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MES30 and too much smoke from AMPS - Page 3

post #41 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearcarver View Post
 

Ricksta,

To answer a couple of your questions:

 

If that instructor really said Pellicle clocks smoke, he should go back to school. Pellicle doesn't block smoke---It helps smoke to adhere. I get it either by putting it in front of fans, or putting it in the fridge overnight, uncovered, and then put it in the smoker without smoke, @ low heat for an hour or so.

 

I see no problem with letting a steak set out, but I personally don't because I want the outside charred, and the inside pink (Med--Rare). Letting it sit out helps get the inside to cook more. Some people even partially freeze their steaks to get this effect.

 

I wouldn't let any large low & slow non-cured item sit out for any amount of time, & I wouldn't let ground meat sit out either.

 

Hope this helps,

Bear


As I wrote in another response, there were a few things he said I inwardly questioned or disagreed with. But the guys got like 6 schools (units in industrial parks) scattered around 3-4 states and earns a nice living off it. He and his paid instructors all use his no smoke absorption after 3 hours guideline. But you know? He talked about competing against Myron Mixon and beating him once--once--so maybe that says something about his BBQ skill level and knowledge.

 

As I wrote to Foamheart, I read somewhere that sticking cold meat on a grill can prevent the meat fibers from fully breaking down so they may not come out as tender as if you'd let them sit out for a bit before cooking. I can find those references if you like. I'm still at the point where I've learned a lot but there's a lot I haven't personally learned so al I can go by is what I read until I learn it by doing. but I admit, getting that charred outside/med rare inside for steaks has been hard for me to get on my charcoal grill. I just bought a thermocoupler instant read therm so I can more easily track the IT.

 

Fully agree about the large cuts to be used for smoking and slow cooking in general. We take them out, season them right away, brown the outsides if the recipe calls for it, and then we stick it in whatever slow cooker appliance we're using. I do let ground beef sit out for the reason I wrote above grilling cold meat. My wife is fond of telling me how her mother broke most food safety rules--letting mayo or cooked deviled eggs sit out for hours, etc.,--in her kitchen when my wife was growing up because the rules hadn't been written yet. Almost no cases of food poisoning in their house and nobody died. I think what saved them was the fact the whole family came primarily from strong Irish/German stock.

post #42 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by daRicksta View Post
 


The wife and I both let leftover cooked food cool down to the temp where it's safe to put it in storage containers and place in the fridge.

 

Me too, actually I let mine cool and redistribute before eating. Its much better tasting without the burnt tongue. Also when freezing I always wait now to bag and tag because I want all the condensate out.

 

II would like to see this guys creditials, Methinks he needs a re-certification.

 

Well it is back to the kitchen .... jambalaya for supper and coconut cream meringue pie for desert!

post #43 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by WaywardSwede View Post
 

 

Oh, man, don't do this.  I brine poultry all the time, but always keep the temperature between 36° and 40° F.  Theoretically he may be right, but there is no way I would try this myself, or recommend to anyone else to try it.  Eating a medium-rare steak is one thing, eating a turkey that's been stewing in room temperature salt water for 2 days is a whole new level of crazy. 


You've really got me laughing now. It's clear to me from the responses here the guy was wrong about the limited time for smoke absorption and now this. It sounded plausible at the time but in retrospect  if he was right you'd see this in every turkey brining article, which you don't.

 

He also claimed you could take cheap vodka or tequila and pour it through a Brita filter or something 2-3 times and you'd wind up with a taste and smoothness identical to the expensive stuff. I think that there's a bit more involved in high end hard liquor producing than just filtering.

post #44 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamheart View Post
 

 

Me too, actually I let mine cool and redistribute before eating. Its much better tasting without the burnt tongue. Also when freezing I always wait now to bag and tag because I want all the condensate out.

 

II would like to see this guys creditials, Methinks he needs a re-certification.

 

Well it is back to the kitchen .... jambalaya for supper and coconut cream meringue pie for desert!

Here ya go, Foamheart.

 

 

"Stu McMullen

Head Honcho

While most people were starting a family and raising kids Stu spent his weekends traveling around the country visiting the different BBQ and Grilling contests that take place in such cities as St. Louis, Memphis, New Orleans, and Greenwood SC. Not satisfied with just being part of the crowd, he would actually meet up with different BBQ teams from around the country and go to work in their booth learning some of their secrets and getting lots dish washing practice.

To help expand his knowledge of the BBQ and Grilling world Stu also spend time traveling to different countries to learn what they do to make the BBQ and Grilling experience a good one. In addition to his participation around the country at some of the more famous BBQ and Grilling cook off sites Stu has also taken many classes from the different cooking schools including our own Western Culinary Institute. With years of practice and lots of knowledge Stu is the perfect one to help you learn how to master your BBQ or Grill.

As a frequent traveler to Asia don’t let him get away without showing you some of the ways to bring the wonderful BBQ flavor of Asia home to the northwest and just watch out … as you may not wish to get him started on his experience at the different chili cook offs. He does have few recipes for great chili."

