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Modified home built smoker into a cold smoker. Cheese is the inaugural

post #1 of 37
Thread Starter 

Hey all,

 

I had built the original WallyWill smoker as a small capacity smoker. I got a great deal on a vertical gas smoker so I decided to repurpose it as a cold smoker.

 

I came across the smoke daddy inc. Smokincense and this is the heart of the WallyWill V2.0. 

 

I picked up some mild cheddar, pepper jack, colby jack, and monterey jack(8 ounce blocks) and did the inaugural batch on 19 January. The ambient temperature was 51 degrees F. I cut each block in half and let them sit on the counter for a few minutes before I put them in the smoker

 

I used pecan pellets, and smoked the cheese for about an hour and 45 minutes. 

 

Afterwards, I let the cheese sit uncovered in the fridge for an hour or so uncovered. I used a paper towel to remove any moisture and then tightly wrapped each block in plastic wrap and placed in a ziploc bag

 

My initial plan is to let the cheese sit in the fridge for 2 or 3 weeks and then try a sample. Fingers are crossed.

 

Can anyone see what I have missed? I'm sure I have missed something

 

Thanks in advance

DS

post #2 of 37

You missed the pictures. worthless.gif.

Does it have a good color? I smoke my cheese till I get the color I want. To me color = flavor.

 

 

Happy smoken.

David

post #3 of 37
Thread Starter 


The color is much better in person than the picture

post #4 of 37

BD, those look pretty good from here. Have you gone through Mr. T's smoked cheese thread? A wealth of knowledge and experience from others on here. A couple things just from reading your process, you'll usually want to let the cheese come to room temp fully before putting it in the smoke, most smoke for 3 hours or a bit more (preference of course), and most will leave it lightly covered or uncovered in the fridge over night to even out. 

 

Lots of ways to do it and I'm betting your are still going to be great. Now you need to make more for when that batch is gone!

post #5 of 37

yeahthat.gif Above,

I too smoke until I get the color I am looking for. the one thing I do different is if there is moisture I let sit until dry and do not wipe it off. (my thoughts that may remove added flavor) then wrap in cling wrap for 2-4 weeks in my deep cooler then pull out and then vacume pack. it might not be everyones method but has work for years for me. waxing some is my new play yard / addition thanks to many out there that have helped me make that move.

 

Happy Smoking, it is all good, there are no failures....just some things you might not try/do again :biggrin:

 

Tom

post #6 of 37

I smoked some cheese recently (first try at cheese) and was trying to smoke to color. But after 5 hours in the smoke, the cheese didn't really change color at all.

 

Outside temps were in the 20-30 range.

Smoker temps ranged from 40-76 and averaged probably 55-60.

Cheeses were Mild Cheddar, Sharp Cheddar, Colby/Jack, and some mozzarella String Cheese.

 

I finally took the cheese out after 5 hours and smelled it and it did have that ash tray type smell so I think it definitely got enough smoke. But the cheese was cool to the touch with zero condensation. So, I immediately vacuum sealed it and put it into the fridge. I am cautiously optimistic that it will mellow and turn out well. But, we'll see.

post #7 of 37

It's really interesting, but the color of the cheese will actually change overtime it seems after being smoked, and it will most definitely mellow out.You are going to enjoy it.

post #8 of 37

The mellowing stage is a must!

Happy smoken.

David

post #9 of 37

I totally understand that the mellowing stage is a must. My main point was that it was hard to smoke to color because the color change was so faint it was hard to tell that it had changed at all.

 

I packaged up some smaller pieces that I plan to start sampling after 1, 2, and 4 weeks leaving the larger packages for even longer.

 

The wait is soooo hard. But assuming that this goes well, I plan to get a bunch done to last through the warm summer months where cold smoking can be tough even in ND. ;)

post #10 of 37

I don't have a really close up picture and it is kind of hard to tell from the packaging, but this is what it looks like. The string cheese got a few grill marks and a little color. But the Cheddars and the Colby/Jack didn't take much on.

 

post #11 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by themule69 View Post
 

 I smoke my cheese till I get the color I want.

 

Happy smoken.

David

 

David, you have turned into a monster.  Proud of you and money well spent, I'm sure. LOL

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NDKoze View Post
 

I smoked some cheese recently (first try at cheese) and was trying to smoke to color. But after 5 hours in the smoke, the cheese didn't really change color at all.

