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Starting the Smoke House - Page 2

post #21 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveOmak View Post

Board and batten needs X bracing to stop the building from "racking".....

 

That is good info to have. I am going to guess that the building can shift due to the lack of support provided by the siding? Do you think it will still be a problem with a structure as small as I'm building? or does size not matter?

post #22 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by speedsk899 View Post
 

 

That is good info to have. I am going to guess that the building can shift due to the lack of support provided by the siding? Do you think it will still be a problem with a structure as small as I'm building? or does size not matter?

You need to brace it, even the size you are building.A very strong wind storm or heavy wet snow  could ruin your day of smoking hahahahahahaa

post #23 of 39
Thread Starter 

Sounds good! Will do!

post #24 of 39
Thread Starter 

Just thought of another question. I was researching to make sure I understood the board and batten construction and noticed one thing. All of the examples I saw were using finished wood. I will be using rough cut lumber straight from the mill. Since it is rough cut will the boards still be able to move?

post #25 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by speedsk899 View Post

Just thought of another question. I was researching to make sure I understood the board and batten construction and noticed one thing. All of the examples I saw were using finished wood. I will be using rough cut lumber straight from the mill. Since it is rough cut will the boards still be able to move?

When board and batten was first used, there was no finished lumber.... Yes, cross bracing will be necessary .... Won't take much...
If you run the boards full height of the wall, 6', 1 cross brace per wall is sufficient..... on the inside..... top corner to opposite bottom corner... Then the shelf supports can be installed...
post #26 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by speedsk899 View Post
 

Just thought of another question. I was researching to make sure I understood the board and batten construction and noticed one thing. All of the examples I saw were using finished wood. I will be using rough cut lumber straight from the mill. Since it is rough cut will the boards still be able to move?

All wood moves to some degree.How much depends on many factors.Heat, cold humidity,species of wood,treated not treated etc etc etc.I wouldnt over think or research this construction project.Stay with strong structural basics of wood framing also square,straight and tight fitting cuts.

 

Dan

post #27 of 39




Red-Frame for attaching walls to each other..... Green- Racking brace..... Blue- vertical supports to attach shelf supports/slider rails..... Purple- shelves....

Red, green and blue should be the same thickness material attached to Boards.... Then purple shelves supports will all be on the same plane....
post #28 of 39
I am in for the ride! I love the concept of this build and want to watch......
post #29 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by speedsk899 View Post
 

Just thought of another question. I was researching to make sure I understood the board and batten construction and noticed one thing. All of the examples I saw were using finished wood. I will be using rough cut lumber straight from the mill. Since it is rough cut will the boards still be able to move?

 

Yes your rough cut lumber will move for sure  thumb1.gif

post #30 of 39

I work in the lumber industry as a Lumber Inspector, any wood that has not been either air dried or kiln dried is considered "green". General Rule of Thumb for Air drying is 1 year for every inch of thickness. Poplar is a great wood to use for siding, flooring, and framing. The only recommendation I would pass along is to have either white oak or treated wood for what ever parts come in contact with the ground or foundation because Poplar will rot if it stays moist. If you are just going to put it on runner/skids then I would try to use white oak if I could get it and build up from there using the poplar. I also agree using the board and batten style of siding will prove out to be most efficient. Reason I recommend this, one all wood moves and if you happen to use some wood that hasn't dried completely it allows the wood to shrink or expand without popping the boards. Also replacing a board is easier like stated earlier. We generally figure on a board shrinking from a 1/4 to 1/2 inch depending on what season the log was cut. Spring cut lumber will shrink more than Fall cut lumber due to the increase of sap in the log. Also keep in mind, a log will never completely dry out no matter how long it lays once the tree is cut. It will loose some moisture but minimal beyond the ends of the log where air can come in contact.