 

 

Now, back to my comments. I think he said he's been teaching versions of this class for 20-30 years, I think from the late 80s. He claimed to have beaten Myron Mixon in one category in one competition but was beaten the other 2-3 times he competed against Mixon. The first 20 mins. or so of his class was his lecturing on how to make cheap tequila and vodka taste like the high end stuff by running it through a Brita filter about 3 times. I thought that it was odd to spend so much of the first hour on that; I also didn't believe him. What I took away from the class was a fun time, taking part in or witnessing cooking with a BGE, a Traeger, the Char-Broil Big Easy, and I learned some new techniques and recipes. There was some actual legitimate knowledge imparted there.

 

If we're not going to eat cooked meats for awhile, I let them cool and then vacuum seal the leftovers--love my Food Saver!--before freezing them.

 

I'd love to see pics of your kitchen because anyone who can whip out jambalaya and coconut cream meringue pie for the same meal is a home cook to admire. I've done a simplified slow cooker jambalaya but if I could cook an authentic version only my son might both eat and enjoy it. The wife doesn't like most seafood (especially shellfish and crustaceans) and she prefers her sausage mild, not hot.

 

post #45 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by daRicksta View Post

 

He also claimed you could take cheap vodka or tequila and pour it through a Brita filter or something 2-3 times and you'd wind up with a taste and smoothness identical to the expensive stuff. I think that there's a bit more involved in high end hard liquor producing than just filtering.

 

You mean there is a digfference between the good and the cheap vodka? people actually would say, "Wow thats the good vodka"? I love the vodka comercial where the girl says, " but this vodka was made from potatoes that look like famous people's heads" or "this one is filtered thru rare meotorites fallen from the heavens" so its poured over rocks. LOL Sorry I am sure someone will take offense and talk about their Grey Goose.  I just don't know a single person who sits down and sips vodka on the rocks.

 

They used to run Gilley torpedo juice thru bread before the Navy changed to Pink Lady because the electrican's couldn't take it. They couldn't hold there Gilley. Or Aqua Vella. LOL 

 

Making happy juice taste good is very hard.

 

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/143459/uncle-goldies-fruit-liqueur

 

I am going to get off the man;s case, it maybe he knew what he was talking about. I normally don't doubt abothers word, although I am a firm believer in what Ben Franklin said about believe nothing you hera and only half that you see.

post #46 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamheart View Post
 

 

You mean there is a digfference between the good and the cheap vodka? people actually would say, "Wow thats the good vodka"? I love the vodka comercial where the girl says, " but this vodka was made from potatoes that look like famous people's heads" or "this one is filtered thru rare meotorites fallen from the heavens" so its poured over rocks. LOL Sorry I am sure someone will take offense and talk about their Grey Goose.  I just don't know a single person who sits down and sips vodka on the rocks.

 

They used to run Gilley torpedo juice thru bread before the Navy changed to Pink Lady because the electrican's couldn't take it. They couldn't hold there Gilley. Or Aqua Vella. LOL 

 

Making happy juice taste good is very hard.

 

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/143459/uncle-goldies-fruit-liqueur

 

I am going to get off the man;s case, it maybe he knew what he was talking about. I normally don't doubt abothers word, although I am a firm believer in what Ben Franklin said about believe nothing you hera and only half that you see.


I know Grey Goose (have never tried it since I'm not a vodka guy) but not Gilley torpedo juice or Pink Lady or Aqua Vella, not having been in any of the Armed Services. I should Google all three but I'm about to go offline. The text of your response was sent to my Hotmail. I forwarded it to my home email just for the link to your thread where you show how to make those fruit liqueurs just for future reference. If it's hard to make it taste good well, I have enough to do to make my food taste good. The wife and I cook just about every meal we serve from scratch--that's breakfast and dinner--just about 7 days a week. We make up our weekly menus in advance by choosing which recipes to cook and who will cook them (unless we team prep) and then food shop accordingly.

 

If you had met the guy, Foamheart, you'd have seen he's got a squashproof case. I think he's been making a living from the classes too long to be bothered by critics or if he's giving out bad info. I've put the guy in perspective. His knowledge base is faulty but I still got some good stuff from the class and it was tons of fun being surrounded by about 40 other guys and gals who loved BBQing and grilling just like I do. Yeah, he didn't get everything right but that's what these forums are for, to share real life experience, advice, and opinions.

 

Part of the benefit I derived from the class was seeing a Big Green Egg in action because I don't know anyone near me who owns one and I sure won't ever be buying one because of the expense and because it wouldn't fit into my style of BBQ and grilling. I've seen Traeger's on display at Costco and heard a bit of a salesguy's spiel, but I got to cook on one and check it out which confirmed I don't want one of those, either. I'm perfectly content with my Weber kettle charcoal grill and my MES.

post #47 of 47

I have one setup like you mentioned and I drilled a 3" dia hole in the top at the left, back corner. 3" 90 degree elbow turned straight(7-8" high ).  I added a few 1/2" dia. holes underneath the chip tray/pellet tray area.

I found that the lack of ventilation(in and out) left too much moisture in the smoke, making the bitter//acidic taste, specially on lower temp smokes.

 

I also put a metal tray under the pellet tray to keep away excessive heat from the element.  If not, the pellets will burn too fast and not burn completely, leaving tiny black charcoal pellets.

 

Welcome to the learning curve...

 

-Brian

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