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Idea

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hello Folks.  Without all the details; I was talking to a mate at work, sort of just rambling about smoking meat and hit on an idea.  I don't know if you have room for this, I don't know if I have room for this yet, but thought I'd pass on the idea.

 

I notice my charcoal bags are damp when I pull them from my shed.  I have also seen folks post about microwaving pellets before use.  I do have sealed plastic buckets for chips and pellets but I now have about 10-12 of those and how sealed they are, who knows.  They take up a lot of room.

 

WELL: when you are making x-ray quality welds your welding rods MUST be kept COMPLETELY dry and being warm also helps.  What many places use is an old fridge with a 100 watt ( or larger ) bulb.  The fridge doesn't need to work, just the light socket working even with the door closed.  IF we keep our charcoal, pellets, and chips in an old fridge and keep a light on they will be dry and ready for use any time.  Even if the fridge is outside in rain in the winter the contents will stay warm and dry.

 

Doesn't need to be an old fridge with metal interior, doesn't need to be that hot.  Just warm and dry.  Just bought this non-working 1952 fridge off EBay for £26.  Metal enamelled interior.  This one will be a smoker ( long story, had to bin my first one ).  Just thought I'd pass on my idea.  Keep Smokin!

Danny

 

Processed By eBay with ImageMagick, z1.1.0. ||B2

 

Processed By eBay with ImageMagick, z1.1.0. ||B2

post #2 of 12
Hi Danny, good idea!

Smokin Monkey
post #3 of 12

That's a great idea Danny, as wood is hydroscopic it will tends to reach the moisture content and humidity of the surrounding air.  

 

I am in the middle of an experiment, where I have dried 1.5 Kg's of Apple chunks in the oven and they have lost over 400g in weigh, and the moisture content has been reduced from between 19 - 22% to under 1%. I have now placed the apple chunks back in the shack and within 1 week the chunks have gained 42g in weight, and the moisture content is back up to between 9 - 12%.

 

I store all our chips & dust in woven polypropylene sacks, and the moisture content remains under 14%.

 

I am Interested in how everyone else stores their Smoking Wood!!

post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

UH HUH!  So can you put that in Redneck speak?  So you are saying it's a good idea??   Smoking Monkey and Wade understand me.  Build fire, throw on meat, when cooked eat meat.  SIMPLE!  :ROTF

Well here I go.  I should just shut up.   BUT in order to PROVE I am dumb as a rock, I will comment!   :hit:

 

So here is the deal.  I know many of you folks are in to the science of smoking.  And in some cases the science is REALLY important.  Cures and such and amount of moisture lost when curing meat etc..  I am starting to get in to some of these things.

 

I have NEVER used a meat therm in my life!  I ALWAYS tell new folks to get a good digital dual probe therm when starting out.  I learned from the old men back in Tx..  These fancy meat therms were not available back then.  You put your hand on the smoker to judge smoker temp and looked at the meat to see how things were progressing.  I do not recommend this for new folks.  I started learning when I was 10-12 yrs. old.  Years of experience new folks can not replicate,

 

Not taking any thing away from your detailed post, I sometimes think the smoking process is over thought.  No disrespect intended.  Curing times and how much cure to use and such are important but the moisture content of the wood???  Having said that if ordering wood off the net and you receive an inferior product ( green wood ) then something must be done.

 

James; DO NOT get me wrong.  Your info IS important and worthy of posting.  GREAT job on doing the research!  That research will be invaluable to someone like Wade who is looking at smoking foods on a commercial level.  Kedep Smokin!

Danny

post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by KC5TPY View Post

UH HUH!  So can you put that in Redneck speak?  So you are saying it's a good idea??   Smoking Monkey and Wade understand me.  Build fire, throw on meat, when cooked eat meat.  SIMPLE!  ROTF.gif
Well here I go.  I should just shut up.   BUT in order to PROVE I am dumb as a rock, I will comment!   hit.gif

So here is the deal.  I know many of you folks are in to the science of smoking.  And in some cases the science is REALLY important.  Cures and such and amount of moisture lost when curing meat etc..  I am starting to get in to some of these things.

