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Alaskan Cod

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
I was planning on smoking Alaskan cod fillets and I have searched on tips and I think from what I understand it's recommended to cold smoke but I was planning to hot smoke them. Am I able to do this or is cold smoking the way to go?
post #2 of 6
Cod has almost no intramuscular fat.... For my first try, I would add 1/2 to 1 hour cold smoke then cook my usual way.... Just as a test....

I like flour/starch mix with seasonings and fried.... Seems to me, cooking fairly hot and fast works best for us.... keeps the fish moist...
post #3 of 6

Cold Smoking Fish can be risky unless you highly trust the source, you caught it or you use Cure #1. There is no reason not to Hot Smoke, 225°F, until the IT hits 140-145°F. You want the fish moist and just done in the center. If it is falling apart, it is over cooked. If you want additional flavor, you may enjoy the Brine Recipe below. If your cod is a similar thickness to Bear's salmon, you can even follow his procedure. Either way the Pellicle formation is most important for good smoke flavor...JJ

 

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/91264/final-smoked-salmon-with-recipe-instructions-and-qview

post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef JimmyJ View Post

Cold Smoking Fish can be risky unless you highly trust the source, you caught it or you use Cure #1. There is no reason not to Hot Smoke, 225°F, until the IT hits 140-145°F. You want the fish moist and just done in the center. If it is falling apart, it is over cooked. If you want additional flavor, you may enjoy the Brine Recipe below. If your cod is a similar thickness to Bear's salmon, you can even follow his procedure. Either way the Pellicle formation is most important for good smoke flavor...JJ

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/91264/final-smoked-salmon-with-recipe-instructions-and-qview



The method you recommended suggests, cold smoking for up to 3 hours, and it doesn't use any cure.....

I'm wondering what the difference could be when only cold smoking for 1/2 - 1 hours, as far as the safety aspect is concerned....

Does your recommendation also include reverse searing of meats... which is a common practice.....

Maybe it's just my posts, that get the "JJ" scrutiny...
post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 
Right on guys thanks for the help. Since I'm cooking tonight I think I'm just gonna have to grill it but will definetly try the cold smoke idea next time
post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveOmak View Post


The method you recommended suggests, cold smoking for up to 3 hours, and it doesn't use any cure.....

I'm wondering what the difference could be when only cold smoking for 1/2 - 1 hours, as far as the safety aspect is concerned....

Does your recommendation also include reverse searing of meats... which is a common practice.....

Maybe it's just my posts, that get the "JJ" scrutiny...
 

 

 As far as Bearcarver's method...The surface of the " Intact " filets are getting well above 140°F in 4 hours, where is the problem?

 

Statement..."Cold Smoking Fish can be risky unless you highly trust the source, you caught it or you use Cure #1. " What part of that is in any way disparaging toward your statement???? I have regularly advocated a short 1 hour burst of smoke since the meat will only be in the Danger Zone a short time, HALF the amount of time, 2 hours, allowed by USDA regulations. Reverse Sear is a completely different process and considering the first stage happens at temps above 140°F, I am clueless as to what point you are trying to make...th_dunno-1[1].gif. The OP had a question about whether he could Hot Smoke or if he should Cold Smoke. Since there was no mention of any 2 stage smoking, I chose to surmise he was refering to an extended cold smoke to reach the desired color, flavor, etc...JJ


Edited by Chef JimmyJ - 7/27/15 at 10:40pm
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