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WSM Melting? - Page 2

post #21 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by timberjet View Post
 

I would suggest you spray some cooking spray in there and coat everything after you burn the factory oils off. Then you can just cook away.

 

I thought I read in the WSM Owners section that spraying was not needed due to the porcelain coating. Maybe I read it wrong. th_dunno-1[1].gif

post #22 of 31

For my first cook on my new 18.5" WSM, I did a double smoked ham at Easter. I did fill the water pan because I read that they run hot for the first while. I found that the steam produced by the water mixed with the soot and oils inside the chamber and were running down and out the vents. It made quite a mess and I had to put cardboard under it to soak up the black oozing fluid.

My second cook was some ribs. I did not put any water in the pan and just foiled over the top to keep it clean. No more ooz! I was amazed to get a solid 7 hours out of the one load of lump charcoal and some hickory chunks. I didn't need that long, but was curious to see how long  could go for doing overnight cooks.

I found my lid thermometer was reading low by anywhere from 20 to 40 deg.F

post #23 of 31

WSM owner since 2005 here. 

 

There is no need to spray, rub, wipe, or otherwise put anything on the interior of a new WSM.  The metal is sealed under a porcelain enamel coating and it does not need to be seasoned or otherwise protected.  That porcelain coating can take one hell of an amount of heat also (yes, I've had a grease fire before).

 

Just cook something on the new WSM and it will naturally start to build up a smoke coating on the inside.  A new WSM may run a little hotter (say 10 or 15*) until that coating is created, but there is no need to season a WSM.

post #24 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by dward51 View Post

WSM owner since 2005 here. 

There is no need to spray, rub, wipe, or otherwise put anything on the interior of a new WSM.  The metal is sealed under a porcelain enamel coating and it does not need to be seasoned or otherwise protected.  That porcelain coating can take one hell of an amount of heat also (yes, I've had a grease fire before).

Just cook something on the new WSM and it will naturally start to build up a smoke coating on the inside.  A new WSM may run a little hotter (say 10 or 15*) until that coating is created, but there is no need to season a WSM.

yeahthat.gif
Pork butt works good!
post #25 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by DukeBurger View Post
 

 

I thought I read in the WSM Owners section that spraying was not needed due to the porcelain coating. Maybe I read it wrong. th_dunno-1%5B1%5D.gif


You are correct with the porcelain coating you just need to run it at 300° for about an hour or so then toss on some chicken and have dinner! For first time users I highly suggest you either fill the water pan with sand/gravel with foil on top or water. Having that thermal mass really helps with keeping stable temps - especially when they are new.

post #26 of 31
Hello,

Wow, I'm glad you and everything is safe.

I have a 22" and a 14" and I may not be the best smoker on these boards but here is what I do.

Any kind of charcoal or wood smoker produces fire. You have no control over wind. A stong gust of wind can knock it over while you are at the supermarket picking up ribs. I never leave my smoker unattended.

If you plan on competing then use the bacon grease, cooking spray or evoo inside of it to season. If your not, season it with a pork shoulder, use your dampers to adjust the temperature. Yes the temps will run hotter for the first few cooks but that's normal. Pork shoulder has enough grease and it cooks for hours. Pork shoulder is a forgiving meat. You can cook it at 220 up to 350. No peice of bacon is worth a grease fire. And at the end of the cook you have dinner. Country style ribs is another option. If your afraid it will come out dry, use a basting spray.

No smoker is worth putting you and your family in a dangerous situation.
post #27 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DukeBurger View Post
 


That's great you were able to exchange it! :thumbsup:

 

Good luck with your new WSM and don't worry about seasoning this one! Bring it up to 250-300F for about an hour to burn off any oils, then throw some food on!

 

th_wsmsmile0ly.gif

Thanks Duke! I brought it up to about 250 for an hour, then down to 230F, then put 24 chicken thighs in it! They came out perfect and now I can say I have smoked some chicken!

 

There is a nice thin coat of seasoning now, the first of many to come.

 

Here is the thread on the chicken cook - http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/187476/first-wsm-trial-with-chicken

post #28 of 31

Hey ...thanks a mil for posting about this.  I'm about to season my new 18.5 WSM, which I've been wanting for a looong time.  I can't imagine how sad you felt when you came home to find out that something went wrong.  I would also think that the unit should've been designed to be able to run with vents full open, dry bowl, and not damage the unit ...I'd give Weber a call and discuss it with them.

