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Are all pellets created equal? - Page 2

post #21 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJohnson View Post


Ding....Ding.....Ding!!!!
We Have a Winner!
You totally "Get It!"

When your pellet grill gets to temp, it's just not producing much smoke.  The pellets are burning more efficiently, in-order to produce higher BTU's, so they produce less smoke.  Let the pellets in the hopper produce heat, and the Tube produce smoke.  Best of both worlds!

An Oak Based pellet like BBQrs Delight actually produce pretty darn good smoke in the Tube Smoker.  It may not be as strong as Hickory, but oak still has a good flavor.


I was very pleased with BBQ delight and B & B pellets. Good smoke flavor and low ash output. And for $12 a 20lb bag on B & B pellets it's a great deal. I like oak as a base wood much better than alder and I also think it's a good flavor wood too.

I have a PID on my traeger so it is very efficient and doesn't produce enough smoke for my tastes...hence the Amazn tube and 100% flavor wood like hickory, cherry or mesquite.
post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by CueInCO View Post

Another happy Cookingpellets.com customer here. I use the Perfect Mix and the 100% Hickory. My only complaint is that the shipping cost is almost the same as the cost of the pellets. 

As to SeenRed's description above, some folks have said that the Traeger pellets use alder with added oil to flavor one way or the other. I asked a sales guy at Costco who was hustling Traeger grills and he claimed that they were all natural. Have no idea who's right but I've chosen not use the Traeger ones even though I have two 20 pound bags sitting in my basement. It would be nice to get a definitive answer on how they're made. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Okie52 View Post

Traegers pellets do use a 70% alder 30% flavor wood blend west of the Mississippi which is why the pellets smoke/flavor is not very strong.

Yes traeger is "all natural" wood its just not the wood they say it is? Most of their blends are 70% alder and 30% flavor wood (west of the Mississippi) with the exceptions of hickory and mesquite which are 100% alder with some flavor wood oil added!

I bought 60 lbs of traeger "hickory" pellets when my local Costco had them on sale for under $10! I figure that I usually use them to smoke fish at home and alder goes great with fish...
post #23 of 31

I just learned a lot about pellets 

 

Gary

post #24 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Welshrarebit View Post


Yes traeger is "all natural" wood its just not the wood they say it is? Most of their blends are 70% alder and 30% flavor wood (west of the Mississippi) with the exceptions of hickory and mesquite which are 100% alder with some flavor wood oil added!

I bought 60 lbs of traeger "hickory" pellets when my local Costco had them on sale for under $10! I figure that I usually use them to smoke fish at home and alder goes great with fish...

$10 a bag is a pretty good price even if you just use it for fuel.

Kind of makes me laugh when traeger insists that you use only traeger pellets or you'll void your warranty.
post #25 of 31

After a year of smoking I finally cleaned the inside of my smoker (I know I am horrible), and there was about 5 to 6 cups worth of ash in the smoker.  This was with running only Bear Mountain pellets, but I did have it up to 425 a few times to do pizzas.

post #26 of 31

I don't want to ask a stupid question, but here it is: Where do you place the tube smoker during the cook? I like the idea of using cheaper pellets for fuel and heat, and better pellets in your tube smoker for flavor. I'm new to pellet smokers and I just purchased a Camp Chef PG24LS and I'm looking forward to eating some of my mistakes along the way. :biggrin:

post #27 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrshep70 View Post

I don't want to ask a stupid question, but here it is: Where do you place the tube smoker during the cook? I like the idea of using cheaper pellets for fuel and heat, and better pellets in your tube smoker for flavor. I'm new to pellet smokers and I just purchased a Camp Chef PG24LS and I'm looking forward to eating some of my mistakes along the way. " src="http://files.smokingmeatforums.com/smilies/biggrin.gif" />


 



Not a stupid question at all...I place the tube across the grates along the back of the smoker, opposite the exhaust stack. Every pellet cooker is a little different, so play with it to decide where is best for your rig. Just don't put it too close to the RTD probe...the heat from the tube could mess with the PID's temp reading

Red
post #28 of 31

Red's Got You Covered

No Creosote! A-Maze-N Smokers

Reply
post #29 of 31

Thanks Red and TJohnson. I've never used a pellet smoker before and I'm sure I will have lots of questions. I'm hoping that the smoker I bought is a fairly descent one. Does anyone on this thread have an opinion on a Camp Chef PG24LS? It lists for $660, but I found one for $379, so I thought it would be a good place to start.

post #30 of 31
I know a few guys who own them and have no issues.

Enjoy!

No Creosote! A-Maze-N Smokers

Reply
post #31 of 31

I am about to buy a Fast Eddy FEC120 but whilst ordering it last week I picked up a Green Mountain Grills "Davy Crockett" and have been playing with it over the weekend. I have written a short post on it here. This was my first play with a pure pellet smoker and I am now hooked. If you are looking at the Camp Chef then the Davy Crockett will be too small for you, however I know someone with the larger "Daniel Boone" model and they are really pleased with that too.

 

If the pellet burners are similar in the Camp Chef then you will not need any additional smoke. I smoked a pork shoulder and 4 racks of ribs over the weekend and there was plenty of smoke without needing an additional smoke generator. The thing I liked most about the Davy Crockett was that it was WiFi connected - and how easy it was to control it from my mobile phone/tablet. You can set the temperature you need remotely and then walk away and forget about it (though a stir of the pellets in the hopper every couple of hours is recommended to keep them moving). Below is the temperature log from over the weekend. The top (lighter) line shows just how steady the cooking temperature remained over the 11 hour cook (from position "3")

 

LL

 

The cost of cooking was great too - about 59p per hour.

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