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confused on per/lb of dry cure mix for bacon - Page 2

post #21 of 26
Well I guess that's better news, only 6% salt and 400ppm nitrite...if the nitrite is actually mixed into batch evenly. ( don't get Bear going with this one, and I have to agree)

Well you are adding 1/5 th of a tsp of cure, but you're also adding salt and sugar. My mix for 7.7 pounds would weigh out at 108 grams and only 8 g would be curing salt.
It will look like way to little to cover the slabs, but it will with some extra.
post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by seapro220 View Post
 

Hello all,

 

Here's a curious question I hope someone can answer for me.  If 1 tsp is pink salt is all that is needed for 5lb of meat, then it would stand to say that approx 1/5 tsp of pink salt is needed for 1 lb of meat.  If this is true, how to you get 1/5 tsp to thoroughly coat 1 lb of meat ??  Just curious and don't misunderstand me - I'm not trying to say that more is needed or anything like that, I'm just trying to figure out how such a little amount - which might might lightly coat a 4x4 area of a 1 lb of meat (and certainly not both sides or the whole thing).  The same can also be true as to how you can accurately cover a 5 lb of meat with only 1 tsp.

 

 

This is precisely why I Dry Cure with Tender Quick, and the only way I would ever use Cure #1 would be in a Brine like Pops uses.

 

If you figure out exactly how much cure#1, Salt, and sugar is needed for the piece you are curing, you can mix it real well & that will give you enough substance to cover the whole piece evenly.

 

 

Bear

post #23 of 26

Hi, me again. So your thoughts I'm sure, are not to much different from anybody starting out, and trying to grasp the thought process to curing meat completely and safely. I have been where you are, only a couple short months ago, and I claim no level of expertise. There are however, fellows here, like Dave for example, that have been doing this a while, and are doing it by the book. Don't be afraid to ask questions, any question, is worthy of an answer. Now, that said, when you get your answer, consider it carefully. Nobody here will steer you astray. I too asked, got answers, and then researched, read a ton, purchased books, and confirmed just how serious messing things up can be.

 

You are not naive. The amounts required, really are not a lot when you look at them in a bowl or bag, and you are correct in that they may only cover a 4x4" patch on one slab. Consider how few grains of salt it takes to season an egg, or a steak. If you took all the salt and coated one area, it may not even cover a square inch, yet the meat or egg has a nice salt balance. The nitrite/cure, salt and sugar will act in a similar fashion. They will all dissolve, and be absorbed as a liquid into the meat, and pull an amount of moisture out of the meat, you will see this in the bag. You didn't add moisture, but there it is. So as with the salt in the food you fry, the nitrate will also dissolve, and be absorbed by the meat evenly, in an amount, IF WEIGHED ACCURATELY, that will be inline with the recommended amounts accepted, and recognized by government regulatory bodies, and food professionals. If it isn't weighed, or at least mathematically measured, it WILL NOT be correct.

post #24 of 26
Thread Starter 

Hello all,

 

I pulled the bacon from the fridge the other day and washed 'everything' off and tried a piece from both slabs.  it was a little salty, but after 3 rinses - it turned out fine.  I went ahead and smoked it and have had some for the last couple of days .  Still here.

 

Next time I'll tend to be more precise in my measurements as I'm starting to enjoy all this and want to be around for quite a bit longer. 

I also found that I didn't really like the smoke flavor of the 'fruit woods' mix that I enjoyed on my whole chicken so I need to determine/find some better 'flavors' to try.  What I used was the "premium fruitwood blend" I'd purchased from green mountain.  Any suggestions from anyone for bacon smoking? Will I end up with 5 or 6 bags of different of hardwoods in the future? 

 

I'm going to try 'pops wet cure' on the next batch to see how it turn out, as soon as I locate the info - and make room in my fridge for an adequate container.

 

Next week I'm going to try some pulled pork and then some ribs in a couple of weeks.

post #25 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by seapro220 View Post

Hello all,

Some corrections need to be made after further reviewing my measurements - and I was incorrect the first time.

 Maybe I'm just being naive - but am trying to learn .. both the old methods of Charcurturie as well as newer methods of smoking/brining/curing/etc ..


Back in the old days, folks died from some curing techniques.... Today we use scales, to measure stuff accurately.... If I were you, I would skip the old ways of doing stuff..... or pay up your life insurance and hope the insurance company doesn't rule your death suicide...
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveOmak View Post


Back in the old days, folks died from some curing techniques.... Today we use scales, to measure stuff accurately.... If I were you, I would skip the old ways of doing stuff..... or pay up your life insurance and hope the insurance company doesn't rule your death suicide...

yeahthat.gif

 

 

Bear

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