or Connect
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Smoking Supplies & Equipment › Electric Smokers › Cleaning inside of Masterbuilt smoker? Do or Don't?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Cleaning inside of Masterbuilt smoker? Do or Don't? - Page 4

post #61 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by daRicksta View Post
 


Great job on the smoke rings, Kurt. But let's pretend I know nothing about a brisket vacuumed sealed and stored in a freezer for almost 3 years causing a Myoglobin failure.OK, I don't anything about a brisket vacuumed sealed and stored in a freezer for almost 3 years causing a Myoglobin failure. Is this a real thing or is it an educated guess on your part? I'm really curious but I'm still not ready to grab the smoke ring in my MES carousel.


When you gave me the link to the site on how a smoke ring is formed I mentioned Pop's article on the changing color of meat.  I don't know if you bookmarked it or not.  When beef is processed the blood is drained and the side of beef is purple due to the lack of oxygen (deoxymyoglobin.)  When it's cut into roasts/steak and exposed to air it blooms cherry red we see in the butcher's case (oxymyoglobin.)  Over exposure to air over time oxidizes the meat and it turns brown because myoglobin binds oxygen to iron in the muscle (metmyoglobin.)  You can vacuum seal meat at different stages within a couple of weeks and the color changes back and forth because the myoglobin can still transfer oxygen.  Over time myoglobin looses it's ability to transfer oxygen.  So the brisket being in the freezer for nearly three years was permanently grey not from freezer burn but from severely aged/expired myoglobin. Putting two briquettes in the chip tray doesn't leave a mark or residue.  Just clean ash.  It's the easiest thing to clean because you just dump it out.

-Kurt     

post #62 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearcarver View Post


LOL---Tell me about it !!

It was windy during the last smoke before My Smoking Porch got upgraded.
The wind was sucking the heat out of my top vent. 
I didn't have time to do anything fancy to block the wind.
Then I realized I had my oldest of all my Vietnam Vet hats on, with the whole back half of the hat being a nylon mesh.
So I put the old hat right over the top vent, which allowed the smoke to get through the mesh, but the hat was blocking the wind so it couldn't suck anything through the vent.

My hat was on that vent for about 2 hours, and it smells Wonderful
Mrs Bear says I gotta leave that hat in the garage, but I can sniff it anytime I want to.wife.gif


Bear
I gotta get me a hat that smells like that!
post #63 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ndwildbill View Post


I gotta get me a hat that smells like that!


LOL---They're real easy to make.

 

I would bet you could sell them for a profit in the right circles.

 

 

Bear

post #64 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr K View Post
 

I'm no doctor! I just operate on food to make it taste great.  :banana_smiley:  nana2.gif  :banana_smiley:Butcher's twine=sutures, cutlery= scalpels, brine/cure=saline drip, syringe to administer flavorful meds.  What illness did cured ham have?  I don't know but I'm sure SMF helped to cure it.  The doctor is in!

-Kurt  


Kurt, I'll take your doctoring any day. Except of course if I need a real doctor. But then you could cater my surgery recovery and after they have me up on my feet again I could assist!sawzall.gifcheers.gif:grilling_smilie:fire.gif:help:

post #65 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr K View Post
 

Periodically I hand the AMNPS/AMNTS to my girlfriend and say, "doesn't that smell great?"  Ironically, she agrees.  I got a keeper!

-Keeper

Maybe here's the difference between a wife and a girlfriend. When I get into bed at night after a day of cooking with my MES, my wife says, "You smell like smoke." I ask, "Is that good?" That's when she starts humming "On top of old smoky..."

 

Yes, smoke-loving women are keepers.

post #66 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr K View Post
 


When you gave me the link to the site on how a smoke ring is formed I mentioned Pop's article on the changing color of meat.  I don't know if you bookmarked it or not.  When beef is processed the blood is drained and the side of beef is purple due to the lack of oxygen (deoxymyoglobin.)  When it's cut into roasts/steak and exposed to air it blooms cherry red we see in the butcher's case (oxymyoglobin.)  Over exposure to air over time oxidizes the meat and it turns brown because myoglobin binds oxygen to iron in the muscle (metmyoglobin.)  You can vacuum seal meat at different stages within a couple of weeks and the color changes back and forth because the myoglobin can still transfer oxygen.  Over time myoglobin looses it's ability to transfer oxygen.  So the brisket being in the freezer for nearly three years was permanently grey not from freezer burn but from severely aged/expired myoglobin. Putting two briquettes in the chip tray doesn't leave a mark or residue.  Just clean ash.  It's the easiest thing to clean because you just dump it out.

-Kurt     


You should really consider enrolling in pre-med; you're very good. But besides that, I did bookmark the page but I've really only skimmed through it every time. When there's a page with a lot of text I scan through it looking for information that answers whatever question I have at the moment. I skip over parts that go into how myglobin changes in meat because it may be interesting but it's not info I feel I need. What I do find interesting is that you said "When beef is processed the blood is drained and the side of beef is purple due to the lack of oxygen (deoxymyoglobin.)" But when beef is way undercooked so that it's raw, the color you see is purple. I see and hear that often on cooking competition shows. Also, what gives beef in supermarket meat shelves its bright red color isn't exposure to air. It's exposure to carbon monoxide. Yes, fresh meat is naturally red but it stays unnaturally red longer from the CO. As the meat ages and the gassed meat oxidizes you see it turn to brown and then gray if it ages too much. And we're talking sliced meat here, not whole quarters hung or placed in meat lockers to dry or wet age.

post #67 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by daRicksta View Post
 

Maybe here's the difference between a wife and a girlfriend. When I get into bed at night after a day of cooking with my MES, my wife says, "You smell like smoke." I ask, "Is that good?" That's when she starts humming "On top of old smoky..."

 

Yes, smoke-loving women are keepers.

Thumbs Up  th_roflmao.gif

 

 

Bear

post #68 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by daRicksta View Post
 

Maybe here's the difference between a wife and a girlfriend. When I get into bed at night after a day of cooking with my MES, my wife says, "You smell like smoke." I ask, "Is that good?" That's when she starts humming "On top of old smoky..."

 

Yes, smoke-loving women are keepers.

:banana_smiley:

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Electric Smokers
SmokingMeatForums.com › Forums › Smoking Supplies & Equipment › Electric Smokers › Cleaning inside of Masterbuilt smoker? Do or Don't?