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Mavericks

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

I did spares rib today, but came up with a nagging question.  All variables were the same - here were the results:

 

MES 30 generation 2

 

Bottom shelf temperature: 260 -270 ( figured it was due to proximity of coils and heating cylinder.

 

Next to bottom rack: 230 - 239

 

Second from the top rack: 223 - 232

 

Top rack: 219 - 228

 

I can understand that the closer to the top, the lower the temperature due to the open vent (but on the other hand heat rises).  I'm just wondering which rack do I rely on to gauge the actual internal temperature?   Leaving out the bottom rack, I'm still looking at a difference of over 10 degrees.  Where do the pros (meaning the MES posters) position their Mavericks?

post #2 of 5

if there's a definitive answer, i'd like to hear it.

mostly, i do just one big hunk of meat so i put the probe next to it.

i just did 3 racks of back bacon, so i put it on the middle.

 

i've been told to put the probe next to the built in probe, but that makes no sense to me.

post #3 of 5

If intuition serves me correctly, it seems like it makes the most sense to monitor the temperature on the rack where you are cooking the meat.  It seems like cold meat can be quite a heat sink for a while, though, because I think that I get some falsely low readings in the beginning.  But I'm a beginner, so don't take me too seriously!

post #4 of 5
Thread Starter 

I had spare ribs on all 4 racks, which is what started the quest.  A ten degree spread just seems large considering the relative small cooking area in a MES.

post #5 of 5

i wonder if that temp spread is consistant?

i can already tell you that people don't sweat a 10 degree difference in smoker temps.

if you are always within 10 degrees of your target, you're doing great.

i'm getting worse than that, on the same shelf at different temps.

tomorrow, i'm testing the mes at every 20 degrees to see if i can find a pattern.

so far, my temps seem very far off at lower temps, closer around 200 n above.

 

if it was consistantly off by the same number of degrees at all temps it would be easy to adjust for, but it's not.