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First brisket overnight w/ Q-view. - Page 2

post #21 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by brandon91 View Post
 

 

I waited until the probe inserted into the point end with no resistance.

Yup just like the toothpick method......Thumbs Up

post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by hillbillyrkstr View Post

I was just wondering cause I plan on trying a brisket again soon. Any suggestions on which one to use? I'm not sure I want to try a top dollar brisket considering I'm 0-2 on them this far

 

Choice is my go-to grade of beef.  Experiment on a smaller brisket, like 4-7 lbs when they are on sale.  Will most likely be just the flat and already trimmed.  I noticed Saturday my grocer had a 4.5 lb brisket, choice grade, in cryovac for $5.99/lb.  I do a brisket about every 6 weeks and just did one 2-3 weeks ago .  I love brisket but don't want to burn out on it.  I've yet to have a bad one by rubbing with EVOO/SPOG, smoking low n slow until 150F IT or first stall, wrapping with about a half cup of beef broth, then cranking the chamber temp up to 275F.  Pull off the smoker at 200F IT then wrap the still wrapped brisket in old towels for an hour or two.  You need to get a moist, flavorful one under your belt.  You can worry about bark later.

post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noboundaries View Post

Each of the grades has several levels of marbling, with Wagyu having the most.

Wagyu is not a USDA grade, it is another species of cow like black angus or Holstein. Wagyu cows are the species that produce Kobe beef from Japan and they are now raised in the US and other places. The meat does have more fat, but the fat is also significantly different with a much lower melting temp than typical beef fat. I would strongly recommend NOT smoking a Wagyu brisket because the cook times and temperatures will be very different than a normal brisket and it will be pricey experimentation. We tried one and won't be trying another any time soon.

Brisket is not a tender piece of marbled meat like a good steak. That is why it needs to be slow cooked (smoked, braised, boiled etc.) and not grilled. Don't get hung up on the grades as much as the individual cut. You want a whole brisket with the flat and the tip and a good layer of fat. Some people prefer the smaller ones as they MAY trend toward being a little softer. I am sure there are threads on here that offer more detail on selecting a brisket, but often times you are limited by what you can find locally.

The biggest tip I can give you is up the smoker temp and get it done faster. 14+ hours is too long, 12 is ok, 10 is better. For a 14-15 LB brisket, that means over 250 in most smokers, your equipment (and weather?) may vary. You will hit a stall which is where the meat is getting tender, be patient and let it do its thing. Other than that, there are tons of recipes and techniques that have all worked for someone.

Good luck and don't give up!
post #24 of 28

I would say that is great for the first try! Nice job Brandon!

post #25 of 28
Thanks for all the info y'all. I'm gonna try one again here soon.
post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by m-fine View Post


Wagyu is not a USDA grade, it is another species of cow like black angus or Holstein. Wagyu cows are the species that produce Kobe beef from Japan and they are now raised in the US and other places. The meat does have more fat, but the fat is also significantly different with a much lower melting temp than typical beef fat. I would strongly recommend NOT smoking a Wagyu brisket because the cook times and temperatures will be very different than a normal brisket and it will be pricey experimentation. We tried one and won't be trying another any time soon.

Brisket is not a tender piece of marbled meat like a good steak. That is why it needs to be slow cooked (smoked, braised, boiled etc.) and not grilled. Don't get hung up on the grades as much as the individual cut. You want a whole brisket with the flat and the tip and a good layer of fat. Some people prefer the smaller ones as they MAY trend toward being a little softer. I am sure there are threads on here that offer more detail on selecting a brisket, but often times you are limited by what you can find locally.

The biggest tip I can give you is up the smoker temp and get it done faster. 14+ hours is too long, 12 is ok, 10 is better. For a 14-15 LB brisket, that means over 250 in most smokers, your equipment (and weather?) may vary. You will hit a stall which is where the meat is getting tender, be patient and let it do its thing. Other than that, there are tons of recipes and techniques that have all worked for someone.

Good luck and don't give up!

 

Yep, all good info.  Didn't mean to throw Wagyu in with the USDA grades, but thought it might come up.

post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by m-fine View Post

Wagyu is not a USDA grade, it is another species of cow like black angus or Holstein. Wagyu cows are the species that produce Kobe beef from Japan and they are now raised in the US and other places. The meat does have more fat, but the fat is also significantly different with a much lower melting temp than typical beef fat. I would strongly recommend NOT smoking a Wagyu brisket because the cook times and temperatures will be very different than a normal brisket and it will be pricey experimentation. We tried one and won't be trying another any time soon.

Brisket is not a tender piece of marbled meat like a good steak. That is why it needs to be slow cooked (smoked, braised, boiled etc.) and not grilled. Don't get hung up on the grades as much as the individual cut. You want a whole brisket with the flat and the tip and a good layer of fat. Some people prefer the smaller ones as they MAY trend toward being a little softer. I am sure there are threads on here that offer more detail on selecting a brisket, but often times you are limited by what you can find locally.

The biggest tip I can give you is up the smoker temp and get it done faster. 14+ hours is too long, 12 is ok, 10 is better. For a 14-15 LB brisket, that means over 250 in most smokers, your equipment (and weather?) may vary. You will hit a stall which is where the meat is getting tender, be patient and let it do its thing. Other than that, there are tons of recipes and techniques that have all worked for someone.

Good luck and don't give up!

great information
post #28 of 28
Thread Starter 
Lots of good information here guys thanks, I'll try again here soon biggrin.gif
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