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Did i add too much Cure #1 (Dry cured Bacon) - Page 2

post #21 of 24

Dave...

 

Of the three types of curing - Immersion, Pumping, Dry Curing (see above and the USDA Inspectors guide - BTW, thanks, Al, for posting the link to it)....which does it most appropriately align with?  To me, it aligns with dry curing, i.e., applying a measured amount of dry curing ingredients directly to the meat.  As such, I follow the recommended ppm for that method when curing my bacon.  As mentioned, I "sometimes" add a spoon of water....not 2 gallons,  And, BTW, you don't have to store in a ziplock bag, you could follow the same process and keep them in a food-safe tub while curing.  I use the bags for ease and cleanliness.  

 

Since you consider this method a brine, I have a question.  When you brine your turkey for thanksgiving, do you throw a bunch of dry seasonings and salt on it and seal it in a ziplock bag?  It that what you consider a brine...or do you create a pickle (brine) and immerse the turkey in it for a period of time?  To me, a brine would be an immersion cure.  .If that's how someone wants to cure their bacon, I would recommend following the process and guidelines for an immersion cure re nitrite ppm.  If they don't want to follow those guidelines...it's fine by me.

 

Look...I don't want to start a semantic back and forth.  The original poster was interested in determining the correct amount of Cure 1....I thought I could help so I posted my process. If you disagree...that's OK.   I didn't post here to engage in a philosophical bacon-off or to demean anyone else's opinions or methods.. I was trying to help a new guy get over the initial confusion and questions that arise; it;s been a while...but I remember what it was like.  I recommend that those that are truly interested should read the USDA guide - beginning on page 27 - for specifics on curing bacon if they want to get the straight skinny.

 

Everyone is free to do whatever they want - I have no problem with it.  If you want to brine it, dry cure it, rind on, rind off, cold smoke, hot smoke, use maple, slice thick, slice thin, cook in oven, cook in skillet, etc., etc. it's up to you...that;s the beauty of the hobby, and part of the joy of making your own bacon to your own tastes,   I'm sure that everyone's methods can produce some tasty end products, .and everyone here has their own tried-and-true methods and approach that they swear by.

 

Respectfully...  Osprey

 

post #22 of 24
You must be very careful when using the Inspector's Handbook...it's not intended for the general public.
Dry-curing means something very specific in the handbook (this I've confirmed with an FSIS inspector supervisor in Nebraska.)

More here....
http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/124452/confusing-dry-curing-with-dry-curing


~Martin
post #23 of 24
Osprey, morning..... There has been confusion about "Dry Curing" on the forum.... According to the FSIS Handbook up to 625 Ppm nitrite can be added to the product (200 for bacon) if "Dry Curing" is the method used...
Since Dry Curing requires multiple rubs of salt and cure over a given time..... something like a week to a month..... That insures the nitrite hasn't dissipated before it has a chance to penetrate the meat fully... Then additional absorption time/degradation time is allowed during the hanging process which dissipates more nitrite.....
Coating/Rubbing a piece of meat and placing it in a zip bag, we have taken the liberty to call that a "Dry Brining" process due the meat sitting in it's own juices or even a Tbs. or 2 of liquid added to increase the surface contact and a seemingly more equal distribution of spices and salt and cure.... Since there is little to no chance of the nitrite dissipating in a zip bag, the term "Dry Curing" is a misnomer compared to "Dry Brining" and the over addition of nitrite is less probable with the name change....

Anyway..... that has been the norm for the last little while on this site.....

To sum up what has been posted, and the guidelines a few of us use on this forum......

If you put a piece of meat in a bag, bucket or tub.... and the liquid is not allowed to drain from the meat.... that is a brining process regardless of the amount of liquid.....

Since the belly was in a device that did not allow for the liquid to drain away, and there was very little possibility of the nitrite to dissipate, I called it a brining process and 120 Ppm Max. allowable nitrite input for bacon (skin off) is recommended....

Since that is the way we have been doing things around here, and I was not looking to have our newer members confused in the terminology, I tried to clarify what was posted....

You are free to use any method you like and you can think I am wrong in my assumptions....... On this forum, if we see something that doesn't follow "accepted practice" we make a note to clarify for the members.....

Since this all started with your first post on this forum....

Welcome to the forum.... Please stop by "Roll Call" and introduce yourself to the membership.... Dave
post #24 of 24
To all that have posted their point of view, thoughts, and opinions to this thread.... Please don't feel like anybody is attacking one another... everything that is mentioned here is VERY informattable (is that a word)... so please keep posting your thoughts and opinions as we are all learning different ways on which we can choose to do ourselves....
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