post #31 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTD2500 View Post

I work in the lumber industry as a Lumber Inspector, any wood that has not been either air dried or kiln dried is considered "green". General Rule of Thumb for Air drying is 1 year for every inch of thickness. Poplar is a great wood to use for siding, flooring, and framing. The only recommendation I would pass along is to have either white oak or treated wood for what ever parts come in contact with the ground or foundation because Poplar will rot if it stays moist. If you are just going to put it on runner/skids then I would try to use white oak if I could get it and build up from there using the poplar. I also agree using the board and batten style of siding will prove out to be most efficient. Reason I recommend this, one all wood moves and if you happen to use some wood that hasn't dried completely it allows the wood to shrink or expand without popping the boards. Also replacing a board is easier like stated earlier. We generally figure on a board shrinking from a 1/4 to 1/2 inch depending on what season the log was cut. Spring cut lumber will shrink more than Fall cut lumber due to the increase of sap in the log. Also keep in mind, a log will never completely dry out no matter how long it lays once the tree is cut. It will loose some moisture but minimal beyond the ends of the log where air can come in contact.


 



Great info! I didn't think about the wood that would be sitting against the cinder blocks. I have access to white oak, walnut, hickory, cherry........ (I save the last two for smoking) so cutting a couple pieces of white oak is not a problem.

Would it cause any problems if I didnt let the wood air dry for very long?

BTW I don't think you are very far from me!
post #32 of 39

On the White Oak I would make sure there is no sap wood on them, and if there is, try to keep it turned up and inside under the floor so its away from as much weather and moisture as possible. I wouldn't worry too much on drying those pieces. Depending on the dimension you decide to use, not drying the pieces very long will help reduce much warping, side bend, and twisting. If you aren't going to lay a full foundation and only plan to set blocks for leveling, I would recommend  sawing 4x6s and turning them on edge. Otherwise if you are going to have a full foundation then I would use 3x8s and laid flat. None of the big barns that used "native lumber" were built with dry lumber.

 

 

We would be at least 3 hrs apart if not a little more. I was trying to recall how many hours it took us to reach Columbus Ind., I know it took me 4 hrs. to drive to Worthington Ind.

post #33 of 39
Thread Starter 
My plan is to use two layers of cinder block mortored together. Drive T-Poles down and fill the respective holes with concrete. Bolts sticking up to bolt the framing to. I dont want it going anywhere! The floor will be gravel so I am assuming this is not a full foundation? The White oak logs I have to cut take every bit of a 24" bar on the 041 to cut through. Making 4x6 or 3x8's is not an issue! The mill will cut up to 13" thick.

May I ask why such a thick base board? Im sorry but I'm a curious person. I like to know why things are done a certain way.

Yes I would say your 3 hour estimate is right. I am about an hour east, south/east of worthington. I work just south of worthington.
post #34 of 39

Since you aren't going to have a wood floor, I would go with the 3x8s laid flat. Main reason I recommend that instead of a 2x8 is strength. This will be your sill plate and you will be attaching your entire building on these pieces and you want to make sure you have plenty of wood to anchor into. I have seen plenty of times using thinner lumber, the sill plate crack or split on the ends when framing in your corner post, also, a thicker piece wont twist as easily. Going with an 8 inch wide sill plate it should cover your blocks too.

 

I don't know what your laws are in Indiana, but in Ohio, any building that is anchored to a foundation is taxed. If its portable such as on skids and can be moved like a mini barn,  then its not taxed.

post #35 of 39
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the help! I like all the recommendations. I am hoping to get back to cutting boards this weekend. I think everything is starting to slow down now.

I believe the law is the same here. I'm not really concerned about it. Its kind of back in the woods anyway.
post #36 of 39

So looking forward to updates...................wink

post #37 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blacklab View Post

So looking forward to updates...................wink


 



Believe me I am too! haha. Too much going on and the weather has not been cooperating so that I can get boards cut. Soon though! This is still one of my top priority projects! Need this thing complete before deer season! Sorry its taking soo long everyone.
post #38 of 39
Thread Starter 
Well there has been a new delay. Saw is down....have to find a new one. Not lookign good for completing this season but this will be completed. Think I will try to find a little bigger saw than the 041.
post #39 of 39
Wouldn't stainless steel flashing between the cement block and the poplar wood solve the moisture problem.
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