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BABYBACKS! My first big post. - Page 2

post #21 of 28

That is a good size

post #22 of 28
Hi Wade, yes it's 94 inches long x 24 inches in diameter.

I know you are more or a purist smoker, but what do you think of the idea running it on propane? Looking to build a RF Smoker, but with two burners running 3/4 of the RF Plate.

A smoke box at one end. Now this is where ideas different. I was thinking of a burner under a Steel plate that wood chip/pellets/wood chunks could be loaded onto and this would generate the smoke. Been told that this would not be suitable for smoking as the temperature would be to high? Can not see this as the burner would not be that big, something like a burner from a small BBQ.

Also be told that the smoke passing over the RF Burners would some how destroy the smoke? This would not be a problem as I can fit a steel box section running from the wood box under the RF Plate, then 90' bend at the end so it's just above RF plate! then the heat convection from the burners would take the smoke across the grilling area to the Chimney Stack?

Would be great flu for any feed back

Smokin Monkey
post #23 of 28

Looking good there, looks like you've got the hang of it. For increased capacity, here's something I tried last weekend when I needed to smoke 3 racks of ribs at the weekend as I had a few people coming over. I usually do 2 racks cut in half to try different rubs and I've used a toast rack or similar to keep them vertical. 6 x 1/2 racks was too much for that so I got the rack out of an ikea roasting tray and did two flat layers. It worked pretty well, I swapped them top to bottom half way through but it gave me more space in my 22" kettle.

 

This is the type of rack; it has good stable feet:

 

After I got the hang of ribs I tried pork shoulder. I don't have a lot of good butchers nearby so I was using Lidl boneless shoulder roasts, last weekend I used some Sainsbury's ones that were fine. I take the elastic net off, remove the skin, add rub, and put the net back on as they are a ragged lump. I've used 3-4lb chunks but next I'll try one of the 6-7lb ones I think. There's plenty of info on here about pork shoulders, just cook to an internal temp, not time. Another good thing to try is chicken, either spatchcocked or vertical - it stays really moist either way.

post #24 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by some bloke View Post

Looking good there, looks like you've got the hang of it. For increased capacity, here's something I tried last weekend when I needed to smoke 3 racks of ribs at the weekend as I had a few people coming over. I usually do 2 racks cut in half to try different rubs and I've used a toast rack or similar to keep them vertical. 6 x 1/2 racks was too much for that so I got the rack out of an ikea roasting tray and did two flat layers. It worked pretty well, I swapped them top to bottom half way through but it gave me more space in my 22" kettle.

This is the type of rack; it has good stable feet:



After I got the hang of ribs I tried pork shoulder. I don't have a lot of good butchers nearby so I was using Lidl boneless shoulder roasts, last weekend I used some Sainsbury's ones that were fine. I take the elastic net off, remove the skin, add rub, and put the net back on as they are a ragged lump. I've used 3-4lb chunks but next I'll try one of the 6-7lb ones I think. There's plenty of info on here about pork shoulders, just cook to an internal temp, not time. Another good thing to try is chicken, either spatchcocked or vertical - it stays really moist either way.
Thankyou very much buddy. That's a great help. I was thinking if using a toast rack but I will give that tray a go as Iv got an ikea near my work yard.
I'm going to pluck up the courage and smoke a pork shoulder this Sunday. How long would you say a 4/5 lb shoulder would take to smoke mate?
Thanks again rob.
post #25 of 28

I think you allow about 1.5hrs/lb, so probably 6-7hrs for a 4-5lb chunk. I got a probe thermometer to check internal temps, to pull apart you have to be over 96c/205f internal, I think. I like my pork sliced so as long as I'm over 190 I am happy. Pork shoulder is fairly forgiving of smoker temp fluctuations from what I gather, I find my kettle will vary between 120-150c but the meat is still great, your smoker should sit at a more constant temp. Last weekend i put 3 x 3-4lb pieces on for about 4 hrs, then put them in the oven at 110c for about 4 hrs while the ribs cooked. One reason I did this was for space for the ribs, another was to avoid blackening the meat. It had a nice colour and good bark so I was happy with that. HAd some good feedback as well.

Pic:

 

 

No pic of the ribs, I was busy and everybody swooped on them.

 

If you don't want to try a long smoke (but really, you should...) I have cut shoulders into fist sized chunks and had them done in about 4 hours.

post #26 of 28

Another way to maximise the cooking area for ribs is to stack them as you cook them. Weber actually show this method on their "Thrill of the Grill" course and it works quite well. There is a link here to show you the principle using whole racks however the Weber method involves cutting the racks in half and making more shorter stacks.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wvk1dARtj8E

 

This method works better if you are cooking the ribs a little hotter than 225F/110C but the end results are very acceptable.

post #27 of 28

I've seen that way in a weber cook book, I think. Maybe I just need a bigger smoker...

 

 

post #28 of 28

Hello Folks.  Loads of great ideas and techniques.  Some really good lookin food.  Keep Smokin!

Danny

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