or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Knife recommendations - Page 2

post #21 of 34

I have a set of 30yr old JA Henckels International knives that still cut great. I have some JA Henckels Professional S knives that cut great. I have some cheap Tramontina knives that cut great. I have many knives that cut great. Good knives that fit your hand well, is what counts, brand not so much. My favourite paring knife is an Eberhard Schaff 4.5" Goldhamster I've had for 10yrs. My favourite Chef's knife... I have a few I like depending on what I'm doing. Just slight differences based on the task at hand.

 

I'm just a knife whore... what can I say!

post #22 of 34

Just a heads up on Wusthof and Henckels... There is a HUGE difference within the model offerings for each knife brand. Each brand has forged blade offerings (which they built their reputation on), and they now sell stamped blade knives which are of lesser quality/durability/price.

 

For Wusthof,the stamped knives are from the "Pro" and "Gourmet" model lines (and the ones I recommend that people avoid). Everything else (Classic,Grand Prix II, Ikon, Classic Ikon) is forged.

 

Henckel has a ton of stamped blade knives out there flooding the market. The easiest way to tell a Henckel forged knife from a stamped knife is to look at the logo. If the Henckel logo has 2 men, it should be a forged blade. If the logo only has 1 man, it should be stamped and you should avoid it like the plague. 

 

Don't buy knives without first handling them in person. All the brands and models have different weights, handle angles, shape, balance, etc. What works for someone else, might not work out for you because your hand is different. 

post #23 of 34
Thread Starter 
All of mine have two guys and are made in Germany
post #24 of 34

Sorry to bring back an old thread but I decided to look at some new knives, also.  I have had some Wusthof, Henckel's, Victorinox and several others.  I have a Cuisinart Chef's knife that I can put a wicked edge on and it holds it pretty well.  But, I heard a lot about Shun and Japanese steel so I did some research.  I ended up buying a three piece set of Tojiro, a 210mm Gyuto (chef's) and two Pettys (paring), 90mm and 150mm.  I also bought a 270mm Sujihiki (slicer). 

 

Now I've only had them a week but have put them through their paces, raw meats, smoked bacon slabs, veggies, etc. These knives came sharp, not just sharp, but holy crap sharp.  They appear to be holding up quite well for what I have done so far.  Jsut figured if anyone was looking for entry level Japanese steel this endorsement might help.

 

post #25 of 34
Whatever you choose, I would avoid shun. Bought a set about a year ago. These knives require lots of maintenance. Super light and razor sharp, but also very fragile. The tip of my slicing knife bent during normal usage. Never dropped it! Funny thing... I always grab my cheap carving knife when slicing ribs or brisket! 😊
post #26 of 34

I've got a bunch of Japanese knives, 

 

http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/InformationAboutSteels.html

 

Outstanding if you don't mind sharpening them. I have a large sushi one I use for most things, and it slices through veg with it's own weight no pressure.

post #27 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by conkey210 View Post

What really gets to me is nobody can explain why this is and has happened. The knife edge is completely ruined.

 

Do you have any pictures?  I'm no doctor but I'd like to see.  Electrolysis is the fastest (non obvious) way to eat holes in steel that I know of.  Maybe there's something strange going on in your dish washer?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by hollowpoint1911 View Post
 

Just a heads up on Wusthof and Henckels... There is a HUGE difference within the model offerings for each knife brand. Each brand has forged blade offerings (which they built their reputation on), and they now sell stamped blade knives which are of lesser quality/durability/price.

 

For Wusthof,the stamped knives are from the "Pro" and "Gourmet" model lines (and the ones I recommend that people avoid). Everything else (Classic,Grand Prix II, Ikon, Classic Ikon) is forged.

 

Henckel has a ton of stamped blade knives out there flooding the market. The easiest way to tell a Henckel forged knife from a stamped knife is to look at the logo. If the Henckel logo has 2 men, it should be a forged blade. If the logo only has 1 man, it should be stamped and you should avoid it like the plague. 

 

Don't buy knives without first handling them in person. All the brands and models have different weights, handle angles, shape, balance, etc. What works for someone else, might not work out for you because your hand is different. 

 

This guy knows what he's talking about.  I had a set of those cheap Henckel's.  They're sold as "eversharp" or "no sharpening needed", but what they really mean is that they're not capable of being sharpened.  I second the recommendation to hold the knife before you buy.  If the blade is so shiny it looks like's it's chromed and there's nearly no weight to it, assume it's garbage.

