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Taking out meat from fridge

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Approximately how long would it take for meat coming out of refrigerator to reach room temperature?

 

Thanks

post #2 of 10

Many variables factor into that weight, thickness, temp of meat, temp of room etc but it's almost always better to go from fridge to smoker. Generally safer from a food safety standpoint and you get a better smoke ring too

post #3 of 10

Going along with Pinywoods it makes a difference if we are talking a burger patty or a pork butt.  Generally speaking, it's best to thaw in fridge, if thawing isn't feasible start applying heat to whatever it is within one hour.  

post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 

In this case, I'm referring to thawed pork tenderloins.

post #5 of 10

If pressed for time, you could place them in a zip bag and steam, put in simmering water or of course you could nuke them. 

post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 

So whenever possible, it's best to go straight from fridge to smoker (when fully thawed)?

post #7 of 10

Yes, or within one hour.

post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevetheteacher View Post
 

So whenever possible, it's best to go straight from fridge to smoker (when fully thawed)?

 

Short answer yes 40-140 (rounded to even numbers) is the range of temperature where most food safety "nasty's" thrive so the less time spent there the better

post #9 of 10

As said above, the safest method is thawed meat from refer to hot smoker. The only common exception is a big hunk of Beef that you want an even Med/Rare to Medium. This meat must be intact, no garlic punched in or injection. Letting it warm an hour but no more than 2, per USDA recommendations, then in to the Smoker or Oven, gives a more even, edge to edge doneness. For meats served well done or to the point that they are easily pulled, gain NO benefit from warming and if injected or does not have an intact surface, allowing to warm can cause food borne illness!

 

I your case with Pork Tenders, the small 1-1.5Lb pieces, cook fast. You want Max time in the Smoker and still cook them the short hop to an Internal Temp (IT) of 145°F (slightly pink), 2 hours +/-. By keeping them at refer temp 36°F, until the last minute, gives the max contact with smoke and still gets them perfectly cooked. Warming, actually Precooking, by any means other than sitting at room temp before going into the smoker, will inhibit smoke penetration and reduce the overall smoke flavor of the meat...JJ

post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef JimmyJ View Post
 

As said above, the safest method is thawed meat from refer to hot smoker. The only common exception is a big hunk of Beef that you want an even Med/Rare to Medium. This meat must be intact, no garlic punched in or injection. Letting it warm an hour but no more than 2, per USDA recommendations, then in to the Smoker or Oven, gives a more even, edge to edge doneness. For meats served well done or to the point that they are easily pulled, gain NO benefit from warming and if injected or does not have an intact surface, allowing to warm can cause food borne illness!

 

I your case with Pork Tenders, the small 1-1.5Lb pieces, cook fast. You want Max time in the Smoker and still cook them the short hop to an Internal Temp (IT) of 145°F (slightly pink), 2 hours +/-. By keeping them at refer temp 36°F, until the last minute, gives the max contact with smoke and still gets them perfectly cooked. Warming, actually Precooking, by any means other than sitting at room temp before going into the smoker, will inhibit smoke penetration and reduce the overall smoke flavor of the meat...JJ

This is a great answer. The only thing I would add is that you should never put something in your smoker that is still partially frozen. You would end up with the thawed part being overdone and the frozen part potentially not being cooked through.

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