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lang smoker

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

i bought a lang smoker about 6 months, a 36inch patio reverse flow. it seems that i am having a problem getting good smoke flavor in my food. i have tried sugar maple, hickory, red and white oak,peach,apple woods thinking that the wood was my problem. please help.

post #2 of 14

Are you burning wood for fuel, or using charcoal with flavoring wood added? If you can't get it worked out, let me know and I'll come haul it off for you.38.gif

post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 

I AM USING NO CHARCOAL, ONLY USING THE WOOD FOR FUEL AND TRING TO GET SMOKE FLAVOR FROM IT. THIS IS MY FIFTH SMOKER THAT I HAVE OWNED, BUT THE HARDEST ONE TO GET GOOD SMOKE FLOVER FROM.

post #4 of 14

If you are using those woods and you are properly using the smoker a lack of smoke taste is very unusual.

 

What does the smoke ring look like?  Describe the smoke leaving your chimney. 

 

Before I joined this forum I thought a thick white smoke and the resulting intense, dramatic smoke flavor was the goal.  I learned that what I mistook for good smoke flavor was the overpowering, acrid flavor of improperly burned wood.  

 

I learned and my taste buds became educated to what good smoked meat tastes like.

 

Remember with a well built smoker like your Lang a normal, pork butt smoke can take up to 15 hours, packer briskets can take almost as long.  We normally smoke these meats a lower temperatures (225 - 270) degrees with thin, blue smoke leaving the exhaust.

 

How long are your smokes lasting?   What temps are you using?

 

Good luck, with a bit more information we may be able to help.

post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 

my smoke ring is usually deep 1/2 inch or so,there is only blue smoke coming from my chimney just a little not very much, it seems that my temperature my be my problem, because my smoker temp runs up to 300 degrees sometimes, and i have a hard time getting it to come down.but i usually try to keep my temp at 275-300 degrees. i have to add a piece of wood about every 40 minutes. and the the smoke last about 20-25 of those, before the wood turns to embers. i like to cook with just embers but sometimes to me thats hard to control the temp.usually my food is done way before the hours that you say. maybe i need to just lower my internal temps, just to see what happens.

post #6 of 14
Take pictures of the FB door and air inlets.... and the stack.... and the opening between the FB and CC....
post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 

i do not have a clue what you are talking about,:sausage:

post #8 of 14
FB... Firebox..... CC....CookChamber
post #9 of 14

Let me know if you need me to come haul that thing off!

post #10 of 14

Sounds like its leaking around the firebox door.....

post #11 of 14

Dannylang

 

I have a Lang 36.  I've started using smaller splits and just feeding the smoker a bit more often then they do with the big smokers.  All the woods you mentioned are fairly subtle except for the hickory.  If you are looking for knock your socks of smoke flavor try a bit of mesquite.   I've never had a problem with flavor but I burn nothing but pecan and maybe a bit of oak.  You shouldn't have a problem maintaining temps.

 

I start a big fire, get the smoker to 300 degrees, spray the smoke chamber down with the hose, close the lid and let it steam to clean it and the grates.   I'll open it back up, brush down the grates, spray and let steam again.  I let the smoker get back to 300 and load the food.  My temps will work down to smoking range and I can generally keep them steady if I feed a constant supply of small splits.   Maybe as big around as a beer can and 12 - 16 inches long.  It's not a set and forget smoker, if you want constant temps you have to find the sweet spot between fuel and dampers.

 

Don't forget, leave the exhaust open at 3/4 to full.  Use the air inlet dampers to control your temps.  Close them to lower the temp and open to raise the temps.   make sure you have no open cracks or seams around your firebox door.  The dampers should be the only source of air.

 

I know Lang made some 36s with lighter weight stainless steal.  I asked him to make mine out of the heavy steal so the temps hold a bit better.

 

I really like my 36 but if you do it right your checking/adjusting fuel burn every 20 minutes or so.

 

Good Luck

post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 

my lang smoker is almost brand hew so there no cracks in the firebox, i can keep a stead enough smoke, and i do put bigger pieces of wood than what you say,i do not want a heavy smoke flavor. But i think it should be a little more than what i have. thanks for all the input fellows.

post #13 of 14

I have a friend interested in a Lang so I searched on them and found this thread.  The thing that looks wrong with the 36" model is the chimney coming off the roof of the meat box.  Even with reverse flow, I suspect the smoke/heat goes to the top of the meat chamber and out the exit without touching the meat. So a bigger fire is required.  A better solution would be a chimney coming off the side at the level of the meat so that heat/smoke flows through the meat before exiting.  Would like to know if Lang users think this is not a problem.

post #14 of 14
no Its problem at all.
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