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isn't the species of salmon important?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

It surprises me that folks on here aren't more specific about what kind of salmon they  are using in the discussions on here.I only have experience with farm raised Atlantic as far as smoking goes but I know there is a world of difference eating different species fresh . 

post #2 of 19

Hello.  Welcome.  I see this is your first post.  Please take some time and swing over to Roll Call and introduce yourself so that we may give you a proper "Hello".  All info you can provide us with such as smoker type, location and so on will help us answer any questions you may have, and pictures help a bunch.  As for your question: 

 

I am not a smoked fish kind of guy but my wife loves it.  Your point is well taken BUT when posting a salmon smoking "how to" the folks have to post a general salmon smoke.  I have access to farm raised Atlantic salmon, farm raised salmon from Scotland Lochs and wild Scotland salmon.  I have no access to pacific salmon.  I'll take your word for it that there is a BIG difference in what salmon you are using for "X" smoking method.  As I stated I am not a smoked fish fan but what you are asking is: has there been an extensive research smoking project done on every species of wild and farm raised salmon in the world?  I mean no disrespect, sounds like a very interesting research project.  Many members would be very interested in the results.  We have members from around the world.  If you could get Atlantic, Pacific, Australian, Scottish etc. delivered fresh from the farm and fresh from the sea I think it would be a worthy ( maybe costly ) project.  Welcome to the forum and we await your results with anticipation.  If we can help with anything please feel free to post a thread and if I can be of any assistance please feel free to shoot me a PM.  I can get you a website to have farmed raised and wild salmon from Scotland shipped to you.  Glad to have you.  Keep Smokin!

Danny

post #3 of 19
There is a world of difference in the flavor/color/texture of various species of salmon but any smoking method that works for one will work for all. They're all mild, oily fish.
post #4 of 19

Good post, I was wondering the same thing. I do a lot of the usual farm-raised atlantic Salmon, as that's what's cheap around here.  BUT, yesterday I did a wild Coho, deep, rich red color, and it was by far the best. Super soft, almost Lox-like. flavor was pretty much the same, but oh, the texture was just velvety.

 

I haven't met a fish I don't like yet!

 

Happy smokin!

post #5 of 19
I'm the same way with tunas... All of the various types are very different!
post #6 of 19

 Yes, there is no comparison between farm raised Salmon vs wild sockeye or king but if you can't get the wild fish locally, you either spend a randsome on freight to bring in the wild stuff or just work with what you can get locally.  Being able to make a pretty good dish out of some farm fish is pretty darn rewarding.  Ruining a perfect slab of king because you forgot an important brine ingredient or you smoked it too hot, too long is........well you know.

post #7 of 19

Yes, not only a big difference between species but also when and where it's caught. Take Columbia river salmon as an example. Spring run King Salmon and Fall run salmon caught in the lower Columbia can be quite different. A fish caught in the ocean will be quite different from a upriver fish. We rarely smoked Spring or ocean caught fish because the quality for eating fresh was so good. Upriver Fall fish we smoked and canned.

post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Dog View Post
 

Yes, not only a big difference between species but also when and where it's caught. Take Columbia river salmon as an example. Spring run King Salmon and Fall run salmon caught in the lower Columbia can be quite different. A fish caught in the ocean will be quite different from a upriver fish. We rarely smoked Spring or ocean caught fish because the quality for eating fresh was so good. Upriver Fall fish we smoked and canned.

 

Thanks for an interesting read.  Thumbs Up  Where I am on the east coast the fish don't change, seasonally, as best I can tell.  (Other than different specie's at different times of the year).

post #9 of 19
Yes there is a big difference in Salmon. As Red Dog mentioned not only species, but location and time of year makes a difference too. Personally I will not buy farm raised salmon. Having worked in the fishing industry most my life I just can't do it.

