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Drippage

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

My first real post of a question…so “hey” all!

 

Tomorrow I’ll be smoking a couple corned beef brisket in to pastrami and also smoking country style pork ribs. I am big on multi-tasking and really want to start packing my Masterbuilt with a variety of meats to smoke all at the same time.

 

I know this flies against purists who demand certain meats be smoked with certain woods only, but I’ll probably be making a lot of experts here shake their head ruefully as I defy tradition at nearly every turn! Forgive me.

 

So, how to layer? Would you let the pastrami drip on the ribs? Other way around? Layer a foil sheet on a rack in between to guard from cross-dripping? I’m thinking the pastrami on top because it doesn’t have as much fat as the ribs and will drip less…and pastrami seasoning may be better dripping on ribs than confusing the pastrami’s flavor with pork fat, BBQ rub and such.

 

I will be dry rubbing the pastrami with…pastrami rub of course, a recipe I probably got here a ways back before joining. I’ll be rubbing the ribs with the BBQ rub I have refined over time and use on all my ribs. All will rest, rubbed, in the fridge overnight. The Pastrami will come out of the smoker then be wrapped in plastic wrap and rest for two days in the fridge before slicing.

 

Anyone ever load fish, chicken, pork and beef all at the same time? How do you deal with drippings if so? What’s a good wood for everything?

 

I have alder, mesquite and pecan chips to work with. I’m thinking pecan would be a good compromise for pork and beef together…but maybe a fist full of everything, eh?

post #2 of 10

I would either place the ribs on top and let them drip on the pastrami or catch the rib drippings. I wouldn't want the strong pastrami seasonings to end up on ribs.

 

As for smoking multiple meats, The consensus on here is that it is fine with the exception of strong flavored fish (like salmon) that will leave everything else tasting like fish.

 

I think you will be fine with the pecan chips. I have used pecan on most meats and the flavor matches up really well. 

post #3 of 10
Hey Chef K-Dude!

First off, don't worry about flummoxing the so called "Purists"...you're not cooking for them, you're cooking for yourself! We all pretty much do things the way that works best for us.

Now, as far as meats dripping in a multi-meat cook...

With regards to Pork and Beef, I would probably put the pork on top, but IMO it doesn't make much difference which drips on which. It may depend on how heavily seasoned the meats are...and in that case I'd probably put the lesser-seasoned meat on the top. But I'm not sure there's a wrong answer to the question.

Now it's a different story with poultry, IMO. I always put poultry on the bottom-most rack to avoid any chance of cross contamination. I don't want raw poultry dripping on other foods. Can't really say with fish...when I smoke fish there's never anything else in the smoker.

HTH...

Red
post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 

Great feedback B, thanks.

 

I suppose the pork drippings would add an interesting flavor to the pastrami and I can see how the strong prominent coriander flavor might be off-putting on ribs now that you mention it.

 

Gives me the idea that I should look in to fabricating some pans to fit my racks almost exactly and make them so they hang below the rack so I don’t use up the rack below for the pan if doing a full box and still allows for complete circulation of smoke.

 

I could even make them as more of a shield that slopes toward the back and drips behind the racks below.

 

Hmmm…

post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thanks Red!

 

My momma literally beat the independence in to me, so I’m always bucking the system! Problem for her is it backfired when I was a teen…I took her literally and did “what I wanted to do” just like she told me…much to her dismay! She’s proud of me now though and I appreciate those woopin’s.

 

Looks like the consensus so far is pork on top. I am looking forward to getting many opinions on many things here.

 

The poultry does make sense and also not smoking fish with anything else.

 

Now I’m thinking “drip guards”. As a custom metal fabricator this would be easy to do for me and I always have stainless sheet remnants on hand.

 

I’m so happy to be getting back to smoking…first of the year for me tomorrow. It’s going to be beautiful here in Virginia…a little breezy though so that may be a small challenge.

post #6 of 10

I would put the pastrami on top if you're going to do both. My preference is to smoke ribs and pastrami separately at different temps though. Ribs at 230-240 and pastrami at 170-180. Just my .02.

post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thanks Chewmeister,

 

You are thinking the same thing I was thinking at first. This is why I love getting a lot of input. I don’t cook from a lot of rigid recipes, I read dozens of recipes on something I want to make, make a few notes, get a mental picture and just let ‘er rip.

 

Interesting on your pastrami temp, I don’t run across a lot of recipes smoking that low. I suppose the gentler cooking either makes the meat more moist or tender or at the least gets a ton of smoke on it.

 

Do you smoke the whole time or stop after a period of time? How long does a brisket take (I know size is a factor) compared to smoking at say 225 and even higher like so many are doing?

post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef K-Dude View Post
 

Thanks Chewmeister,

 

You are thinking the same thing I was thinking at first. This is why I love getting a lot of input. I don’t cook from a lot of rigid recipes, I read dozens of recipes on something I want to make, make a few notes, get a mental picture and just let ‘er rip.

 

Interesting on your pastrami temp, I don’t run across a lot of recipes smoking that low. I suppose the gentler cooking either makes the meat more moist or tender or at the least gets a ton of smoke on it.

 

Do you smoke the whole time or stop after a period of time? How long does a brisket take (I know size is a factor) compared to smoking at say 225 and even higher like so many are doing?


My reasoning is that a pork butt cooked for pulled pork or a brisket cooked as BBQ are not cured and therefore need to be smoked at a higher temp to stay within safe limits and are taken to a higher IT of 200+. Pastrami whether made from brisket or another cut of beef, is a cured product and are finished to a much lower IT, usually 152-165. The lower smoking temp helps retain some moisture, and like any other cured product  to a lower IT. The time depends on the thickness of the cut you are using. I recently made some pastrami from an eye of round roast mainly due to the lower cost of the cut and it took 10 hours to get to 155 IT. The last time I used a brisket, it took only 6.5 hours.

post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 

Good info Chewmeister,

 

Thanks

post #10 of 10

Try some small foil cookie sheets from the grocery store - when done with the smoke toss (or clean). That will keep the juices separate - you can also put a cookie/cake cooling rack in the pans, and the meat to be smoked on the rack, which will allow the smoke to penetrate the whole slab of meat. 

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