or Connect
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Smoking Meat (and other things) › Making Jerky › Jerky from corned beef
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Jerky from corned beef

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Anyone with experience making jerky from store bought corned beef flat, please speak up.

I usually use Pop's brine cure when I make my jerky.  I like the flavor and have never had anyone I've given some to, bring it back and say "Yech!".

 

But I got to thinking... what if I bought a corned beef flat from the store, already brined, with those little packet of seasoning in them.

If I discard the packet, the meat should be the same as what I have been doing.  Right? 

I would soak it to remove some salt, because I know it would be saltier than the brine I use.

 

What I am wondering about is, if they inject any other flavors into meat, other than basic brine & cure, or not.

That could change the jerky flavor a lot.

 

If you know for sure, that it is only injected with brine and Nitrite, then I think I would be inclined to use it.

 

Please give me the results of your use of corned beef for jerky.

 

Thanks for your help!

post #2 of 10

Brisket would make for some tough jerky, too much fat and connective tissue. 

post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 


You're probable right.  I didn't think of that.  It's lean if trimmed well, but connective tissue is why it takes so long to get it tender. 

I won't buy any yet, unless someone changes my mind about it.

post #4 of 10

Actually it makes great jerky. First though you need to smoke it like you would for pastrami, take it up to whatever temp it takes to get tender. The one I did last week hit perfect tenderness at 197° http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/181949/when-the-cats-away. Let the corned beef cool down, then slice as thick as you like. I like to slice mine around a 1/4" thick. Then dry. Since I do not have a dehydrator I use my GOSM and run the temp around 160°. I don't add smoke since I run the smoke during the initial cook. Check the meat every 45 minutes to an hour to see how it is. Pastrami jerky is tasty!

 

Oh yeah if you go with the store bought corned beef soak the guy for a good hour, changing the water after 30 minutes. Gets rid of some of the salt.

post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 

I have no doubt that is good tasting Case.  I'm sure I would eat it and love it,  but... you're missing my intent, which was to save time from brining.  Just go to seasoning and drying.

 

I don't think I want to take 13 to 15 hours of cooking and tending the smoke, for my jerky meat to become tender, and then another 4-5 hours to dry.  Also I like drying mine from raw, rather than "cooked first" meat.  But like I said, I bet I would still eat yours if I had an opportunity.  LOL

post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by fpmich View Post

I have no doubt that is good tasting Case.  I'm sure I would eat it and love it,  but... you're missing my intent, which was to save time from brining.  Just go to seasoning and drying.

I don't think I want to take 13 to 15 hours of cooking and tending the smoke, for my jerky meat to become tender, and then another 4-5 hours to dry.  Also I like drying mine from raw, rather than "cooked first" meat.  But like I said, I bet I would still eat yours if I had an opportunity.  LOL

Well you didn't mention anything about saving time! It is a great jerky once it's done and well worth the time it takes to make!
It would save you the brine time though so there's something!
post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 


You're right Case.  I didn't specifically mention time saving.  I apologize for thinking you would know that.

 

That's the difference between internet talking, and "face to face" talking.  Meanings get left out with typing, that would be understood in "face to face" conservations.  I make this same mistake, over and over again, on the net.  What I'm thinking, and what I'm typing, doesn't always remain clear.  Also I'm guilty of misunderstanding what someone else has wrote.

 

There should be a rule.

If you post back and forth more than 3-4 times, then you can't post to each other again, until at least, a phone call between the two people occurs.

LOL

 

I bet that would go a long way towards misunderstandings on the net.

post #8 of 10

I was actually thinking the other day about making some jerky out of my leftover Corned Beef because I had alot of it left over. I ended up giving it all away to my friend and his wife. Next time!

post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtsailor2003 View Post
 

Actually it makes great jerky. First though you need to smoke it like you would for pastrami, take it up to whatever temp it takes to get tender. The one I did last week hit perfect tenderness at 197° http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/181949/when-the-cats-away. Let the corned beef cool down, then slice as thick as you like. I like to slice mine around a 1/4" thick. Then dry. Since I do not have a dehydrator I use my GOSM and run the temp around 160°. I don't add smoke since I run the smoke during the initial cook. Check the meat every 45 minutes to an hour to see how it is. Pastrami jerky is tasty!

 

Oh yeah if you go with the store bought corned beef soak the guy for a good hour, changing the water after 30 minutes. Gets rid of some of the salt.

I'm not trying to start an argument.  I do know that this sounds really good.  I love a good project so I think I'll give it a try.  But I also see the point that if i'm in a rush, this won't work.  Thanks for the idea. 

post #10 of 10
I've made jerky out of brisket twice now. I sliced it, did a "shake'n'bake" with a cure/seasoning from Cabela's for 24hrs in a ziplock then smoked at 180 to an IT of 165, per the cure. Only took 7hrs and I was very pleased with the results.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Making Jerky
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Smoking Meat (and other things) › Making Jerky › Jerky from corned beef