As far as my favorite salmon to eat I prefer Coho (silver). For smoking I prefer to smoke Chinook (king). I don't really care for Chum (pink) salmon. I also prefer my salmon from the ocean, not the river. If it is from the river it still needs to be bright if I'm not going to smoke it. If it's started to turn color it's good for smoking not grilling and if it's black it needs to stay in the river. Once again my personal preference.
post #10 of 19
Farm raised salmon is an ecological disaster! It is fed antibiotics and hormones, and the great amount of feces that is produced in a confined area kills all live in the area of the raising pens, but the salmon swim in it 24/7. Do not buy farm raised salmon!
post #11 of 19
Small point...chum is dog salmon. A fatty fishy tasting creature good for feeding sled dogs aftet you air dry the split fish. That is if you are up north and have dry arctic air...down south use a dehydrator.



http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/regulations/fishregulations/PDFs/pdfs/salmonID.pdf
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtsailor2003 View Post

Yes there is a big difference in Salmon. As Red Dog mentioned not only species, but location and time of year makes a difference too. Personally I will not buy farm raised salmon. Having worked in the fishing industry most my life I just can't do it.

As far as my favorite salmon to eat I prefer Coho (silver). For smoking I prefer to smoke Chinook (king). I don't really care for Chum (pink) salmon. I also prefer my salmon from the ocean, not the river. If it is from the river it still needs to be bright if I'm not going to smoke it. If it's started to turn color it's good for smoking not grilling and if it's black it needs to stay in the river. Once again my personal preference.


Yes Case it's hard to beat fresh silvers. We used to fish buoy 10 for silvers and a fresh silver steak with it's bright red meat on the grill was heaven! We used to catch the occasional dog salmon in Big creek and those would get pickled or smoked if they weren't too far gone. That's one thing I miss about living on the big river. It's pretty painful to pay the price for good fish these days.

post #13 of 19
I'm a little jealous of those who live in ak and get good fresh salmon. But living in n fl has a few perks also. Been waiting a half century for the gulf salmon run :). I had some chum last Summer labeled as "silverbrite". It was good grilled everyone raved about it. Who'd have thought. I get frozen pink at Walmart for @4.50 a lb. And its decent too. Of course I prefer red, silver or king. But they're 20 bucks a pound :( if you can find them. I recall reading in Michener's book " Alaska " some years back, that they graded the fish a,b,c,d & Mrs Paul's. :) owte.
Greg
Point is, about any salmon can be made tasty with the right prep.
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by brayhaven View Post

I'm a little jealous of those who live in ak and get good fresh salmon. But living in n fl has a few perks also. Been waiting a half century for the gulf salmon run :). I had some chum last Summer labeled as "silverbrite". It was good grilled everyone raved about it. Who'd have thought. I get frozen pink at Walmart for @4.50 a lb. And its decent too. Of course I prefer red, silver or king. But they're 20 bucks a pound :( if you can find them. I recall reading in Michener's book " Alaska " some years back, that they graded the fish a,b,c,d & Mrs Paul's. :) owte.
Greg
Point is, about any salmon can be made tasty with the right prep.


Only to a point.   Farm raised is farm raised.  You can't fluff it to taste like wild caught.

post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmayna View Post
 


Only to a point.   Farm raised is farm raised.  You can't fluff it to taste like wild caught.


Ah yes, but I have had wild caught that was poorly cooked and worse than well prepared farm raised. And you can also go back to the discussion on when and where it's caught. Point is, there are those that don't or are unable to catch their own, or can't afford wild caught. If that was the case with me I would eat farm raised as opposed to not eating salmon at all.

post #16 of 19
I "catch" walmart coho salmon. An interesting thing about their massively efficient distribution system is that the fish is flash frozen fresh when caught. I have been impressed. On the other side of the coin I saw chum for sale there for the first time in my life. It freaked me out. I have never seen anyone want to buy it, so it wasnt usually sold anywhere I knew about. If its not stinky then maybe I should try some, but I was kinda grossed out, having been around it when I was young in AK.
post #17 of 19
I totally agree on farm raised. If I can't get wild, I get something else. Fish, shrimp etc. fortunately I haven't had any problem finding wild. I also catch a lot of my eating fish. But
salmon are pretty scarce in the gulf 😊
Greg
post #18 of 19
post #19 of 19
I love salmon - all kinds - and raw and roe and grilled and smoked and pan seared and Norwegian farmed and wild and planked and even Alaskan WHITE salmon too.

Today however, I was going to TORCH some Norwegian farmed salmon steaks and my torch was faulty and needed to be taken back and so I finished in a pan, and that was fine, but didn't give me the crisp skin and raw middle that I had bought the torch to achieve on salmon, and on strip steak of meat, and on scallops.

Just got a new torch this afternoon however and will retry something this week. Meanwhile, here is to salmon! A delicious treat! Cheers! - Leah (the Torcheress)!



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