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Trotter and Ham Hock Terrine - Page 2

post #21 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr T 59874 View Post
 

Hi Clarissa, Another fine thread, very nice and informative.  I absolutely love head cheese terrine of which can be found in the reefer almost anytime, I think it's the pickled gel I like the most.  Your terrine has my mouth watering now and we just finished dinner. May have to bother you on this one.

 

Put the plow on the truck today as things seem to be turning white around here.  Maybe it will scare the snow away.  Other than that things are fine.

 

Enjoy your T Day and thanks for the fine thread.

 

Tom

 

Hi Tom!

 

Thank you very much for the compliments and for reading my post!  I agree that the gel is what makes it so delicious (sorry Chef Willie!).  I love head cheese too, but I find a pig's head to be a bit large and heavy to work with.  Trotters and hocks are a more manageable size for me.

 

I hope that you successfully scared the snow away, and have been able to get out for some ice fishing!  Glad to hear that you are doing well, and I hope that you have a very Happy Thanksgiving!!

 

Take care,

Clarissa

post #22 of 27
Pigalicious!!!!!!!

Looks great Clarissa!!!!



~Martin smile.gif
post #23 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiggingDogFarm View Post

Pigalicious!!!!!!!

Looks great Clarissa!!!!



~Martin smile.gif

 

Thank you, Martin!!   High praise indeed! :36:

 

Happy Thanksgiving!
Clarissa

post #24 of 27

I would love to try that, but looks too much like head cheese for the wife.  LOL

post #25 of 27

I don't know how I missed this! That looks great and I agree with using Hocks and Trotters over a head. The head is a lot more work. Your aspic is beautiful! You had me worried when you posted that you brought it to a boil and then simmered the meat. That is typically a sure fire path to cloudy aspic. The pot is typically slowly brought to about 190°F, just a few bubbles rising, and maintained at that temp. The slow heating allows more impurities to dissolve and rise and greatly limits the agitation that can break up and mix the coagulated proteins in to the broth. There are many classic recipes that call for the meats to be covered in water, brought to a hard boil then dump the whole deal, rinse the meat off and start again to make the broth for the aspic. I have done both and feel the first cleansing boil removes some flavor that I want in the dish, not down the drain.

 

You should give a Gallantine a try. They are delicious and boning the bird is the hardest part. Here is one I made to win a Throwdown a couple of years ago...JJ

 

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/116456/smoked-chicken-galantine-with-country-pate

 

051.JPG

post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef JimmyJ View Post

 

You should give a Gallantine a try. They are delicious and boning the bird is the hardest part. Here is one I made to win a Throwdown a couple of years ago...JJ

 

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/116456/smoked-chicken-galantine-with-country-pate

 

051.JPG

 

 Really a beautiful presentation, and no doubt tastes as good as it looks.

post #27 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef JimmyJ View Post
 

I don't know how I missed this! That looks great and I agree with using Hocks and Trotters over a head. The head is a lot more work. Your aspic is beautiful! You had me worried when you posted that you brought it to a boil and then simmered the meat. That is typically a sure fire path to cloudy aspic. The pot is typically slowly brought to about 190°F, just a few bubbles rising, and maintained at that temp. The slow heating allows more impurities to dissolve and rise and greatly limits the agitation that can break up and mix the coagulated proteins in to the broth. There are many classic recipes that call for the meats to be covered in water, brought to a hard boil then dump the whole deal, rinse the meat off and start again to make the broth for the aspic. I have done both and feel the first cleansing boil removes some flavor that I want in the dish, not down the drain.

 

You should give a Gallantine a try. They are delicious and boning the bird is the hardest part. Here is one I made to win a Throwdown a couple of years ago...JJ

 

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/116456/smoked-chicken-galantine-with-country-pate

 

051.JPG

 

 

 

Hi Chef JJ!

 

I'm so glad to see you drop by!  I really appreciate your advice on the slow heat + 190 deg F simmer.  I always drop off the boil promptly, but I didn't realize that rate of heating also played a factor in cloudy stock or aspic.  I'll try the slower heating rate that you suggest next time, and also resist the urge to take it to a boil.

 

Wow, your galantine is just beautiful!  I can see why you won the throwdown with this.  What a great father-daughter project.  

 

Making a galantine is one of those "holy grail" cooking projects for me.  Someday I'd love to be able to take the garde manger component of a culinary program. I went back and looked at the post you linked, and also viewed the Pepin galantine video that you suggested.  LOL.  He makes it look so easy!  I'll need to buy a few chickens and try out the technique….they can always be turned into chicken sausage, I guess!  

 

Thanks very much for posting and your advice on cooking techniques!  

 

Have a great Friday and weekend,

Clarissa

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