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Help Pork Butts Sucked - Page 2

post #21 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by timberjet View Post

Do you know for sure if your wood was seasoned enough? Green wood will cause that. Also let the smoker get going and stabilize for 45 min. At least. An hour is better. Kbb burns best for lower and more stabile temps. Stay away from competition though, it burns much hotter than regular. Clean the ash out every time and knock it down every so often during the smoke.

Well I'm not sure, I don't really check.  I just buy bags of chunks from Lowe's or Home Depot and just assume it's seasoned enough.  What about chunks with the bark on them.  I've read or heard that the bark can cause creosote?  Should I take the bark off those chunks before using them? 

 

Going to start using KBB for sure and put sand in the water pan like others above have said and hope that stabilizes the temps.  

post #22 of 25

I've been following this thread and have been hesitant to jump in.  .

 

Set aside the causes of green wood, dirty burn, stale air flow early in smoke, ash covering the meat either from heavy deposits below the grate getting picked up by the airflow, or too vigorously knocking ash off the coals mid-smoke.  I've never removed bark.  I've used both store bought wood and wood from the white oak tree in my back yard, some of which was probably aged only 6 months early on.  And I've used the top vent to bring down temps both early and late in a smoke with no bad results.  Basically, I've committed every smoking sin you can.  My wife is a supertaster and I just asked her if we've ever had a meat I smoked/cooked that tasted like lighter fluid or creosote and her answer was the same as mine: no. 

 

Now, all that said, to the OP I say go smell your bag of RO lump.  I was hesitant to jump in because I don't want to start a charcoal preference war, but I have one bag of RO Lump charcoal in the garage I have been hesitant to use because it has a lighter fluid or paint-like smell.  The other bag of RO I bought at the same time smelled like burnt wood.  This bag has been sitting unused for almost a year and a half because the odor was noticeable as soon as I opened the bag.  My spider sense said pass and I have.  The smell is less now than it was originally, but it is still there.  I just went and checked. 

 

Finally, don't sweat the temp swings on a butt/shoulder.  That piece of meat can take any temp you throw at it as long as it is in the safety zone, even 100F swings.  Swings mess with your timing but I've yet to meet a pork butt that could tell time.     


Edited by Noboundaries - 5/25/15 at 1:57pm
post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noboundaries View Post

 

Now, all that said, to the OP I say go smell your bag of RO lump.  I was hesitant to jump in because I don't want to start a charcoal preference war, but I have one bag of RO Lump charcoal in the garage I have been hesitant to use because it has a lighter fluid or paint-like smell.  The other bag of RO I bought at the same time smelled like burnt wood.  This bag has been sitting unused for almost a year and a half because the odor was noticeable as soon as I opened the bag.  My spider sense said pass and I have.  The smell is less now than it was originally, but it is still there.  I just went and checked. 

 

I also have a blue RO bag of Star Grill that has the exact same thing. This is a good possibility as well.

post #24 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noboundaries View Post
 

I've been following this thread and have been hesitant to jump in.  .

 

Set aside the causes of green wood, dirty burn, stale air flow early in smoke, ash covering the meat either from heavy deposits below the grate getting picked up by the airflow, or too vigorously knocking ash off the coals mid-smoke.  I've never removed bark.  I've used both store bought wood and wood from the white oak tree in my back yard, some of which was probably aged only 6 months early on.  And I've used the top vent to bring down temps both early and late in a smoke with no bad results.  Basically, I've committed every smoking sin you can.  My wife is a supertaster and I just asked her if we've ever had a meat I smoked/cooked that tasted like lighter fluid or creosote and her answer was the same as mine: no. 

 

Now, all that said, to the OP I say go smell your bag of RO lump.  I was hesitant to jump in because I don't want to start a charcoal preference war, but I have one bag of RO Lump charcoal in the garage I have been hesitant to use because it has a lighter fluid or paint-like smell.  The other bag of RO I bought at the same time smelled like burnt wood.  This bag has been sitting unused for almost a year and a half because the odor was noticeable as soon as I opened the bag.  My spider sense said pass and I have.  The smell is less now than it was originally, but it is still there.  I just went and checked. 

 

Finally, don't sweat the temp swings on a butt/shoulder.  That piece of meat can take any temp you throw at it as long as it is in the safety zone, even 100F swings.  Swings mess with your timing but I've yet to meet a pork butt that could tell time.     

Funny you mentioned this because last night I fired up a chimney of RO lump for the grill to cook steaks and hamburgers on since it burns hot and while it was burning in the chimney and getting ready to dump it in the grill I got a wiff of the smoke that was coming off it and the first thought that went through my head was "that smells just like those butts smelled and tasted".  I wondered then if the smoke from the charcoal is what gave it the weird taste and smell but I'm a newb and just wasn't sure.  Plus the chicken legs and brisket didn't have this smell and taste.  I wonder if I didn't let the charcoal burn down enough on the initial start cause I put the meat on not long after I dumped the chimney of coal in?     I've already decided to start using KBB so hopefully I don't have this problem anymore.  

post #25 of 25

I have not had good luck with lump on long cooks. I think some is better than others for sure. KBB is your friend. Just whatever coal you use make sure you let it go long enough befoe you start cooking. I use my UDS most which is just like your cooker but home made and if you don't let it warm up and stabilize before you put your stuff on it it is not as good. I just can't seem to get good enough results myself with that lump stuff. But I don't have a lot of choices where I live. I want to start making my own but the neighbor and his dang meat processing facility uses up all the neighborhood wood these days. Dang.

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