My wife bought me a single large "caphalon" blade for Christmas or my birthday several years ago and it's pretty awesome.  Since then I bought a bunch of caphalon blades to replace all the junk henckels blades (I salvaged the block) and I've been more than happy with them. For under $100 I replaced pot metal with real steel. I bought one of each set they sold at JCP at that time, so I have a set of steak knifes, 2 pairing knives and... a big bread cutting serrated edge one (with long teeth so it can still be sharpened) and a few bigger knives.   I know they're not japanese folded steel blades or german steel... nor are they woots steel... but they're good thick steel, they hold their edge and when I dull them, I can sharpen them up fast.

If money is really tight and you want a decent set super cheap, there's sets on amazon that will surprise you.  I bought one set, red handles and a magnetic block that has super thin blades, but they've withstood quite a bit of abuse and still look and work great.  I was surprised how much I like the thinner blades.  I've also seen some super cheap (inexpensive) blades at Costco.  The steel look awesome, but they have cheap looking plastic handles.  I bought the big butcher blade with the intention of trying to make my own handle... but it's been sitting in a drawer for a few months now.

That henckles set I bought really turned me away from anything "serrated".  I don't even buy pocket knives with a serrated edge now because it's such a PITA to sharpen them.

 

Here's an example of the junk henckles set:

http://www.amazon.com/Henckels-International-Everedge-13-Piece-Cheese/dp/B00005K8PA

from their Q and A: "Much like the other responses, I have to agree with them. They are a lightweight set and did not stay very sharp like I had expected them to."

 

and here's the uber cheap thin but decent blades I was talking about:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00XFHMM4C

 

FYI, I think that set was on sale for $29 when I bought it.

post #28 of 34
I just started getting some ok knives. I decided on dexter russell because of decent reviews and supposedly made right here in Massachusetts. They are decent but I am disappointed that the 5 inch boning knife is stamped "Japan "
post #29 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1967RobG View Post

I just started getting some ok knives. I decided on dexter russell because of decent reviews and supposedly made right here in Massachusetts. They are decent but I am disappointed that the 5 inch boning knife is stamped "Japan "

 

Be careful with the carbon steel Dexter knives.  They will start rusting before you even take it out the packaging.  Pretty crappy.  Get the sanisafe series.

post #30 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by mummel View Post

Be careful with the carbon steel Dexter knives.  They will start rusting before you even take it out the packaging.  Pretty crappy.  Get the sanisafe series.
I did get the sanisafe ones. Funny thing is I was going through some stuff in the kitchen to make room for the new stuff and came across my parents Chicago cutlery partial set. Not the greatest but good sturdy knives. I've started sharpening them and making card board sheaths. If nothing else they hold sentimental value
post #31 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1967RobG View Post


I did get the sanisafe ones. Funny thing is I was going through some stuff in the kitchen to make room for the new stuff and came across my parents Chicago cutlery partial set. Not the greatest but good sturdy knives. I've started sharpening them and making card board sheaths. If nothing else they hold sentimental value

Rob You can put a razor edge on them in 3 minutes,I have always used a stone til old age,got to my hands.

Richie

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/236095/work-sharp-elec-knife-sharpener

post #32 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by tropics View Post

Rob You can put a razor edge on them in 3 minutes,I have always used a stone til old age,got to my hands.
Richie
http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/236095/work-sharp-elec-knife-sharpener
That is quite the set of sharpening tools.Thanks for sharing. I've had a thing for knives since I was a kid.
All this sausage making gear and cooking stuff in general...I'm gonna need a bigger kitchen
post #33 of 34

I'm not familiar with the etiquette here yet, regarding posting to old threads vs. starting new ones, but here's my two cents:

 

I've used Wusthoff knives, I own some Henckels knives, and have used Victorinox and a variety of other name brand knives. But for anyone on a budget or who gags when seeing the prices of nice knives, you should really check out Winco's forged knives. They make some cheap low-end junk that is used in a million restaurants, both in the kitchens and in the dining rooms, but the also sell some surprisingly good chef's knives. I bought a single 6" chef knife via eBay for something ridiculous like $12 just to check it out, and it is phenomenal. Very solid, good handle, takes an edge as well as knives costing ten times as much, and is a joy to use. Amazon sells they for cheap, too.

 

As I replace other knives I'll be buying more from Winco. They may not look quite as stellar as expensive knives, but they still look good, I honestly think you get 90% of the performance. If I had cash to spare I'd probably go with Wusthoff, but I'm completely happy with Winco. Just thought I'd share, since this is a brand most of us wouldn't normally consider but delivers enough quality to satisfy working chefs, and is more than good enough for any home cook.

post #34 of 34

I recommend the Tojiro DP line. I have had them for about a year. Definetly superior steel and edge retention to the German lines. Easy to sharpen and a nice wide "reasonably" priced for quality knives. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home