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How come every smoking book has different cooking times for ribs?? - Page 2

post #21 of 38

For me...... if you are cutting the ribs and they are falling apart, they are over cooked. I do not serve them at home or work like that. Ribs should be eaten off the bone, not with a fork.......

When I cut I have the bone side down. I find the rub or sauce (your choice) tends to come off if done the other way. It is easier to see the bone with it up, so it really depends on you..... When we have a lot of racks to cut we will stand the ribs up and use a heavy knife and just go for it.......at that point it is not about a competition look for the cut, it is about keeping them hot and served quickly.

 

 

BINGO !!!!

post #22 of 38

Cal,

I'm reading a lot of different cook times and temps. Every combo has a different result, I'm sure. If you don't mind me asking, what temps & length of time/method do you use to reach that "tug" without being "fall off the bone" overcooked you speak of?

I'm a newbie and am just trying to learn the best I can and this "tug" is pretty much what I'm looking for in my bb's.

Thanks.

post #23 of 38

I cook all my ribs the same way , I  use no " method "  just common sense 

(1) I never cover anything I cook

(2) I use a dry rub on all my ribs and rub it in well  

(3) I don' t preheat anything

(4) I put the ribs in the smoker

(5) I put a fair amount of hickory chips in before lighting

(6) once it starts smoking pretty heavy I reduce the heat to LOW 

(7) I keep the temp at or below 225  for 3 1/2 hours  then and only then I open and look at the ribs

(8) if needed I will add a few more chips and get one final smoke going for the last hour ( only if needed )

 

 call this a method if that makes you happy,  to me its just basic cooking  and after doing it 1000s of time's I know its all that's needed

 I let ALL my ribs rest at LEAST 1 hour ( 2 hours is better ) but while they are resting I hold the temp at 140 degrees ( I use a counter top steam  table for this ) but you can also do it in your oven

this give's the juices time to redistribute leaving the meat nice and tender without being over cooked

 most ribs will be ready in 3 1/2 hours but I have gotten an occasional tough slab of ribs that took the extra hour

 

your ribs should look like this  

post #24 of 38

by the way I serve sauce on the side , I NEVER put sauce on my ribs , some people will put bbq sauce on them,  ... other's  like em just the way they are .

but I let them decide ...after all they are the ones eating the ribs !!!

 

 

hope this helps

post #25 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by cal1956 View Post

by the way , that "smoke ring " is not really a smoke ring ,its just called that
Good to know!! What is it and what causes it?
post #26 of 38

its caused when nitrogen dioxide  reacts to form nitrous acid  . this is what gives the so called smoke ring

post #27 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by cal1956 View Post

its caused when nitrogen dioxide  reacts to form nitrous acid  . this is what gives the so called smoke ring
And where does the nitrogen dioxide come from?
post #28 of 38

here is a link that explains it far better than I can:    http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/a/smoke-ring-formation

 

I had read an article about 30 years ago that explained it , but the link above goes into a LOT more detail

post #29 of 38
Not sure why anyone would cook ribs and want them chewey. In the south we always made them tender and falling off the bone. Competition bbq is not good they only meet requirements for a contest and usually tough short time cooking. If it ain't tender to eat why waste time cooking it or smoking it. The person eating it deserves better. Southern style matters. Let the BBQ box do the magic, be patient or don't do it at all.
post #30 of 38
ONLY THE PERSON eating can decide if it's overcooked to them. Can't decide that for everyone else.
post #31 of 38

I beg to differ ,

 

  when you can suck the meat thru a damn straw its overcooked , if you can't pick up the meat without it falling apart its overcooked , when it black as coal its overcooked ,when it tastes like charcoal  its overcooked

 

 1000s of slabs of ribs ,I have had exactly 1 ...count it again, I said 1 complaint that my ribs were undercooked . and the truth is I might have rushed that slab  

 

 

 when you have finished cooking your 1000th slab , then talk to me about what's  overcooked /undercooked

