or Connect
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Smoking Meat (and other things) › Sausage › Recent Dry Cure Salami
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Recent Dry Cure Salami - Page 2

post #21 of 29
SMB.... morning .... did you open the link and read about B-LC-007.... It should have answered your questions....
As an interesting note, when these sausages were first being made, there was no refrigeration or humidity control... With the advent of "cultures" and specifically designated "Target" cultures, the process has become much safer and works under a wider range of environmental conditions... probably not exactly the same as 2-300 years ago but close enough for a quality product...




Bactoferm™ B-LC-007 is a patented culture blend capable of acidification as well as preventing growth of Listeria. The culture produces pediocin and bavaricin (think of them like a kind of "antibiotics") that keeps Listeria monocytogenes at safe levels by the additional hurdle thrown at it.

It is recommended to use this culture at low fermentation temperatures between 64-75ºF for the production of European style products with very low acid profiles.

This culture makes T-SPX obsolete due to all the additional beneficial strains that come with it. You want the added yeast and both cocci strains for flavor development predominantly, and this blend has it all. Because the fermentation temperature is low as well we suggest this culture is a game changer by offering so much more than T-SPX. This blend offers added Listeria protection, where T-SPX does not. Both forms of cocci bacteria work together in developing the characteristic flavors of fermented sausages, while also reducing the residual amount of nitrite in your product due to their secretion of enzymes that cause the reduction of the residual nitrite in the sausage. So you end up consuming less in the final product than using a culture blend with these beneficial bacteria. B-LC-007 is truly a superior culture to use for low temperature fermentation.
post #22 of 29

Dave...

 

I did read the link and saved it for later reference. Maybe I misunderstood something. I can understand the temperature (64-75 F) being acceptable when using B-LC-007 but doesn't one need to control humidity as well? Maybe by means of dehumidifier or humidifier, whichever may be proper for the locale?

 

SMB

post #23 of 29
Since nepas lives in Florida, I think the humidity is probably already at 80%.... and a closet at 64-75 Deg. F.... WIN-WIN situation... no need for any controls....

A glass dish with saturated ammonium sulphate in distilled water provides perfect humidity, if that's a problem....

A new member here, Evan M. Brady has some spectacular pictures of the Aged, Dried, Fermented products he makes also... Since he is commercial, he made a curing chamber....

.... click on pic to enlarge .....
post #24 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SMOKIN' BURT View Post
 


nepas...

 

I'm going to assume that you dried these under a "controlled" humidity and temperature environment. If so, did you build your own drying chamber? I have been interested in doing this for some time and have read the book by the Marianski bros. about dry curing and fermenting. I have also visited Len Poli's site many, many times but for some reason I'm still gun-shy. Are you doing this in FLA where it's very humid and not a good environment for dry curing? If so, you must have built some kind of drying/curing chamber. Please elaborate... inquiring minds wanna know!!

 

SMB

I used to live in NEPA and did have a cure cabinet. Up there you will need one as the temp and R/H are a problem. Since moving to GA and FL i have found i do not need a cure cabinet. Temps here are perfect for fermentation and the R/H is just about spot on. In the RV i dont need any fancy controls or cabinets.

 

Here is my dry cure fridge when i lived in a sticks N bricks house.

 

I have B-LC-007 but have not used it yet, Need to use up my TSPX 1st

post #25 of 29


Thank you nepas...

 

Since you came from my neck o' the woods... I'm sure you understand my concerns. I have an old upright freezer that I've considered building a drying chamber from using the plans that Len Poli's friend provided. Very nice looking sausages you've posted pics of...gotta love that sopresetta!

 

And thank you to DaveOmak as well for the info you provided!

 

SMB

post #26 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SMOKIN' BURT View Post
 


Thank you nepas...

 

Since you came from my neck o' the woods... I'm sure you understand my concerns. I have an old upright freezer that I've considered building a drying chamber from using the plans that Len Poli's friend provided. Very nice looking sausages you've posted pics of...gotta love that sopresetta!

 

And thank you to DaveOmak as well for the info you provided!

 

SMB


YW

 

If your interested in building one may i suggest a frost free fridge with the freezer on the bottom, they work well. Or a smaller type igloo that is just a fridge. Use one with a compressor. I have used a wine cooler that uses the electronic cooling but they are not as good. You will need controls for the temp of the fridge and for the R/H and a small coolmist ultrasonic humidifier. Try to stay away from a fan inside the cabinet as this will cause case hardening of the product.

 

I have seen small (fridge only) type at Sams and Lowes for under 150

post #27 of 29


nepas...

 

The freezer I have is just that, a freezer. Not a fridge/freezer combo and I don't know if it's a frost free design. It has a relatively large chamber which I thought would be nice for hanging longer sausages. Do you think that's not the way to go? It's steel lined on the inside so I could always use it to build a smoker instead.

 

SMB

post #28 of 29

Quote:

THOSE REALLY LOOK MARVELOUS...

 

Originally Posted by nepas View Post
 

Thanks

 

Couple more pics.

 

 

Sop

post #29 of 29

DaveOmark Thanks for the reference to B L C 007 I will have to see if I can find anything here in NZ that represents it.

 

It may go a long way to helping with my current fermenting problem.

 

Generally I use the "hang in the shed on a stick" principle, and it has worked fine for me over the last 2 or 3 years. Lately I have been getting too much fermentation going on resulting in hollows in the product ( air pockets ) I use buttermilk as my culture starter. Perhaps the cultures in the buttermilk have changed ?or maybe the sugar reaction with the cultures is taking place to rapidly?

Anyone got any thoughts?

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Sausage
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Smoking Meat (and other things) › Sausage › Recent Dry Cure Salami