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Smokehouse and some understanding of building material help.

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

So I think i should build a cheap "smokehouse" for using the AMNPS that I'm getting for Xmas. I think it'll be too much of a pain in the bottom to use it to cold smoke with in my pellet grill and this would be easier to do. From browsing the smokehouse forum here, i see that treated wood is not to be used due to chemicals in it. Loooking at the B & Q website, i need some help in picking out some wood that would be safe to use. Softwood, Metaswood, carcassing, I'm having translation issues here. http://www.diy.com/departments/building-supplies/timber-woodwork/DIY763398.cat/category-27004=DIY570361?pageSize=48&categoryToFilter=DIY570361

 

I'm not planning to make a permanent structure since we rent so it'll be a wood box large enough to hang some dowel rods in for sausages and maybe some racks for salmon and cheese, etc. put the AMNPS in there with a fan or something to help keep airflow going or something.

 

Thanks in advance!

post #2 of 17


A yank here from the other side of the pond but I have the sort of smoke house you seem to be wanting. Just a plain plywood box with a separate remote source of smoke.

 

 


This is the fire pot and I have rebuilt this to a more substantial plan. As you can see a pipe leads the smoke to the base of a gas grill that serves as the footing for the box.

 


The smoker box is 5mm plywood with a light wood frame for nailing .

post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
That is pretty genius! Thanks for sharing. Can you provide the rough dimensions for the box? I'm no carpenter, been about 30 years since shop class so I will be trying for the simplest build.
post #4 of 17

Hi Mike.  Hope you are making out fine with the Wife being away.  I feel your pain Buddy.  Been over here 15 years now.  I know what I want, just don't know what it's called here.  IF you plan to use it only for cold smoking then 1/4" plywood would work fine.  B&Q also sell a packed thin tongue and groove pine which is usually used for wainscoting.  That would work well also if used as described above.  1"x2" for the framing ( that's 2"x1" here ).  MAYBE 2"x2".  I would not use either for hot smoking without a lining.  The glue in the ply and the pine tar thing.  I know sometimes I am over cautious but I have met you wonderful family.  I would not risk my family and I will certainly caution you for your families sake.  For cold smoking you will be fine.  Search "mailbox modification".  That's how I would go for using the AMNPS.  It of course it doesn't nee to be a mailbox; an old metal toolbox or an ammo can would work.  Just so long as the AMNPS fits inside.  You can find something cheap on E-Bay.  For air flow I would just drill some 1" holes around the bottom.  Then maybe a 2"-3" hole at the top for exhaust.  You can buy some pre-cut metal circles off E-Bay and just screw them on and use the as dampers for the intakes and exhaust.  The only other suggestion I have is I wouldn't make the roof flat.  I may be full of it on this one.  I know there should not be any condensation in the cold smoking but IF there is any it just seems to me you want the roof to slope so as hopefully not to let that drip back down on your meat  Just my opinions.

 

If you need any tools and or help let me know; we can plan a day/weekend to get 'er done.  Keep Smokin!

Danny

post #5 of 17


The vertical is 24 inches to the center height The front to back is about 14 inches and the side to side about 24 inches. The stick supports are made by boring holes along the center of a 3 inch wide board and then sawing through the center of the holes along the length of the board.


This is the grill without the box it works well for small batches.

post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
Ssorllih thank you! I've got a better idea now.

Danny, sloped roof sounds like a good idea. Can you take a look at that link to b&q. Which kind of wood should I ask for? I'd be okay with using boards instead of plywood just in case like you said about the glue and tar. I think I've got something in the store room I can use as the mailbox for that anmps. Thanks for the input!


Now that I think about it, I see folks from the military community getting rid of grills cheap or free when they pcs back to the states. I'll have to keep my eye out for one. Might be able to use that
post #7 of 17

Mike, Even corrugated paper shipping boxes are sometimes uses for smoking. As long as they are protected from flames the heat of cooking will be harmless.

I believe that I used untreated fir plywood for this and painted the outside with house paint.

