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Ring bologna temp

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Have a question for those who know so much more than me. I made some ring bologna over the week end (1/2 pork, 1/2 beef). I used the seasoning and cure #1 per the kit I bought direction's. I didn't get a chance to smoke it Monday like I hoped so had to last night. I put it in the smoker at about 140 degrees for 30-45 minutes to start to dry. Then added smoke and bumped up heat to 175-180.

At about 9pm the IT of the bologna was about 145, but at a little after 10 when I had to pull it so I could get to bed, IT was between 148-150 (checked a couple different rings). So they were at 145+ IT for at least an hour, and got to 150ish. My question is would these be safe to eat cold? Or would it be better to freeze them tonight and then hot cook them when I wanted to eat them. I know I've read here about some guidelines of minimum IT of X, but if at Y for a certain amount of time it is good too. Didn't know how cure #1 would play into that as well.
post #2 of 11

I can't answer the question about any length of time at a lower internal temp making it safe to eat, but I can say I never pull any of my TQ cured sausage until it hits a minimum of 152* IT. This makes them safe to eat without further cooking.

 

 

Bear

post #3 of 11

I would place them is a 180 degree bath and bring them to a safe temp (160 degrees)  before eating them cold or slice, then grill to a safe temp.

 

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/wcm/connect/3e6befc0-b62e-4168-bf4b-b3a386e3fe19/Sausage_and_Food_Safety.pdf?MOD=AJPERES

 

 

 

Adding cure allows you to cook sausage at lower temps. The sausage still has to reach a safe temp

post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by boykjo View Post
 

I would place them is a 180 degree bath and bring them to a safe temp (160 degrees)  before eating them cold or slice, then grill to a safe temp.

 

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/wcm/connect/3e6befc0-b62e-4168-bf4b-b3a386e3fe19/Sausage_and_Food_Safety.pdf?MOD=AJPERES

 

 

 

Adding cure allows you to cook sausage at lower temps. The sausage still has to reach a safe temp

 

Yup---I preached the USDA's 160* for years, and I got into a debate about it at another place, just last week, where a guy said 140* was safe. LOL

 

I did end up changing to 152* as an absolute minimum, because All of the major meat smoking books say 152*, including "Great Sausage Recipes and Meat Curing", by Rytek Kutas.

 

Bear

post #5 of 11

I use 154 as a minimum as I smoke to 160 to be sure all of my sausage has reached 154. As per Jeff we will follow the usda.regs

 

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/86649/the-final-word-on-food-safety

 

The usda doesnt mention ground meat that has cure. All it does say is ground beef, pork, lamb or veal so If its ground it has to go to 160. The usda have now said that all jerky has to be cooked to 160 before being dried because bactiria will survive....

 

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/meat-preparation/jerky-and-food-safety/ct_index

post #6 of 11

OK---Jeff's the Boss! I can do 160* or better on this forum. Thumbs Up

 

That's easy for me to do because all of my Step by Steps still say 160* or higher IT, because that's what I've been doing for over 4 years.

 

I just chalk it up as all the big time smoking books are wrong.

 

 

 

Bear

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys. That is kind of what I figured but thought I'd ask. I'll do them in a hot water bath until proper IT is reached. Damn work getting in the way of me cooking stuff again
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearcarver View Post
 

OK---Jeff's the Boss! I can do 160* or better on this forum. Thumbs Up

 

That's easy for me to do because all of my Step by Steps still say 160* or higher IT, because that's what I've been doing for over 4 years.

 

I just chalk it up as all the big time smoking books are wrong.

 

 

 

Bear


I don't think the big time books are wrong, they just aren't regulated by the USDA. I personally cant tell some one your at a safe temp without data and the USDA has that from testing. Will you be safe using temps recommended by these books. Probably yes but all they have for data is experience and history. Would you recommend using the temps from these books to a frail little old person in poor health with a poor immune system.. Probably not. That's why the USDA temps are there to protect everyone

 

My 2 cents

post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by boykjo View Post
 


I don't think the big time books are wrong, they just aren't regulated by the USDA. I personally cant tell some one your at a safe temp without data and the USDA has that from testing. Will you be safe using temps recommended by these books. Probably yes but all they have for data is experience and history. Would you recommend using the temps from these books to a frail little old person in poor health with a poor immune system.. Probably not. That's why the USDA temps are there to protect everyone

 

My 2 cents

 

If you saw the debate I was in last week (not here), you would realize you're preaching to the choir.

I thought I explained that.

 

 

Bear

post #10 of 11

I 2nd that.Finish in hot , not boiling water bring to safe temp or cook it at higher temp. And remember .. smoking is one process and cooking is another . Cooking with smoke or as it is commonly called smoke cooking is not " smoking 'Weisswurst

post #11 of 11
I'd go with the water bath also, I get the water to 170°-175° and drop them in. I find that when they float they're done.
You could also put then back in the smoker and smoke them again!
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