 

As for the Soo recommendation on covering the bowl with foil ...I found the instructions online too and found the foil covering piece to be a little confusing.  For example, if  you cover the bowl with foil flat across the top, then grease will drip down on it and run over the side into the coals ...a fire hazard I would think.  And why cover the bowl in the first place?  He's got you doing the first hot run with no meat in the BBQ, so why not just let it get hot?  I foiled the inside of my bowl yesterday at noon, filled with hot water, then ran a full-on load of briquettes (Kingsford Competition) ...vents wide open, and a couple of chunks of (unknown type) freezer-burned beef from our chest freezer (grease source for seasoning).  My WSM, in about 45 F (or slightly cooler - Alaska), heated to only about 275 F peak ...I figured it would get hotter, but it didn't.  I installed a Cajun Bandit (I think) Nomex gasket for the lid and the Cajun Bandit door while the BBQ was new and unused (best gluing) though, so mine probably has less air infiltration than others at this point.  It ran steady clear until we went to bed at 8pm (we get up at 4am), maintaining 250-275 all along.  Boy is this thing easier than trying to do low and slow with a Weber kettle!!!!  Very happy so far ...gonna do a hot run tonight, then a greaser run tomorrow, then cook for the first time this coming weekend... ought to be a party ...the septic pumping guy is coming over on Saturday ...I wonder what ribs and poo smells like together in the backyard?  Yechh.....

 

Brian

post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrazosBrian View Post
 

Hey ...thanks a mil for posting about this.  I'm about to season my new 18.5 WSM, which I've been wanting for a looong time.  I can't imagine how sad you felt when you came home to find out that something went wrong.  I would also think that the unit should've been designed to be able to run with vents full open, dry bowl, and not damage the unit ...I'd give Weber a call and discuss it with them.

 

As for the Soo recommendation on covering the bowl with foil ...I found the instructions online too and found the foil covering piece to be a little confusing.  For example, if  you cover the bowl with foil flat across the top, then grease will drip down on it and run over the side into the coals ...a fire hazard I would think.  And why cover the bowl in the first place?  He's got you doing the first hot run with no meat in the BBQ, so why not just let it get hot?  I foiled the inside of my bowl yesterday at noon, filled with hot water, then ran a full-on load of briquettes (Kingsford Competition) ...vents wide open, and a couple of chunks of (unknown type) freezer-burned beef from our chest freezer (grease source for seasoning).  My WSM, in about 45 F (or slightly cooler - Alaska), heated to only about 275 F peak ...I figured it would get hotter, but it didn't.  I installed a Cajun Bandit (I think) Nomex gasket for the lid and the Cajun Bandit door while the BBQ was new and unused (best gluing) though, so mine probably has less air infiltration than others at this point.  It ran steady clear until we went to bed at 8pm (we get up at 4am), maintaining 250-275 all along.  Boy is this thing easier than trying to do low and slow with a Weber kettle!!!!  Very happy so far ...gonna do a hot run tonight, then a greaser run tomorrow, then cook for the first time this coming weekend... ought to be a party ...the septic pumping guy is coming over on Saturday ...I wonder what ribs and poo smells like together in the backyard?  Yechh.....

 

Brian

 

The foil is to make clean up easier. Take two large (restraunt sized foil) pieces of foil (approx. 2.5 ft. long), lay one piece on top of other piece so the long edges match up. Fold along the long edge a 1/4 to 1/2 wide fold the entire length, repeat that fold 4 or 5 times. Open the folded foil like a book and then gently form that to your water pan. Then after you dump your water after the smoke you just pull out the foil and wipe the pan out with some paper towels.

post #30 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by JIRodriguez View Post
 

 

The foil is to make clean up easier. Take two large (restraunt sized foil) pieces of foil (approx. 2.5 ft. long), lay one piece on top of other piece so the long edges match up. Fold along the long edge a 1/4 to 1/2 wide fold the entire length, repeat that fold 4 or 5 times. Open the folded foil like a book and then gently form that to your water pan. Then after you dump your water after the smoke you just pull out the foil and wipe the pan out with some paper towels.

 

Thanks for the detailed info.  I understand the clean-up reasoning.  My confusion, and I may be entirely backward in my memory banks, was that I thought the Soo fellow suggested wrapping the bowl in foil for the initial 'hot run' that had no meat in it at all ...just charcoal (possibly with wood?).  I figured that a) if there's nothing to drip then nothing to clean, right?  And b) description of pressing the foil down into the bowl might prevent someone from misunderstanding and causing a fire.  All can be cleared up with Google... and I'll do that tonight!

 

Brian

post #31 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrazosBrian View Post
 

 

Thanks for the detailed info.  I understand the clean-up reasoning.  My confusion, and I may be entirely backward in my memory banks, was that I thought the Soo fellow suggested wrapping the bowl in foil for the initial 'hot run' that had no meat in it at all ...just charcoal (possibly with wood?).  I figured that a) if there's nothing to drip then nothing to clean, right?  And b) description of pressing the foil down into the bowl might prevent someone from misunderstanding and causing a fire.  All can be cleared up with Google... and I'll do that tonight!

 

Brian

 

I would also agree that the Soo method should have been more descriptive about the foil. I've since read on this forum that a lot of people use sand instead of water which I'll be doing today for my rib cook.

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