 

Outside temps were in the 20-30 range.

Smoker temps ranged from 40-76 and averaged probably 55-60.

Cheeses were Mild Cheddar, Sharp Cheddar, Colby/Jack, and some mozzarella String Cheese.

 

I finally took the cheese out after 5 hours and smelled it and it did have that ash tray type smell so I think it definitely got enough smoke. But the cheese was cool to the touch with zero condensation. So, I immediately vacuum sealed it and put it into the fridge. I am cautiously optimistic that it will mellow and turn out well. But, we'll see.

 

NDKoze, keep good notes as you have already including the type of wood, the color and density of the smoke.  Different woods will produce different results.  Personal experience here will be your best teacher.

 

Allow the cheese to come to smoker temp or above, this will help eliminate condensation.  If the cheese has condensation on it, allow it to evaporate on it's own.  By wiping it off, you are removing what you just spent time putting on.

 

Hope you enjoy your cheese.

Tom

post #12 of 37
Thanks Tom!

I didn't have any condensation, and the cheese was pretty cool when I took it out of the smoker.

So, I let it rest only for an hour or so before vacuum packing. There was no wiping done because there wasn't any condensation. Was it OK to seal right away then?
post #13 of 37

Man that looks good, I'll be asking questions  I'll be a cheese smoker before long

 

Gary

post #14 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by NDKoze View Post

Thanks Tom!

I didn't have any condensation, and the cheese was pretty cool when I took it out of the smoker.

So, I let it rest only for an hour or so before vacuum packing. There was no wiping done because there wasn't any condensation. Was it OK to seal right away then?


Good job.  Normally, I let my hard cheese such as cheddar rest overnight at 70° or less, no need to refrigerate.  Softer cheese should be kept at 55° or less.  This is usually do to convenience.  It also allows for a very light crust to form, but I have also sealed it shortly out of the smoker without any consequences.

 

You may find that your cheese will mellow at a faster rate at the warmer temps.

 

Enjoy,

 

Tom

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by gary s View Post
 

Man that looks good, I'll be asking questions  I'll be a cheese smoker before long

 

Gary

 

We'll be waiting.  Let us know how it goes.

 

Have fun,

 

Tom

post #15 of 37
Thread Starter 

hard cheeses, not huge blocks but managable sizes

 

let cheese reach room temperature before smoking

 

rest overnight at about 70 F

 

If you did this, would you wax right off, or wait a few weeks then wax?

 

DS


Edited by BrewerDave - 1/22/15 at 6:53am
post #16 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrewerDave View Post
 

hard cheeses, not huge blocks but managable sizes

 

let cheese reach room temperature before smoking

 

rest overnight at about 70 F

 

If you did this, would you wax right off, or wait a few weeks then wax?

 

DS


Over time you will find what size fits your needs.  Example:  I halve a 5# block length wise then quarter each halve producing eight sticks. 

 

Yes, room temperature or your intended internal smoker temp.

 

I let mine rest on a rack inside a well ventilated two gallon zip bag.  

 

I like to wax cheese that is going to be given as gift's, or stored for more than a few months to years.

 

Tom

post #17 of 37

not to throw a snag in this but what I have found from my relocation is I can smoke cheese almost anytime but this past winter/smoke my temps were in the 20-30 degrees area and I found the smoke laid low in the smoker with very minimal/almost nothing at the top escaping so even with a longer than intended smoke and multiple rearranging of cheese the end result was less color than expected/desired. I finally pulled it all went thru my standard drill and stored. after 2-4 weeks the taste was lighter than what I prefer then 2, 3 4 etc months later it was perfect in many opinions so possible a longer rest might put it where you prefer.

 

in the mean time start more (read bank/store) cheese and you always will have it available when wanted or desired.

 

in fact swapping some cheddar and pepper jack that is 2yr old today for some Axis roasts and steaks, could be interesting first time working with Axis.

 

Great job with the cheese and happy smoking,

 

Tom

post #18 of 37
Thread Starter 

It's been a week and the smoke smell is down a little. I will try a small piece next week and get ready for my next batch. Thanks for lots of good information

post #19 of 37

Let me know, I did my first batch of smoked cheese ever, yesterday, so it's all new to me

 

Gary

post #20 of 37
Thread Starter 

These cheese is turning out pretty good. I made a second batch yesterday and am planning for a 3rd batch by the end of the month. I am liking this smoked cheese thang

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