deg. F.....   listeria is found everywhere...

 

I don't purchase salads from delis..  sandwiches, wings, etc....  I purchase the fixings from the grocery stock merchandise and make the stuff at home...    Fruits are washed and rinsed, usually in a weak Clorox solution...  Lettuce, cabbage etc., the outer layer is thrown out....   Too many folks handle that kind of stuff...

 

Stuff that is made in a commercial food processing facility is "safer" that stuff packaged in a deli, IMO...

 

Chef JJ may have some very good advice on this subject...   

post #6 of 9

Here is some additional detail on controlling Listeria...http://www.foodsafetymagazine.com/magazine-archive1/junejuly-2011/inhibiting-listeria-growth-to-improve-food-safety/

 

At risk people: Very old, very young, compromised immune system, pregnant women, etc, need to take greater precautions. Some additional info... http://www.foodsafety.gov/poisoning/causes/bacteriaviruses/listeria/

 

Cure #1 can have an impact on Listeria but offers no guaratee by itself. Proper handling and storage of foods that may contain Listeria is also needed. Sodium Nitrite can damage Listeria but not necessarily kill it. With cold smoked Salmon, Cure #1 buys some storage time but long term refer storage is dangerous. Eat Smoked Salmon proptly. The same goes for Kippered Beef and soft Refrigerated Jerky. Regarding Jerky, the only safe jerky is that which has been processed will all precautions taken. It must be handled safely, use cure#1, heat to an IT of 160°F and must be thoroughly dried until leathery and tough. No tender refer jerky is safe for the At Risk group. Short of Jerky being the only food available, I would not give it to at risk folks...JJ

post #7 of 9

Are they referring to raw Salmon that is cold smoked? What if the Salmon, such as smoked lox or gravlax which came from a brined process is vacuumed sealed &  frozen shortly after being smoked?


Edited by cmayna - 3/6/16 at 7:53am
post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmayna View Post
 

What if the Salmon, such as smoked lox or gravlox is vacuumed sealed &  frozen shortly after being smoked?

 

 

Craig, morning.....    It could have already picked up the listeria from somewhere...   Salmon does not have listeria...   It comes from other foods and cross contamination...   

 

 

One of the dangers of Listeria monocytogenes is that it can grow on food even in the cold temperatures of the refrigerator, although it does grow more slowly at 40 degrees F or less.

post #9 of 9

Thank you for the responses and links to some great information. A bit scary but I guess it's better to be safer, rather than sorry. I won't be sharing my jerky with my son and daughter-in-law. I'll also pass the links along to them. Thanks again....

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