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Difference between 5-10 degrees on a smoker

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Hi guys in relatively new to smoking. I got a bought a wsm for myself for Xmas because I love BBQ and I wanted to up my game a bit. I've been starting to get a hang of it, done a couple pork shoulders, some ribs, chicken and a sirloin tip. The last two (sirloin tip and pork shoulder) turned out awesome. I'm just curious what difference smoking at 225 would be to smoking at say 220. I see a lot of recipes are very specific to cooking temps. I have been doing most of my cooking around 250 and I've liked the results. Would it depend of the size of the cut I'm cooking? Larger roast means lower temp?
post #2 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moist View Post

Hi guys in relatively new to smoking. I got a bought a wsm for myself for Xmas because I love BBQ and I wanted to up my game a bit. I've been starting to get a hang of it, done a couple pork shoulders, some ribs, chicken and a sirloin tip. The last two (sirloin tip and pork shoulder) turned out awesome. I'm just curious what difference smoking at 225 would be to smoking at say 220. I see a lot of recipes are very specific to cooking temps. I have been doing most of my cooking around 250 and I've liked the results. Would it depend of the size of the cut I'm cooking? Larger roast means lower temp?


I smoke most of my uncured meats between 220° and 250°. There isn't much difference between 220° and 225°.

 

A lot depends on the meat & the smoker.

My smoker only goes to 275°, so that's my max for everything, including chicken, even if I wanted a higher heat to crisp the skin.

I'll use 220° sometimes to make it take longer to get more smoke on my meats.

If I injected a large roast (which I never do), I might smoke it at 275° to make sure I get it through the Danger Zone in less than 4 hours, therefore "larger roast may mean higher temp".

 

My 2 cents,

 

Bear

post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
Danger zone? Is this getting it past 140 degrees in 4 hours?
post #4 of 6

Never worry about small increments in temps or it will drive you crazy.  Just to try to stay in general ranges and it'll be all good. 

post #5 of 6

I never worry about 5-15 difference in temps. 

post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moist View Post

Danger zone? Is this getting it past 140 degrees in 4 hours?


Yes, if you inject a whole meat item, or insert a temp probe in it before it's in the smoker for a couple hours (I do 3 hours), then you have to treat it like ground meat & get it from 40° IT to 140° IT in no less more 4 hours.

 

 

Bear

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