I have NEVER used a meat therm in my life!  I ALWAYS tell new folks to get a good digital dual probe therm when starting out.  I learned from the old men back in Tx..  These fancy meat therms were not available back then.  You put your hand on the smoker to judge smoker temp and looked at the meat to see how things were progressing.  I do not recommend this for new folks.  I started learning when I was 10-12 yrs. old.  Years of experience new folks can not replicate,

Not taking any thing away from your detailed post, I sometimes think the smoking process is over thought.  No disrespect intended.  Curing times and how much cure to use and such are important but the moisture content of the wood???  Having said that if ordering wood off the net and you receive an inferior product ( green wood ) then something must be done.

James; DO NOT get me wrong.  Your info IS important and worthy of posting.  GREAT job on doing the research!  That research will be invaluable to someone like Wade who is looking at smoking foods on a commercial level.  Kedep Smokin!
Danny

Danny, forgot to post the photo of you smoking at the First Smoking Weekend Last August.

ROTF.gif

Some people Smoke by instinct, some by science, me middle of the road, but I do like a gadget or two!!!

Smokin Monkey
post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

YEP!!  FIRE! MEAT! EAT! Easy process!  IN FACT!  Being from Texas;  KILL IT ( by gun or pickup truck )!  SKIN IT!  BUILD FIRE!  COOK IT!  EAT IT!  Simple process.  :icon_lol:  Keep Smokin!

Danny

post #7 of 12

My experiment and you posting your thread is purely coincidental. The reason for my experiment is for weight & measures, and to stop me ending up in court and being charged with underselling.  

 

I don't want to sell a thousand 1 Kg bags of chunks today to a store, and a customer complains in September that his 1Kg bag of apple chunks only weigh 900 grams. So I needed to find out how much weight a bag of wood chunks dry out over a period of time, and compensate.  Plus I don't want customers complaining that their dust is damp and they can't light it, so we just check the moisture content.  As any business knows, a good reputation is hard to get, but easy to lose.

 

Just doing what is says on the tin .......Quality Smoking Wood Every Time.

 

What's that saying " necessity is the mother of invention" or something like that.  thumb1%20copy.gif

 

I am a bit like you Smokin Monkey, middle of the road, with a gadget or two.

post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hello.  Now THAT makes perfect sense!  CYA!!!  Never want to be caught with your trousers around your ankles!  :icon_biggrin:  Exactly correct in all business.  I may buy wood from you for the next 5 yrs. and tell no one.  Let me get 1 unsatisfactory order and I tell EVERYONE!  I guess maybe this social media stuff is really a good thing for business.  Folks can now easily leave GOOD comments about the service and products they receive.  Keep Smokin!

Danny

post #9 of 12

Hi Danny

 

The pellets will be fine if stored in their original polythene sacks (undamaged) and even when opened they will keep dry if you clip the top closed with something like a bulldog clip. For the sawdust and charcoal simply pop them in black bin liners as soon as they arrive (other colours are available) and they will stay nice and dry.

 

The moisture is important though because if they are too dry - especially the pellets - they will burn much too fast. Smokewood will probably be able to give you better guidance on the maximum moisture content before they become inefficient. I just store mine in the smokery (aka "shed" :biggrin:) and I don't seem to have a problem lighting mine even in the depths of winter.

post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 

Makes sense Wade.  The pellets are produced from a compacted sawdust.  If too dry POOF!  Have a way with words don't I??  :icon_biggrin:

 

Serious now!  So you reckon as long as they are stored in plastic bags ( I love the big words used here  "polythene".  Is an English thing! )  I should be OK with pellets and chips so long as they are kept in plastic bags??  Thanks for the info.  Keep Smokin!

Danny

post #11 of 12

So long as they are not wet when you put them in and they remain sealed you will be fine. Don't keep them outside though - keep then in a shed or garage.

post #12 of 12

  According to one manufacturer, their pellets have a moisture content of around 8%.

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