\

post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssorllih View Post

Mike, Even corrugated paper shipping boxes are sometimes uses for smoking. As long as they are protected from flames the heat of cooking will be harmless.
I believe that I used untreated fir plywood for this and painted the outside with house paint.
\
I saw that in the jerky thread for biltong. Lightbulb and a cardboard box. :) too much rain and moisture here for cardboard unfortunately.
post #9 of 17

Hello Mike.  I had to Google that stuff.  It appears to be a laminated glued product.  So long as you are cold smoking that product and ply should be safe to use.  As for which to ask for, I'd say the cheapest option for your purpose.  The cheaper option tends to be the rough sawn pine for the framing.  I would use lue and nails rather than buying screws for this size project.  As for the sheeting you may have to do the math.  Is it cheaper to use ply or buy the T&G??  Price per square ft. of coverage.  If only cold smoking you should also get away with painting the outside to weather proof it.  This is all based on COLD SMOKING.  Just my opinions.  You have my number.  Keep Smokin!

Danny

post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
Danny, for safety, I'd prefer to build it for hot smoke, that way I don't have to worry about it. Do you think any of the softwood boards would be okay for that? My wife will be back tomorrow morning, So I can finally start putting all the cut up pork beef and chicken to use that's in the freezer hahaha.
She said she had a blueberry and maple pork breakfast sausage this morning in Dallas. It sounds intriguing so I'm going to have to make up a recipe for it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by KC5TPY View Post

Hello Mike.  I had to Google that stuff.  It appears to be a laminated glued product.  So long as you are cold smoking that product and ply should be safe to use.  As for which to ask for, I'd say the cheapest option for your purpose.  The cheaper option tends to be the rough sawn pine for the framing.  I would use lue and nails rather than buying screws for this size project.  As for the sheeting you may have to do the math.  Is it cheaper to use ply or buy the T&G??  Price per square ft. of coverage.  If only cold smoking you should also get away with painting the outside to weather proof it.  This is all based on COLD SMOKING.  Just my opinions.  You have my number.  Keep Smokin!
Danny
post #11 of 17

Hello Mike.  I stand corrected!  If ply is good enough for Pops it's good enough for me.  I remembered reading his thread so I went back to have a look.  Below is a link to his build.  I do know he added a mailbox mod to his smokehouse for using the AMNPS.  I would have said insulation and a sealed lining but he just went with the ply.  Hope she had a good trip back home.  Say "Hello" for me.  Good Luck.  Keep Smokin!

Danny

 

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/88853/found-a-burner-for-smokehouse

post #12 of 17

Hi Mike, I understand B&Q is a convenient place to shop and I use it myself on occasion but you can buy much better quality wood and a lot cheaper if you go to a timber yard. I don't know where you are in Northamptonshire, but I just Googled "Timber Merchants in Northamptonshire" and got a good selection up. A quick look at a couple showed that they had tongue and groove and shiplap cladding in a choice of woods ( yellow pine, red pine and douglas fir for example ) For a project, they would be my first port of call.

post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 
Hi jockaneezer I live about 10 miles from Peterborough. Thanks! I wouldn't have thought to Google for "timber merchant" that'll help so much!

Danny, that'll work then, thank you. I won't need one that large and I don't have the tools available that Pops has I think I can get er done :)

I've got a turkey fryer (propane burner) that isn't getting much use can you think of any reason not to use that for inside the smokehouse? I have an extra cast iron Dutch oven I can put the wood pellets in for smoking also.
post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 


This is why I need a smokehouse. I made these sundried tomato and basil chicken sausage last night and doing them on the traeger at the lowest setting is still too hot. I think that's why they get wrinkled. I did cook them to 170F internal since they are chicken. (They are cured, but I don't know if chicken is safe at a lower temperature with cure #1 added)
post #15 of 17

Hello Mike.  Sausage and things like that are exactly why I am going to do the fridge conversion.  I will be using propane in that for better temp control.  It should have been done long ago but it seems life keeps getting in the way.  The only thing I can see you might struggle with is getting the temps down with that burner.  A needle valve should help with that.  I would go with that burner until I proved it wouldn't work.  Keep Smokin!

Danny

post #16 of 17
Thread Starter 
Cool thanks Danny. I can get that burner to a pretty low temp I think, and if it doesn't work I can try the needle valve or see about getting a smaller btu one.
post #17 of 17

That would be the way I'd go about it.  Keep Smokin!

Danny

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