 

and just for the record : I have only lived in Colorado for the past 15 years , before that I lived, worked and cooked in the deep south

 

you don't need to be a dang scientist to know how  to cook ribs, or read a damn book to tell you when they are done


Edited by cal1956 - 7/24/15 at 7:04pm
post #32 of 38
That is the most ridiculous thing I have heard. YOUR OPINION yes YOUR OPINION, does not set the standard for everyone. That's why it's an OPINION and NOT A FACT. That's all that needs to be said.
Edit: I'm sure everyone is getting tired of your negative know it all comments.
post #33 of 38

not my opinion  , the opinion of all the folks that ate my ribs , and THAT  is the only ones that count , 


Edited by cal1956 - 7/24/15 at 7:06pm
post #34 of 38
Sure does.
post #35 of 38
Thanks for the advice.beercheer.gif
post #36 of 38

your more than welcome

 

despite what you might read , its not rocket science , just cooking in one of its most basic forms ,

 

the real secrets in bbq is in the sauces and sometime the preparation  of the meat before its cooked , some people ( myself included ) have spent years perfecting their sauce and the way they prep the meat

and those are the things we don' t tell , but as far as to the actual cooking of things like ribs and such ...hell a monkey can do it

 

best of luck to you and happy cooking

post #37 of 38
What I find crazy about BBQ is the many opinions and ways to do things. You can have 2 people grow up next door to each other all their life. They can view what smoker is better, to sauce or not sauce and even the rubs can be completely diffrent, but bottom line what matters is who he/she is cooking for. I have talked with several competition teams and they all have said basically the same thing. The way they cook at home on the weekends is no where the same as they cook for competitions. The same goes for professional Chef's that do the culinary competitions.

I have been a proffesional Chef for over 26 years, been to culinary school and did a 3 year apprenticeship. I feel very confident in my skills in cooking, teaching and leading my team in preparing for thousands at a time in the catering/banquet environment. However I feel I have been given the gift of knowledge from this site full of home backyard Chef's more times than I have been able to give to them. In my humble opinion it is ridiculous for anyone with any level of experience to not be open minded to others opinion and ways to do things.

Looking at other recipes, methods and views is the only way we can grow and become better. I do have my opinions on how to do many things, but I always keep my eyes open to maybe pick up on something new.

So my advice to those that are looking at the diffrence in recipes out there and why there are so many diffrent ones. Well it is simple. They all have their opions on how it should be done. So, try the ones that sound good, keep notes on what you like and don't like. And over time, you will develop YOUR way of doing that item.

Keep things simple!!!!

Jeramy
post #38 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by jarjarchef View Post

What I find crazy about BBQ is the many opinions and ways to do things. You can have 2 people grow up next door to each other all their life. They can view what smoker is better, to sauce or not sauce and even the rubs can be completely diffrent, but bottom line what matters is who he/she is cooking for. I have talked with several competition teams and they all have said basically the same thing. The way they cook at home on the weekends is no where the same as they cook for competitions. The same goes for professional Chef's that do the culinary competitions.

I have been a proffesional Chef for over 26 years, been to culinary school and did a 3 year apprenticeship. I feel very confident in my skills in cooking, teaching and leading my team in preparing for thousands at a time in the catering/banquet environment. However I feel I have been given the gift of knowledge from this site full of home backyard Chef's more times than I have been able to give to them. In my humble opinion it is ridiculous for anyone with any level of experience to not be open minded to others opinion and ways to do things.

Looking at other recipes, methods and views is the only way we can grow and become better. I do have my opinions on how to do many things, but I always keep my eyes open to maybe pick up on something new.

So my advice to those that are looking at the diffrence in recipes out there and why there are so many diffrent ones. Well it is simple. They all have their opions on how it should be done. So, try the ones that sound good, keep notes on what you like and don't like. And over time, you will develop YOUR way of doing that item.

Keep things simple!!!!

Jeramy

Well said Jeramy ! icon14.gif

Justin
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